×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Theo De Raadt's Small Rant On OpenSSL

G3ckoG33k not developed by a responsible team? (301 comments)

De Raadt wrote "OpenSSL is not developed by a responsible team".

On the contrary, I believe it was developed by a responsible team, that unfortunately made an error.

Most everyone have made errors, even if most go unnoticed and are essentially harmless. This one appears different, but I don't think it justifies De Raadt's moronic comment.

about a week ago
top

Why Did New Zealand's Moas Go Extinct?

G3ckoG33k I'm fed up with romanticized natives (180 comments)

Over the last few centuries there has been a stereotypically romanticized view of the natives in the jungles and grass plains around the world as living in harmony with the nature, until the white man came. That pathetic misconception is perpetuated by their old wise men, typically alcoholics and in turn romanticizing anything from their grandfathers childhood. Good to see some white man high-tech arguments pointing fingers at the scum who'd better invent their own refrigerators before complaining. I'm fed up with romanticized natives.

about a month ago
top

Oldest Known Star In the Universe Discovered

G3ckoG33k Re:Could the universe be much older than estimated (141 comments)

One other reason I think this sounds "very little" is that heavy elements need a successive series of star formations to be formed. So, 18 laps for the Sun since the dawn of the universe, as Patch86 mentioned, also sounds too few. No, I don't have any better hypothesis. Yet, perhaps we are seeing a logarithmically contracted time scale once we look back in time and that such a phenomenon produce these effects.

about 2 months ago
top

Oldest Known Star In the Universe Discovered

G3ckoG33k Could the universe be much older than estimated? (141 comments)

The age of the universe is according to Wikipedia

"In physical cosmology, the age of the universe is the time elapsed since the Big Bang. The best measurement of the age of the universe is 13.798±0.037 billion years ((13.798±0.037)×109 years or (4.354±0.012)×1017 seconds) within the Lambda-CDM concordance model.[1][2] The uncertainty of 37 million years has been obtained by the agreement of a number of scientific research projects, such as microwave background radiation measurements by the Planck satellite, the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe and other probes. Measurements of the cosmic background radiation give the cooling time of the universe since the Big Bang,[2] and measurements of the expansion rate of the universe can be used to calculate its approximate age by extrapolating backwards in time."

Still, the Sun rotates around the Milky Way center at a rate of every 240 million years; "Sun's Galactic rotation period 240 Myr (negative rotation)" according to Sparks 2007. Well, does that mean that the sun only has rotated around the Milky Way some 60 times (four times every billion years), since Big Bang? That sounds very little. Could the universe be much older than estimated?!

about 2 months ago
top

A Thermodynamics Theory of the Origins of Life

G3ckoG33k Re:Not new (185 comments)

You called me out, and ... I had forgotten I still need to keep my Dunning-Kruger syndrome at bay.

about 3 months ago
top

A Thermodynamics Theory of the Origins of Life

G3ckoG33k Re:Not new (185 comments)

Can anyone with more info on this tell me how this earlier paper is different - arxiv.org/abs/0907.0042

I certainly don't pretend to understand the content of the England/Michaelian papers.

But after a quick scan of Michaelian's paper, I think the difference might be that England's paper rigorously quantifies the theory mathematically, while Michaelian's paper does not.

One should check with xarchive.org (and elsewhere) which ip-addresses have visited Michaelians' article.

A few years back some Spanish researchers were caught tapping original data

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/09...

"But now evidence has been offered that Dr. Ortiz and his group did access the observing logs. Prompted by questions by Dr. Rabinowitz of Yale, one of Dr. Brown's team members, Dr. Pogge, who maintains the Smarts telescope Web site, decided to investigate the traffic on the site. He found that computers from an unfamiliar address had visited the Web site eight times from July 26 to 28, when the Spanish group was making its announcement. Each time the computers went straight to pages deep within the site that described the Brown group's observations of K40506A. The first three visits happened a few minutes apart early on July 26, a day and a half before the Ortiz group made its announcement. Another cluster of hits came on the morning of the July 28 before the object was observed in Mallorca and Dr. Ortiz made his more complete report to the astronomical union. Dr. Pogge was able to trace the computers through the so-called IPP numbers, which the Internet assigns to each computer on it. Those numbers eventually led him to the Web site of the Andalusian Institute. Dr. Pogge said he gasped out loud when it popped up."

