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Ask Slashdot: Best Practices For Starting and Running a Software Shop?

FlyingGuy So yu want to be a software shop... (176 comments)

The best replies I have seen are from Zurk,& Kohath so let me add to that.

Either develop a market or a product that will fill some segment of a market, first before you do anything.

Now let me suggest that you target a market where the predominant players have become lazy and charge a LOT for their software.

This company Zemax started off when optical design software had a few big players. Their software, on average was selling for $30.000 US per seat. The company founder got a PhD in optical design and while he was still at school started writing his software. What he did was build a PC based optical design system that did 98% of what the big players did. But in that 98% he included what a lot of people term is that last 2% which is the really hard work. He left a lot of the simpler things for later. When he released version 1.0 he sold it for $2500.00 per seat ( with the hardest dongle he could buy at the time ) and after the first month he was moving ~ 10 units a month. In 20 years his price for the basic software has only gone up to $3600.00 a seat.

Make no mistake he worked his ass off to do it, he did it by himself for a long time before he hired his first employe. The company is still privately held and the man stopped having to work for a living many years ago, but he still does it because he loves what he does.

about a month ago
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Bats Can Jam Each Other's Ultrasonic Signals

FlyingGuy Reading *WAY* tou much into... (50 comments)

And anthropomorphizing on top of it all.

Look until we can find a way to clearly communicate with bats, or any other species other than other humans, and that is a stretch at times, I ain't drinking this particular glass of cool-aid.

Having been a SONAR technician and having used some of the coolest acoustic toys ever made, I think a more likely conclusion might be:

I find that in a group of bats trying to home in one a single insect they frequently target the same insect and interference patterns are formed causing one or more of the bats acoustic homing to be distorted.

about 1 month ago
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Apple Pay Competitor CurrentC Breached

FlyingGuy Re:And I be they used all the latest... (265 comments)

I normally do not respond to AC since 99.9999999% they are trolling, but I will reply since it is actually quite simple.

update_user_pword(uname,curpass,newpass);

and it simply returns true or false, 1 or 0 nothing more, nothing less.

An most importantly use ONE WAY ENCRYPTION when storing a user password! Novel's Netware did this and it was NEVER cracked.

In postgres & oracle you can grant execute to the procedure and or function without giving any rights of any kind to the user to the underlying tables.

In oracle you can write procedures to execute using the schema owner permission, but that permission is never granted to the user so it executes safely. Since procedures and functions only take in parameters and those parameters are never executed then they cannot be injected.

There are many many techniques to have the DB time out the user rather than relying on the middle ware or the browser code.

In the previous example the validation function could return either null or a 512 byte hash that is recorded in an internal table with a timestamp which triggers an inactivity timeout. Whenever the user does anything it must be accompanied by that hash and the DB will only return data if the hash matches, else it returns failure. The timestamp need never be returned to the client, only the hash and that hash can be created from anything, time,user name, count of records in a table, current system load, choose anything that will never repeat. At worst a given hash will be valid for only ( timeout period ) minutes. You can even write the web client so it heartbeats and the system returns a new hash every heartbeat, so even if the client connection is severed the hash is only valid for (heartbeat interval) then its time to live has expired.

Designing in solid security is not hard, it just requires the will to do it and to avoid the common programming patterns that have proven themselves to be very, uhm, shall we say, weak.

about 2 months ago
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Apple Pay Competitor CurrentC Breached

FlyingGuy And I be they used all the latest... (265 comments)

cool frameworks and Languages too!

When are programmers going to wake up and smell the coffee!

You are screwing around with peoples money. You cannot just slap the latest cool frameworks together, write 50 lines of connection code and call it a system.

I would be willing to bet that there is a single database credential that has rights to insert/update/delete/select on all the tables in the system and its is stored in some xml file that the web application has access to and if the web application has access to it so do all the people trying to break in.

