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Comments

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Long-Wave Radar Can Take the Stealth From Stealth Technology

FlyingGuy VERY old news (275 comments)

This has been a known Achilles heel for stealth technology since it first came out.

Take a cheap Furuno surface search radar play around with the main frequency and the pulse repetition frequency, and not by a lot, and all of the sudden things that never painted before suddenly appear.

This is one of the main principles of mine detection sonar. You can make fairly large changes in the output frequency to really tune the thing once you know the relative size and shape of the target you are searching for. Torpedo's do the same thing. The search on a relatively low frequency then when the algorithm thinks it has something it switches to frequencies typically 10 to 20 times higher for high resolution aiming. The exact same principles could be applied. AWACS could search and much lower frequencies then vector fighters in with the ability to not change the frequencies a lot, but lower them down to just above the thresholds for the very small antennas. Close enough and no matter how the target is shaped you will get a return.

about two weeks ago
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The Great Taxi Upheaval

FlyingGuy Re:A rose by any other name (218 comments)

You sir are a completely uninformed and obviously blind to history moron.

Banks playing fast and loose with depositor's money caused the financial crisis, just like it caused in 1929.

In response the government passed both Securities Act of 1933 and the Glass-Steagall Act the prohibited commercial banks ( those banks that hold customer deposits ) to prevent such insanity as using customer funds to gamble on highly speculative and extremely risky business investments.

You would have think we would have learned from the Savings and Loan crisis, yes that bit of lunacy that cost the tax payers billions of dollars when we decided to deregulate savings and loan institutions.

Then just a few years ago Glass-Steagall was basically gutted and the party was on! Banks put their customers money into all sorts of hairball shit like derivatives and other such insanity. Combine that with making loans to people to buy houses they had no business making loans to and here we go again. Free Market they cried from the rooftops! Adam Smiths invisible hand they cried from the rooftops of their palaces! Just let the market be free and we will all prosper they told us.

And what happened? Pure greed took over from regulation and it damn near bankrupted the country, a very few people got mega rich, a bunch more got filthy rich and a number more made a killing. The result of which forced us to sell billions of securities to the likes of China and anyone else we could beg. The national debt is really beyond belief.

A free market is good but unfortunately the market does not take into account the dishonesty of man. In China they take you out and shoot you for shit like the CEO's of those huge banks did and all the little minions that were in on it. What did those people get? Huge bonuses, golden parachutes and the rest of us got stuck holding the bag.

So you pull your head out of your ass, walk out of the echo chamber and really learn what is happening around you.

about three weeks ago
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Oracle Offers Custom Intel Chips and Unanticipated Costs

FlyingGuy Re:Sales flow chart. (97 comments)

PostGres compares ok on a lot of workloads, but when the rubber really hits the road that is when it starts to fall apart.

They must fix the TXID ID problem. It will now at least shut down when it is getting close to rolling over, but the vacuum process will just kill your performance in very high transaction workloads. Not that Oracle would not have the same problem if they were using a 32 bit number for the value, but with the size of the ID Oracle uses this won't happen for ~ 140 years.

Immovability... PostGres gets some great performance but it does so at the cost of the data files being so close to the metal that you can't move them to another host that is not exactly the same as it is moving from. If that is not true you have to do an SQLDUMP of the data. That is a fairly fatal flaw in my opinion.

So yes you can use PG in place of Oracle, to a point, but after that point it just does not perform as required.

I migrated a PG DB to Oracle 11g EE and it runs quite smoothly. The application would quickly overwhelm PG without some serious changes to the PG code.

about three weeks ago
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WebODF: JavaScript Open Document Format Editor Deemed Stable

FlyingGuy Re:Can you say, HUGE SECURITY HOLE (91 comments)

Yeah that's reassuring and all. The WC3 takes security very seriously as well as do the makers of Mozilla, IE, Chrome, Opera, Safari et al. but never the less we still have drive by's, we still have machines with AV software, anti-malware, Sand Boxing software etc installed and they still get through and steal whatever they want.