I cannot begin to count just how many times I have seen the following:

select * from users where id=? and password=?

and that returns everything about the user. Every modern database supports either functions or procedures to do something like:

validate_user(uname,upass);

and it simply returns true or false, 1 or 0 nothing more, nothing less.

Far far to often I hear, lets use [ fill in the blank ] framework because that is what everyone else uses and besides look how much more productive we are! And so it is taken upon nothing more than faith and 90% of the time the people saying vehemently that that is the way to go, understand perhaps 10% of the framework code and don't investigate any further. When you are considering a framework that is 100's of thousands of lines of code that more then likely wouldn't pass the particular languages version of Lint or Bounds or any other validation tool you have already lost the security war.

The people who are actively trying to break into large systems do their homework! They spend weeks or months looking at your generated web code looking for patterns that reveal the underlying frameworks and then comb through that code looking for even the most subtle vulnerabilities and then they make a plan and execute it.

When you are building systems like this if you don't start with security as priority #1, for the entire stack you will lose, it is just a matter of time.

about 2 months ago
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Machine Learning Expert Michael Jordan On the Delusions of Big Data

FlyingGuy Re:I disagree. (145 comments)

This machine which is really awesome: https://www.youtube.com/watch?... [youtube.com]

Sorry but this is not what I have in mind when I think of CV. This could be accomplished using hardware alone. All the pencils are very carefully lined up and running at a fixed rate past a sensor. The image is very small and all you have to look for is is the bit pattern representing the specific color then activate the solenoid for the puff of air.

When I have thought of CV, and it comes around often, the biggest problem I see is the randomness of the perspective view of the object. Take bowling ball for and place it anywhere. To the human who knows what a bowling ball is, it really does not matter what the perspective is. We recognize if based upon its general size, pattern of swirls, holes, scuffs on it and other factors in low light, bright light or even "normal" light.

Even an object that we have never seen before becomes fairly instantly recognizable if given only it's noun name.

The massive amount of information our brain "collects and stores" that allow us to do this is in its level of complexity so completely beyond anything we have ever done in silicon it might as well be magic.

about 2 months ago
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The One App You Need On Your Resume If You Want a Job At Google

FlyingGuy Matlab and Java (205 comments)

A match made in hell!

about 2 months ago
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Designing Tomorrow's Air Traffic Control Systems

FlyingGuy Re:TCAS, Mode S, and IFR (72 comments)

The risk of en-route collision is really, really small.

this risk of collision increases exponentially as all the planes bound for JFK, Newark, LaGuardia, LAX, SFO etc. get closer to the airport. I live in the SF Bay Area, on busy flight night and there is no fog you can see them lined up for landing for miles and miles, two abreast on the approach to 28L/R and that is when you can't have every pilot deciding for themselves what order they go in and how far apart they are.

As for TCAS it is a good thing, but it has limits as to how much information if gives you. 500ft below at 270 relative to you, and in a landing pattern or executing the published missed approach it is just not good enough when 400 peoples lives are on the line.

As far as en-route goes everyone is going to be trying to fly the least cost route from say KLAX to KJFK. With the volume of flights getting larger and larger how long do you give it before the pissing matches start over who gets the route in that time slot?

You can only land so many planes at a given airport in n amount of time. If everyone gets there at around the same time the sequencing for landing is going to be way to hairball.

The PHB's should never, ever, be in charge of something like this.

about 2 months ago
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Liking Analog Meters Doesn't Make You a Luddite (Video)

FlyingGuy Re:Analog Guages Will Always be Better (155 comments)

Well besides being a single point of failure I can't really see what could possibly be wrong with that.

In an airliner you have several screens that can display and particular set of indicators, and as was previously mentioned, as analog guages, in a small plane you are lucky if you have two, but generally speaking you only have one and they are not so very big.

Of all the studies of human factors in operating hi performance equipment in possibly dangerous situations airplane cockpits are probably the most intensely studied, so I think I will take their results coupled with my own experience and stick to analog guages for flying.

about 3 months ago
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Liking Analog Meters Doesn't Make You a Luddite (Video)

FlyingGuy Analog Guages Will Always be Better (155 comments)

I am a pilot and for the most part every guage in the plane points straight up to 12 o'clock when things are normal

With one glance I can tell that everything is running fine, I don't have to think, I just look and in a busy cockpit that can mean the difference between life and death. If I am shooting an IFR approach down to minimums I have a very rapid scan of a very few instruments and every 5th scan or so it is a full panel scan so I know that among other things, the vacuum pump suction level is correct, and it is normally on the other side of the cockpit ( small planes). Everything pointing straight up, yep all is well, back to my limited IFR scan.

about 3 months ago
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JP Morgan Chase Breach Compromised Data of 76 Million Households

FlyingGuy Security - WWW (76 comments)

That phrase is quickly turning into the newest oxymoron.

Hey I know lets stitch together these 8 completely open and utterly un-certifiable frameworks, have everything talk to each other through XML files, store high value passwords in them so we can just look at the database like a black box. Then lets expose all that to the world of hackers and madmen and then act surprised when we discover its been broken into!

about 3 months ago
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End of an Era: After a 30 Year Run, IBM Drops Support For Lotus 1-2-3

FlyingGuy Re:Lotus 1-2-3 successor (156 comments)

And then that cock sucker Jim Manzi decided if you can't beat them with your software, take the massive cash you have in the bank and suit them into bankruptcy IN Boston with a hand picked Judge all nice and paid for. To this day, if I see him I will hit him square in the nose as hard as I can and dance over him while he bleeds.

Borland eventually won in court but not until after they had been bled of their cash to defend the suit and had sold Quattro of to Novell ( dumbest thing that Uncle Ray ever did perhaps except trusting Microsoft ) where it languished before being sold to Correl .

about 3 months ago
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Oracle CEO Larry Ellison Steps Down

FlyingGuy Re:Maybe just wishful thinking but... (142 comments)

I think that it is very context dependent. Think of it this way:

You have an instrument monitoring something, it is remote. You poll it every hour. In the first 10 hours you get some values. One of those values is zero (0) and that is a valid value for that particular measurement. In second 10 hours you notice you have some null's. Should I interpret those as zero or should I interpret those as no data acquired ?

I do know that Oracle will not count null values when doing any kind of averaging.

about 3 months ago
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Building Apps In Swift With Storyboards

FlyingGuy XCode aint there yet.... (69 comments)

As someone who is a programmer, but had never had an Apple Desktop or Laptop until my wife and son got me one for Christmas this pas year I have to say X-Code needs more polish.

I say this because I was / Am a heavy user of Delphi ( Yup Object Pascal ). You might think OP is a toy but you could not be more wrong, but that is another argument. What I can say definitively is that Borland and now Embarcadero know how to do an IDE better then just about anything I have ever seen.

Apple needs to take a page out of their playbook. In Delphi when you add a component to a form, it adds ALL the code that you need to the unit that is handling the form. A simple double click on the element adds the code shell for that particular action, either from the object browser or from the form. You simply write the code that makes that action do what it needs to do, nothing else.

Now contrast this with X-Code... It will let you drag a component onto a form, in iOS Mavericks or whatever, but after that you have to and start screwing around in .h files, adding this adding that just so that element will be recognized and will compile. Couple that with the syntax of Objective C and you have a program that can only be written by someone who fairly in-depth knowledge of Objective C. I mean not they should not have to have that knowledge but it should not be a requirement to do basic forms and the like.

As it is mentioned, using the "Story Board" concept you can only write very simple apps that don't accomplish a whole lot. So while Apple is getting there they have a lot of ground to cover.

about 3 months ago
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Expedition 42 ISS Crew Embraces Douglas Adams

FlyingGuy Re:The film sucked; the miniseries before it was g (39 comments)

The film did its level best to condense a really great book into 90 minutes. The actors were genuine, they really got into it and they took some of the themes and made them poignant yet not overly so.