Javascript is a language that scares the hell out of anyone who takes security seriously. You can shove text at any object and presto that is now executable code, oh yay!!! Your code ( yeah I looked ) is full of the convention of function( "function{}" ) and that is just as bad as PHP taking links to remote servers as parameters to functions. Do you really think this is going to survive in the wild? Really dude this is injection just waiting to happen. I applaud your cleverness, but this "software" is going to get ass raped and your reputation is going to be ruined.

There are better ways to do this. Doing this in the web browser as it currently exists is just foolish. I am building an application frame ( appFrame ) that can run actual applications free from the asshattery that is HTML and CSS.

about a month and a half ago
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WebODF: JavaScript Open Document Format Editor Deemed Stable

FlyingGuy Can you say, HUGE SECURITY HOLE (91 comments)

This thing has access to my hard drive, to fucking save files!!!!

This thing will never, ever, be used anywhere I have a say about. This is ripe for someone to hook it from another page and write shit to anywhere on your hard disk that you have permission to write to. Drive By's were bad enough but now we have opened the flood gates. The script kiddies and the black hast are going to have a field day owning anyone who runs this.

The Browser is bad enough as it is with "precisely formed" URL's being able to rape your machine, and now this. Some PHB is going mandate this and the number of machines and networks jacked is going to be quite a show.

No one has been able to successfully sand box a browser. The browser was never ever supposed to be able to access the local machine directly, but in the name of the all mighty cloud we keep tearing down barrier after barrier and no one is saying anything about it, we just keep changing chairs while the band plays.

about a month and a half ago
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Ask Slashdot: Choosing a Web Language That's Long-Lived, and Not Too Buzzy?

FlyingGuy Re:How to Fail (536 comments)

ROFLMAO!

Spreadsheets are great tools for accounts and they have made their life a lot easier. But you are right, they are evil because suddenly accountants started using them to do things that should have been done in databases etc. But I think we have only ourselves to blame if you really think about it.

about a month and a half ago
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Ask Slashdot: Choosing a Web Language That's Long-Lived, and Not Too Buzzy?

FlyingGuy Re:How to Fail (536 comments)

1. Rewrite your code [joelonsoftware.com]

I mostly agree with what this guy says with the exception of Quatro by the old Borland. Quattro by all accounts was eating Lotus Development and Microsoft's lunch in the spreadsheet department. It had WYSIWYG natively before either of them ( 123's was an add-on and excell didn't even have one) and it worked beautifully. Embedded graphs were there, Multiple Sheets and a function library that was richer than either of the others.

Then the Look & Feel lawsuit hit. Jim Mansey ( if he stood in front of me today, I would punch him hard and punch him again even harder ) after having let 123 rest on it's laurels took Borland to court, in Boston. Borland eventual prevailed but not until it had spent most all it's cash and suffered the basic abandonment of Quattro by the marketplace because of the suit.

That really was the beginning of the end for innovation in the spreadsheet world. Excel has turned into a bloated beast that no one really likes, but it is the only thing left in the marketplace ( Don't get me wrong I wholly support Open / Libre Office but they will never overtake Excel as the simply have to play catchup constantly ) that anyone can field. Quattro still exists but the last release was about 2 years ago

about a month and a half ago
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Russia Wants To Replace US Computer Chips With Local Processors

FlyingGuy Re:Please choose a new instruction set! (340 comments)

While I agree with some of what you say, I cannot help but disagree completely with:>/p>

Something optimized specifically for compilers and modern programming languages.

Such ideas are a complete waste of machine resources, ram, registers, and cpu cycles et al. "Modern Languages" have to do more than should ever be required to account for programmer laziness. Dynamic typing? Takes up huge amounts of resources to have to constantly figure out what the type of EVERY variable it encounters. Virtual Machines? More splitting of cpu time because none of those "modern" languages know how to deal w/multiple cores, hell we barely have languages that can deal with multiple cpu's as it is.