While it will never be among the worlds best movies, it really did better than I have ever seen trying to take a book like HGTTG and give it cinematic life.

And their use of actual costumes ( created by the late Jim Hensen's company ) was so MUCH better than CGI. All in all it was a good film.

about 3 months ago
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The Raid-Proof Hosting Technology Behind 'The Pirate Bay'

FlyingGuy Re:Good job! (144 comments)

should be illegal unless you are the content creator.

A small problem with your idea. Who is "you" ? So if an author enters into an agreement to have his book made into a movie by say, The Disney Company who is the "content creator"? Is it the author? The screen writer?, The shareholders in Disney Stock? The CEO of Disney?

Lets say for instance you arcademan come up with a really cool video game that seems to be an absolute hit. Do you have the resources to put up a server farm that can distribute that content to the masses? Let's say I do and I put my considerable resources to work on your behalf for some fee per distributed unit. I really have no sure way of knowing if you will sell 100, 1000, 10000 or even a million units. So I want an exclusive agreement because I have made those resources available to you and therefor have tied those up.

about 3 months ago
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Oracle CEO Larry Ellison Steps Down

FlyingGuy Re:Let the hate fly! (142 comments)

I do not know either. Backwards compatibility perhaps? I do know that if you have written code and have used bit mapping ( INT AND 0xA23F4D ) and things like that you will more then likely run into to trouble ( in theory it should not matter since the number of bits is not shrinking ) when your INT goes from 32 bits to 64 bits and the same thing goes if you using any ROT commands so who knows.

about 3 months ago
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Oracle CEO Larry Ellison Steps Down

FlyingGuy Re:Let the hate fly! (142 comments)

I do not like auto correct and at times I miss its mangulation -- New word ?? ~giggle~

about 3 months ago
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Oracle CEO Larry Ellison Steps Down

FlyingGuy Re:Let the hate fly! (142 comments)

I am quite sure that this is true in a lot of spaces and I am quite sure the opposite is true in a lot of spaces.

That brings up another point though. Tuning a database... This is seeming to be a lost art. Over time I have witnessed what I think is an alarming trend of otherwise mostly competent developers wanting the database to just be a magic box. So much code has been written to hide the database, to turn it into objects that match oop models. Pick any of them, springDB, Hibernate et all. No one wants to recognize the database as being an integral part of a well thought out and balanced system. They simply want to throw a framework in front of it an attempt to ( poorly IMHO ) make it non existent when IMHO is the best place to implement the vast majority of business rules, but that is another discussion.

But back to your main point. As I said, if Oracle just sucked as a database it would not have the market share that it does and if DB2 ( a mighty fine DB in its own right ) was that much faster and better then it would have a much larger market share then it does. Each DB has it's own set of strengths and weaknesses and each one has its sweet spot.

about 3 months ago

Submissions

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Google caught abusing user privacy yet again!

FlyingGuy FlyingGuy writes  |  more than 2 years ago

FlyingGuy writes "The "Do No Evil" motto of Google was besmirched yet again when it revealed that it had coded around Apple's Safari web browser's privacy controls. Now one could accuse Apple of having lousy privacy controls but the idea that Google would deliberately code around what controls do exist is yet another black eye for Google. The Silicon Valley Mercury News reporter, M. Swift reports,

Google's (GOOG) admission late Thursday that it circumvented privacy controls in the web browsers of Apple (AAPL) iPhone and Mac users — the latest in a series of privacy breaches by the Internet giant — promises to plunge Google in even deeper problems with regulators scrutinizing the company's practices.

"

Link to Original Source
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HP Releases WebOS as Open Source

FlyingGuy FlyingGuy writes  |  about 3 years ago

FlyingGuy writes "HP today announced it will contribute the webOS software to the open source community.