FSB speeds rarely, if ever, exceed 450MHZ and then the cpu is in a pretty much constant wait state for data. Disk I/O is still pretty damn slow when compared to everything else. SSD's have contributed a large amount in improving that but they still make the whole system wait. Network I/O still crawls in comparison unless you are using very specialized and very expensive technology that is mostly reserved for things like mainframes ( think IBM's Deep Blue ).

I dream of going back to big full height drives with the sort of data densities we have now backed down a couple of notches. Separate read and write heads. Elevator seeking and writing so that you can read in a terabyte on one rotation. Running on a parallel buss that clocks a byte of data onto the buss every clock cycle and connected by fiber optics.

Just imagine 64 or 128 fiber strands connecting every component. Experimental rates are over 100 terabytes per second, for a single fiber!!!!! Imagine even just 10% percent of that inside your machine! Your bus capable of signaling at 10 TBS!!! The CPU would be the component everyone is waiting for!!!

Now just imagine a machine that with a very efficient language like C without all the cruft that things like Java, Python, PHP and all those other "modern" bring to the table.

And of course one must imagine what a Beowulf cluster of those would be like...

about 2 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Best Rapid Development Language To Learn Today?

FlyingGuy Re:Lazarus/Freepascal (466 comments)

Being from the Delphi camp for many years, I too recommend this, but they need to get the install worked out. Also they need to get LLDB worked out on the Mac because trying to load in another version of XCode to sit beside the latest for just the debugger is a royal pain in the ass.

about 2 months ago
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Teacher Tenure Laws Ruled Unconstitutional In California

FlyingGuy Re:Only incompetent teachers need tenure (519 comments)

Your position is not only short sighted but ignorant. Precedent precedes many many things. Think about the precedent this sets for someplace like Oklahoma where they push hard to denounce science and only want to teach that the earth and everything else was created in 6 days. Teachers have to push back just as hard and now they can be summarily dismissed if they don't fall into line.

Be very careful what you wish for.

about 2 months ago
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id Software's Original 'Softdisk' Games Open Sourced

FlyingGuy Re:Wow.. Pascal. (100 comments)

Hmm you user the term ABEND

Were you ever a Novell CNE? The term of course means, Abnormal End, but it is rare to see the usage outside of the Netware ecosystem.

As to Pascal Programs failing gracefully and not taking the entire system with it... I think that might have been the advent of actual protected mode operation -v- declaration and discipline. In my early days of my programming career first learning how to use pointers effectively I would routinely crash my machine by running a pointer into the OS space ( MS-DOS 2.x and 3.x ) on 8088 machines and corrupting all sorts of data and code structures.

Having programming now fr more years that I care to admit to at times I have seen the proliferation of the mind set that simply ignores things like structure and massive abuse of the OOP model. These days you start looking through code and see variables created on an ad-hoc basis for no other reason than laziness when 20 minutes of code refactoring would have solved the problem and the system would have made far more sense and in the end would ave performed faster and been more logically cohesive.

about 2 months ago
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Bill Watterson (briefly) Returns To Comics

FlyingGuy Re:I wonder where Watterson would go today (119 comments)

As a matter of fact Watterson never licensed any part of C&H for anything. The guy could have made a medium to large sized fortune if he had, but to him the integrity of the strip was FAR more important. The only reason it is running is certain places is because King Features Syndicate has the right to redistribute the comic.

I was a huge fan of the strip. I mean I knew it had to happen at some point, but I was heartbroken when it stopped.

When my son was born I named him Calvin ( my maternal grandfather ), but the running joke is that he was named after the character. When he was two 3 weeks old, a woman who lived in the same building took a white One-Z and hand painted a beautiful Hobs on it. He is 13 now and it is framed on his bedroom wall.

about 2 months ago
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id Software's Original 'Softdisk' Games Open Sourced

FlyingGuy Re:Wow.. Pascal. (100 comments)

Remember the old days of 64K code and data AND segment offset, and LIM sepc?

about 2 months ago
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id Software's Original 'Softdisk' Games Open Sourced

FlyingGuy Re:Wow.. Pascal. (100 comments)

Wow, really?

It is called analyzing your project and mapping the thing out before you write a single line of code. Programming is a discipline as well as an art and a science.