HP plans to continue to be active in the development and support of webOS. By combining the innovative webOS platform with the development power of the open source community, there is the opportunity to significantly improve applications and web services for the next generation of devices."

Link to Original Source
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Isolated genes can be patented, court rules

FlyingGuy FlyingGuy writes  |  more than 3 years ago

FlyingGuy writes "The Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, which specializes in patent cases, said that Myriad Genetics was entitled to patents on two human genes used to predict whether women have an increased risk of getting breast and ovarian cancer."
Link to Original Source
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Air France Flight447 FDR & CVR Data Intact

FlyingGuy FlyingGuy writes  |  more than 3 years ago

FlyingGuy writes "Investigators trying to determine why an Air France plane crashed mysteriously two years ago have recovered the complete contents of the flight data recorder and the last two hours of cockpit conversation, they announced Monday."
Link to Original Source
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Drive By's and Malware

FlyingGuy FlyingGuy writes  |  about 4 years ago

FlyingGuy writes "Someplace back in the early days of browsers and such there must have been a point where someone who was building these programs must have said to themselves, "Self, wouldn't it be neat if you could automatically download files to anyplace on the machine and then execute them without the user having to bother saying it was ok."

Someone someplace on good ol' ./ has to have the inside scoop on this. More importantly someone has to have the scoop on why after the very first "Drive By" the code that allowed this was not ripped from the software with extreme prejudice!"

So whats the scoop ./ readers? Was it benignly intentional, was it naiveté or just plain stupid?"
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Samsung offers free phones to frustrated iPhone us

FlyingGuy FlyingGuy writes  |  more than 4 years ago

FlyingGuy writes "Samsung is taking a bold step in capitalizing on Apples troubles with the iPhone 4 and sending a free Galaxy S smartphone to iPhone 4 users. Talk about gorilla marketing!"
Link to Original Source
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Mark Zuckerberg is SO screwed

FlyingGuy FlyingGuy writes  |  more than 4 years ago

FlyingGuy writes "Facebook CEO and founder Mark Zuckerberg appears to be quite screwed according to the contract he signed 2003 with upstate New York wood-pellet vendor Paul Ceglia. The contract has very specific language that could in all likelihood hand over 84% of Facebook to Mr. Ceglia unless the courts can be convinced that it is either a forgery or the contract has somehow expired. Read the contract here for yourself but the salient bits are:
  • Buyer agrees to pay the seller the sum of $1,000 a piece for the work to be performed for StreetFax and $1,000 for the work to be performed for "The Face Book"...
  • The agreed upon completion for the expanded project with working title "The Face Book" shall be January 1 2004 and an additional 1% interest in the business will be due the buyer for each day the website is delayed from that date.
  • Additional funds may be provided for either project on an as needed basis at the sole discretion of the Buyer.
  • For "The Face Book" Seller [Mark Zuckerberg] agrees to act as the sites webmaster and to pay for all domain and hosting expenses from the funds received under this contract, and the Seller [Mark Zuckerberg] agrees that he will maintain control of these services at all times.
"

Link to Original Source
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Novell Board Declines Elliot's Offer

FlyingGuy FlyingGuy writes  |  more than 4 years ago

FlyingGuy writes "In an e-mail sent to partners and VARS ( of which I am one ), CEO Ron Hovsepian sent the the following:

Dear Valued Partner,

As you may know, on March 2nd, Elliott Associates, L.P. announced an unsolicited, conditional proposal to acquire Novell. Today we issued a press release announcing that our Board of Directors has concluded, after careful consideration, including a review of the proposal with its independent financial and legal advisors, that Elliott's proposal is inadequate and that it undervalues the Company's franchise and growth prospects.

Additionally, we announced that our Board has authorized a thorough review of various alternatives to enhance stockholder value.