I was once talking to a guy and he as complaining the compiler kept erroring out on "symbol table is full". I asked to look at his code and OMG he was declaring variables by the butt load, but the thing of it was they were all subtle variations of the same thing, and lots and lots of structs. So I should him how to make a linked list of a single of structs with variants. I explained that with little effort these would be declared on the heap and that running out of space in the symbol table would be a thing of the past. Also he was no longer limited by the stack and that he had all the memory the machine could muster for variables.

These days troubleshooting code has become such a chore simply because languages these days let you declare variables anywhere so you have to track down where things declared just to figure out what is happening and dynamically typed languages are the absolute worst thing to come along simply because they only add to the confusion since the compiler or intepreter has to try and determine intent and they all pretty much suck at doing it.

I have written pascal programs in excess of 100K lines broken up into many modules and I actually find them easier to debug than other so called modern languages simple because the discipline of declaration forces you to really think things through, rather than just popping things in here and there in an ad-hoc manner.

about 2 months ago
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Tux3 File System Could Finally Make It Into the Mainline Linux Kernel

FlyingGuy Re:YASF (c) forver by me (121 comments)

Nope, not trolling..

Since it is open source and has all those goodies it would seem to me that increasing the volume size capabilities would not be nearly as tall an order as starting over from scratch.

about 3 months ago
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Tux3 File System Could Finally Make It Into the Mainline Linux Kernel

FlyingGuy YASF (c) forver by me (121 comments)

YASF or Yet Another File System.

Well someone has yet another personal project they want us all to take seriously. Really? I mean Really?

Of the numerous file systems out there, and I have tried a whole boat load of them, the one that is the most mature, most reliable, arguably the fastest is... Wait for it... From the company that everyone loves to hate...

Is NSS from Novell. It has more posix features then all of the rest of them, it is insanely fast, it provides undelete and complete repeatability and Novell has open sourced it. Nuff said.

about 3 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Minimum Programming Competence In Order To Get a Job?

FlyingGuy Re:Engineers, not Programmers (466 comments)

What you are describing is a Software Engineer not an electrical engineer or an aerospace engineer or any other kind of civil engineer. I work with a boat load of civil engineers who are extraordinarily competent in their distinct skill set. They can do some prototyping in matlab and a few other things but when it comes to writing actual software they just need to step very far away from the compiler because their minds don't think in those spheres.

about 3 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Beginner To Intermediate Programming Projects?

FlyingGuy Create a Doubly Linked List (172 comments)

Write all the parts...:

  • Insertion Function
  • Deletion Function
  • Traversal Function
  • Search Function
  • Sort Function
  • Save to Disk Function
  • Load from Disk Function

You can do this in C. C comes with EVERY Linux distribution so no additional parts or bits required. If you can do this, you really can do most anything and further more you will understand some of the more advanced concepts of computer programming, one of the most important is Memory Management. Now I know that with languages like Java you are far removed from those concepts bust just understanding what you have to do to manage your memory footprint will help you in those languages as well since you will have a much clearer understanding of what is going on under the hood. If you push a few boundaries you will understand some of less obvious parts of other languages.

about 3 months ago
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Setback For Small Nuclear Reactors: B&W Cuts mPower Funding

FlyingGuy Re:New Designs Not Required... (165 comments)

My memory is really fading.. The S6g provided ~ 148 thermal megawatts which is ~ 45 megawatts of electricity. Although the Rankine cycle is pretty much fixed you can build more efficient turbines and steam generators that do not have to exist in the very tight confines of a submarine.

about 4 months ago

Submissions

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Google caught abusing user privacy yet again!

FlyingGuy FlyingGuy writes  |  more than 2 years ago

FlyingGuy writes "The "Do No Evil" motto of Google was besmirched yet again when it revealed that it had coded around Apple's Safari web browser's privacy controls. Now one could accuse Apple of having lousy privacy controls but the idea that Google would deliberately code around what controls do exist is yet another black eye for Google. The Silicon Valley Mercury News reporter, M. Swift reports,

Google's (GOOG) admission late Thursday that it circumvented privacy controls in the web browsers of Apple (AAPL) iPhone and Mac users — the latest in a series of privacy breaches by the Internet giant — promises to plunge Google in even deeper problems with regulators scrutinizing the company's practices.