Our relationship with you is extremely important to all of us at Novell, and I want to assure you that you can remain confident that we are committed to serving you as we always have. I also want to reaffirm to you that it remains business as usual at Novell, and we do not intend for there to be any changes in our relationship with you. Please do not hesitate to contact me or other members of our team at any time; we always strive to be available to provide you the best solutions for your needs.

On behalf of the Board and management team, I thank you for your ongoing commitment to Novell.

Sincerely,

Ron Hovsepian
President and CEO

"
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New Whitehouse website is a dog....

FlyingGuy FlyingGuy writes  |  more than 5 years ago

FlyingGuy writes "As I was browsing through through The Whitehouse web site I used the contact form to send a note of congratulations to the new President. I filled in the requires fields and then began typing my text. To my surprise I noticed the text lagging very badly as I typed.

Now given the web site I was accessing I knew that every click was being logged. I noted the comment form had a max char count of 500. This is simple enough to do in a little JS as I have done it many times. Yet for some reason my text was appearing with about a 5 second lag!

So i had a peak at the source and this is the JS function that I found:





      function counterUpdate(opt_countedTextBox, opt_countBody, opt_maxSize)
      {
            var countedTextBox = opt_countedTextBox ? opt_countedTextBox : "counttxt";
            var countBody = opt_countBody ? opt_countBody : "countBody";
            var maxSize = opt_maxSize ? opt_maxSize : 500;

            var field = document.getElementById(countedTextBox);

            if (field && field.value.length >= maxSize)
            {
                  field.value = field.value.substring(0, maxSize);
            }

            var txtField = document.getElementById(countBody);

            if (txtField)
            {
                  txtField.innerHTML = maxSize — field.value.length;
            }
      }


Now to me this sems just a bit over the top for a simple counter / truncate mechanism It would seem to me to be better implemented thusly:



      function counterUpdate(field,maxSize,sizeLabel)
      {
            var countedField = document.getElementById(countedTextBox);
            var countLabel = document.getElementById(sizelabel);
            var currentSize = countedField.value.length
            if(currentSize >= maxSize){
                  countedField.value = countedField.value.substring(0,maxSize);
            }

            countLabel.value = currentSize ;

      }

I tested the site on a SLES box running FF 2.x and a windows box running FF 3.x and both showed the same very poor performance. Am I missing something here? I did not test my suggested replacement,"
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A Linux workstation for <b>Business</b>

FlyingGuy FlyingGuy writes  |  more than 6 years ago

FlyingGuy writes "So 2009 may or may not be the year of the Linux Desktop, but let us for sake of argument say it is.

Now keeping in mind that the vast majority of business users are not what anyone would define as a power users since they are mostly just general workers, secretaries, order takers, line workers that do a set number of tasks, often repeatedly, in reality they are just users.

Keeping in mind that management always wants the smallest IT budget they can get away with, they want lots of uptime, peace in the rank and file and the minimum amount of calls to the help desk.

Keeping in mind that IT for the most part wants to set up a machine with the applications required to do the job maybe a few extras like multi-media and chat but not much more. Obviously Open Office fits in here, perhaps Novell's GroupWise or IBM's Office Suite aka Lotus and some other stuff and they want to plop it down and forget about it since they have a ton of other shite to get done

Considering this will be compared to a typical Windows Workstation, what does the collective wisdom of /. think would satisfy the following requirements:
  1. As user proof as possible
  2. As compatible as possible
  3. As secure as possible
  4. At least one RAD Tool
  5. As remotely Manageable as possible with a GUI

Now FOSS is cool, but there are somethings you just have to pay for, support, specialized versions of software, etc. so don't make cost a very big part of your process. Keep in mind these business are more then likely not going to want hire support people that can build the kernel or Open Office or anything else that takes more then typing make with probably less then one page of large type instructions.

So with that in mind, and trying not to be too awfully distro centric, what is the best combination of tools for both support and user to make a Linux desktop for business that will make the grade?

P.S. I like humor as much as the next guy, but this is a serious question. Linux needs to forge ahead onto the desktop if we are to continue our march, so please some serious answers."

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IBM and Novell pair a Mid-Level Z system with SLES

FlyingGuy FlyingGuy writes  |  more than 6 years ago

FlyingGuy writes "Novell has released a version of SLES ( SuSe Linux Enterprise Server ) for the IMB Z Series of mid-sized mainframes.

Designed as a powerful, entry-level version of the IBM System z10 Enterprise Class (z10 EC) mainframe announced earlier this year, the IBM z10 BC provides small to mid-sized clients with all the unique attributes of an IBM mainframe.

For customers seeking server consolidation options to cut costs, the IBM z10 BC delivers the capacity equivalent of up to 230 x86 servers, with 83% smaller footprint, up to 93% lower energy costs, and a much higher level of security, control and automation--allowing for up to 100% utilization. In a business climate of mergers, acquisitions and cost-cutting pressures, server consolidation brings improved standardization, security, management and facilities utilizations."

Link to Original Source
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Is the once mighty Moto headed for the scrap heap?

FlyingGuy FlyingGuy writes  |  more than 6 years ago

FlyingGuy writes "Coming on the heals of a year that saw Motorola lose 1.2 billion and phone sales drop by 33% there are apparently plans afoot to split the once mighty giant and spin off the phone business. BBC News is running this brief article quoting the new CEO and Carl Ichon.

Is this just casting off dead wood, or could this possibly result in a leaner and more aggressive handset manufacturer no long encumbered by the stodginess of the once mighty giant? Does the Motorola brand have any real cache left?"
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FlyingGuy FlyingGuy writes  |  more than 7 years ago

FlyingGuy writes "As reported by the BBC News Internet Service Provider TISCALI has been hit by a massive SPAM wave, resulting in mail failure for a great many of its 1.8 million customers.

Interestingly enough Spamhaus does not see a major problem. FTA:

Spamhaus is certainly not seeing anything that would justify major blocking, unless it is being targeted at one or two specific networks.
"
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FlyingGuy FlyingGuy writes  |  more than 8 years ago

FlyingGuy (989135) writes "The founder of Ubuntu, Mark Shuttleworth, has apparently decided to take on Microsoft directly.

CNN is quoting [www.cnn.com] him as saying, "Ultimately open source is the platform of the future,".

Could this be a preulude to an all out battle between Ubuntu and Microsoft? What do you think the outcome will be?"
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FlyingGuy FlyingGuy writes  |  more than 8 years ago

FlyingGuy writes "MacWorld UK is reporting that Open Office will be a Native Mac Application [macworld.co.uk].

Mac users now have an Office Production Application that has all the features and cross-platform capabilty that will allow them to truely be native document portable.

Is this yet another direct hit on MS's Office Suit? Now not being a Mac user myself, although I will buy one for my son when he gets a little older, I understood that even between like versions of the MS Office Suit that were fairly glaring discrepencies when moving from Mac to Windows or the reverse. Has this finally given the two camps a universal translator?"
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FlyingGuy FlyingGuy writes  |  more than 8 years ago

FlyingGuy (989135) writes "According to CNN Money [money.cnn.com] Google CEO Eric Schmidt has joined the Board of Directors of Apple Computer, Inc.

"Like Apple, Google is very focused on innovation and we think Eric's insights and experience will be very valuable in helping to guide Apple in the years ahead," Apple CEO Steve Jobs said in a statement.

Is it just another buddy buddy, "You be my pal on my board, or are Apple & Google planning somthing long or near term?

Steve ( nuttin up my sleve ) Jobs has long been known for not tipping his hand when he has something new and exciting cooking up. Could this be a change in that behavior? Could this mean that Goolge & Apple are teaming up to wage the inevitable war that must happen with the folks from Remond?

Whats your take on this bit of news?"

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