"

Link to Original Source
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HP Releases WebOS as Open Source

FlyingGuy FlyingGuy writes  |  more than 2 years ago

FlyingGuy writes "HP today announced it will contribute the webOS software to the open source community.

HP plans to continue to be active in the development and support of webOS. By combining the innovative webOS platform with the development power of the open source community, there is the opportunity to significantly improve applications and web services for the next generation of devices."

Link to Original Source
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Isolated genes can be patented, court rules

FlyingGuy FlyingGuy writes  |  about 3 years ago

FlyingGuy writes "The Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, which specializes in patent cases, said that Myriad Genetics was entitled to patents on two human genes used to predict whether women have an increased risk of getting breast and ovarian cancer."
Link to Original Source
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Air France Flight447 FDR & CVR Data Intact

FlyingGuy FlyingGuy writes  |  more than 3 years ago

FlyingGuy writes "Investigators trying to determine why an Air France plane crashed mysteriously two years ago have recovered the complete contents of the flight data recorder and the last two hours of cockpit conversation, they announced Monday."
Link to Original Source
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Drive By's and Malware

FlyingGuy FlyingGuy writes  |  more than 3 years ago

FlyingGuy writes "Someplace back in the early days of browsers and such there must have been a point where someone who was building these programs must have said to themselves, "Self, wouldn't it be neat if you could automatically download files to anyplace on the machine and then execute them without the user having to bother saying it was ok."

Someone someplace on good ol' ./ has to have the inside scoop on this. More importantly someone has to have the scoop on why after the very first "Drive By" the code that allowed this was not ripped from the software with extreme prejudice!"

So whats the scoop ./ readers? Was it benignly intentional, was it naiveté or just plain stupid?"
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Samsung offers free phones to frustrated iPhone us

FlyingGuy FlyingGuy writes  |  about 4 years ago

FlyingGuy writes "Samsung is taking a bold step in capitalizing on Apples troubles with the iPhone 4 and sending a free Galaxy S smartphone to iPhone 4 users. Talk about gorilla marketing!"
Link to Original Source
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Mark Zuckerberg is SO screwed

FlyingGuy FlyingGuy writes  |  about 4 years ago

FlyingGuy writes "Facebook CEO and founder Mark Zuckerberg appears to be quite screwed according to the contract he signed 2003 with upstate New York wood-pellet vendor Paul Ceglia. The contract has very specific language that could in all likelihood hand over 84% of Facebook to Mr. Ceglia unless the courts can be convinced that it is either a forgery or the contract has somehow expired. Read the contract here for yourself but the salient bits are:
  • Buyer agrees to pay the seller the sum of $1,000 a piece for the work to be performed for StreetFax and $1,000 for the work to be performed for "The Face Book"...
  • The agreed upon completion for the expanded project with working title "The Face Book" shall be January 1 2004 and an additional 1% interest in the business will be due the buyer for each day the website is delayed from that date.
  • Additional funds may be provided for either project on an as needed basis at the sole discretion of the Buyer.
  • For "The Face Book" Seller [Mark Zuckerberg] agrees to act as the sites webmaster and to pay for all domain and hosting expenses from the funds received under this contract, and the Seller [Mark Zuckerberg] agrees that he will maintain control of these services at all times.
"

Link to Original Source
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Novell Board Declines Elliot's Offer

FlyingGuy FlyingGuy writes  |  more than 4 years ago

FlyingGuy writes "In an e-mail sent to partners and VARS ( of which I am one ), CEO Ron Hovsepian sent the the following:

Dear Valued Partner,

As you may know, on March 2nd, Elliott Associates, L.P. announced an unsolicited, conditional proposal to acquire Novell. Today we issued a press release announcing that our Board of Directors has concluded, after careful consideration, including a review of the proposal with its independent financial and legal advisors, that Elliott's proposal is inadequate and that it undervalues the Company's franchise and growth prospects.

Additionally, we announced that our Board has authorized a thorough review of various alternatives to enhance stockholder value.

Our relationship with you is extremely important to all of us at Novell, and I want to assure you that you can remain confident that we are committed to serving you as we always have. I also want to reaffirm to you that it remains business as usual at Novell, and we do not intend for there to be any changes in our relationship with you. Please do not hesitate to contact me or other members of our team at any time; we always strive to be available to provide you the best solutions for your needs.

On behalf of the Board and management team, I thank you for your ongoing commitment to Novell.

Sincerely,

Ron Hovsepian
President and CEO

"
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New Whitehouse website is a dog....

FlyingGuy FlyingGuy writes  |  more than 4 years ago

FlyingGuy writes "As I was browsing through through The Whitehouse web site I used the contact form to send a note of congratulations to the new President. I filled in the requires fields and then began typing my text. To my surprise I noticed the text lagging very badly as I typed.

Now given the web site I was accessing I knew that every click was being logged. I noted the comment form had a max char count of 500. This is simple enough to do in a little JS as I have done it many times. Yet for some reason my text was appearing with about a 5 second lag!

So i had a peak at the source and this is the JS function that I found:





      function counterUpdate(opt_countedTextBox, opt_countBody, opt_maxSize)
      {
            var countedTextBox = opt_countedTextBox ? opt_countedTextBox : "counttxt";
            var countBody = opt_countBody ? opt_countBody : "countBody";
            var maxSize = opt_maxSize ? opt_maxSize : 500;

            var field = document.getElementById(countedTextBox);

            if (field && field.value.length >= maxSize)
            {
                  field.value = field.value.substring(0, maxSize);
            }

            var txtField = document.getElementById(countBody);

            if (txtField)
            {
                  txtField.innerHTML = maxSize — field.value.length;
            }
      }


Now to me this sems just a bit over the top for a simple counter / truncate mechanism It would seem to me to be better implemented thusly:



      function counterUpdate(field,maxSize,sizeLabel)
      {
            var countedField = document.getElementById(countedTextBox);
            var countLabel = document.getElementById(sizelabel);
            var currentSize = countedField.value.length
            if(currentSize >= maxSize){
                  countedField.value = countedField.value.substring(0,maxSize);
            }

            countLabel.value = currentSize ;

      }

I tested the site on a SLES box running FF 2.x and a windows box running FF 3.x and both showed the same very poor performance. Am I missing something here? I did not test my suggested replacement,"
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A Linux workstation for <b>Business</b>

FlyingGuy FlyingGuy writes  |  more than 5 years ago

FlyingGuy writes "So 2009 may or may not be the year of the Linux Desktop, but let us for sake of argument say it is.

Now keeping in mind that the vast majority of business users are not what anyone would define as a power users since they are mostly just general workers, secretaries, order takers, line workers that do a set number of tasks, often repeatedly, in reality they are just users.

Keeping in mind that management always wants the smallest IT budget they can get away with, they want lots of uptime, peace in the rank and file and the minimum amount of calls to the help desk.

Keeping in mind that IT for the most part wants to set up a machine with the applications required to do the job maybe a few extras like multi-media and chat but not much more. Obviously Open Office fits in here, perhaps Novell's GroupWise or IBM's Office Suite aka Lotus and some other stuff and they want to plop it down and forget about it since they have a ton of other shite to get done

Considering this will be compared to a typical Windows Workstation, what does the collective wisdom of /. think would satisfy the following requirements:
  1. As user proof as possible
  2. As compatible as possible
  3. As secure as possible
  4. At least one RAD Tool
  5. As remotely Manageable as possible with a GUI

Now FOSS is cool, but there are somethings you just have to pay for, support, specialized versions of software, etc. so don't make cost a very big part of your process. Keep in mind these business are more then likely not going to want hire support people that can build the kernel or Open Office or anything else that takes more then typing make with probably less then one page of large type instructions.

So with that in mind, and trying not to be too awfully distro centric, what is the best combination of tools for both support and user to make a Linux desktop for business that will make the grade?

P.S. I like humor as much as the next guy, but this is a serious question. Linux needs to forge ahead onto the desktop if we are to continue our march, so please some serious answers."

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IBM and Novell pair a Mid-Level Z system with SLES

FlyingGuy FlyingGuy writes  |  more than 5 years ago

FlyingGuy writes "Novell has released a version of SLES ( SuSe Linux Enterprise Server ) for the IMB Z Series of mid-sized mainframes.

Designed as a powerful, entry-level version of the IBM System z10 Enterprise Class (z10 EC) mainframe announced earlier this year, the IBM z10 BC provides small to mid-sized clients with all the unique attributes of an IBM mainframe.

For customers seeking server consolidation options to cut costs, the IBM z10 BC delivers the capacity equivalent of up to 230 x86 servers, with 83% smaller footprint, up to 93% lower energy costs, and a much higher level of security, control and automation--allowing for up to 100% utilization. In a business climate of mergers, acquisitions and cost-cutting pressures, server consolidation brings improved standardization, security, management and facilities utilizations."

Link to Original Source
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Is the once mighty Moto headed for the scrap heap?

FlyingGuy FlyingGuy writes  |  more than 6 years ago

FlyingGuy writes "Coming on the heals of a year that saw Motorola lose 1.2 billion and phone sales drop by 33% there are apparently plans afoot to split the once mighty giant and spin off the phone business. BBC News is running this brief article quoting the new CEO and Carl Ichon.

Is this just casting off dead wood, or could this possibly result in a leaner and more aggressive handset manufacturer no long encumbered by the stodginess of the once mighty giant? Does the Motorola brand have any real cache left?"
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FlyingGuy FlyingGuy writes  |  more than 7 years ago

FlyingGuy writes "As reported by the BBC News Internet Service Provider TISCALI has been hit by a massive SPAM wave, resulting in mail failure for a great many of its 1.8 million customers.

Interestingly enough Spamhaus does not see a major problem. FTA:

Spamhaus is certainly not seeing anything that would justify major blocking, unless it is being targeted at one or two specific networks.
"
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FlyingGuy FlyingGuy writes  |  more than 7 years ago

FlyingGuy (989135) writes "The founder of Ubuntu, Mark Shuttleworth, has apparently decided to take on Microsoft directly.

CNN is quoting [www.cnn.com] him as saying, "Ultimately open source is the platform of the future,".

Could this be a preulude to an all out battle between Ubuntu and Microsoft? What do you think the outcome will be?"
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FlyingGuy FlyingGuy writes  |  more than 7 years ago

FlyingGuy writes "MacWorld UK is reporting that Open Office will be a Native Mac Application [macworld.co.uk].

Mac users now have an Office Production Application that has all the features and cross-platform capabilty that will allow them to truely be native document portable.

Is this yet another direct hit on MS's Office Suit? Now not being a Mac user myself, although I will buy one for my son when he gets a little older, I understood that even between like versions of the MS Office Suit that were fairly glaring discrepencies when moving from Mac to Windows or the reverse. Has this finally given the two camps a universal translator?"
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FlyingGuy FlyingGuy writes  |  more than 7 years ago

FlyingGuy (989135) writes "According to CNN Money [money.cnn.com] Google CEO Eric Schmidt has joined the Board of Directors of Apple Computer, Inc.

"Like Apple, Google is very focused on innovation and we think Eric's insights and experience will be very valuable in helping to guide Apple in the years ahead," Apple CEO Steve Jobs said in a statement.

Is it just another buddy buddy, "You be my pal on my board, or are Apple & Google planning somthing long or near term?

Steve ( nuttin up my sleve ) Jobs has long been known for not tipping his hand when he has something new and exciting cooking up. Could this be a change in that behavior? Could this mean that Goolge & Apple are teaming up to wage the inevitable war that must happen with the folks from Remond?

Whats your take on this bit of news?"

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