These things happen.

Nonetheless, Jeremy L England's article is plain sloppy research for not finding Michaelian's paper.

about 3 months ago
top

A Thermodynamics Theory of the Origins of Life

G3ckoG33k Re:Not new (185 comments)

The difference is that Jeremy L England has more influential friends within media.

about 3 months ago
top

In Greece, 10 Months In Prison For "Blasphemous" Facebook Page

G3ckoG33k Serious matter (324 comments)

Yeah, this is serious matter

[/satire]

about 2 months ago
top

Google Removes "Search Nearby" Function From Updated Google Maps

G3ckoG33k I have never used it - it also cluttered the maps (255 comments)

"300 posts to the Google Product Forums "

How many people work at the Google Product Office? Probably more than 300. 300 is not enough people to be labeled more than a blip on anyone's it-radar. Perhaps they were astroturfing.

about 3 months ago
top

Intel Dev: GTK's Biggest Problem, and What Qt Does Better

G3ckoG33k Windows 8 (282 comments)

Windows 8 (and the entire Windows 8.x by extension) may be the prime example of that.

That interface on a desktop computer may be worse than anything else built by Microsoft.

about 3 months ago
top

Why Standard Deviation Should Be Retired From Scientific Use

G3ckoG33k Yes, use the interquartile range instead (312 comments)

Yes, use the interquartile range instead https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interquartile_range

It is like the median a very robust method, not readily influenced by outliers. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Median

The median is wickedly robust, with a breakdown point at 50%, meaning that you can throw a huge a mount of junk data at it and it still doesn't care.

The arithmetic mean and the standatd deviation are both junk, often worse than the too-often-assumed-normal data thrown at it.

about 3 months ago
top

Sherlock Holmes Finally In the Public Domain In the US

G3ckoG33k Donald Duck, here we come - a few more years (207 comments)

Hmmm. A Donald Duck pr0n version?

Wait, a pr0n version of Sherlock and Wa..., err, John Holmes? A century worth of speculations is over?

about 4 months ago
top

What Would It Cost To Build a Windows Version of the Pricey New Mac Pro?

G3ckoG33k The Steam Box, a Gabe Newell subsidized bargain! (804 comments)

In a similar vein, there is a Gamespot.com comparison of the Steam Box price versus the retail prices of the parts:

http://www.gamespot.com/articles/steam-machine-teardown-reveals-1300-price-for-components/1100-6416814/

"The sum of the system's various components--including its processor, motherboard, and hard drive--came out to around $1300. The most expensive component was its Zotac GeForce GTX 780 3GB video card--estimated at more than $500. It's important to note that the 300 Steam Machine units available today for beta testers are prototype systems. Specifications, and thus price, could change before the system launches publicly in 2014. It's also important to remember that several boxes will be available, featuring an array of specifications and price points. We've asked Valve to comment on the $1300 price point, but haven't heard back."

The Steam Box, a Gabe Newell subsidized bargain or will they just minimize profit as can be done to gain traction? Newell vs Jobs, I sense a difference.

(BTW, I still think Apple sucks, even if I have to admit the new Mac Pro design is nice.)

about 4 months ago
top

What computing device do you use most while on vacation?

G3ckoG33k Re: On vacations I sail (140 comments)

Holing a gunk?

about 4 months ago
top

US Spying Costs Boeing Military Jet Deal With Brazil

G3ckoG33k Gripen in Libya: 650 combat mission (439 comments)

From defencetalk.com (http://www.defencetalk.com/mission-completed-swedish-gripen-back-from-libya-37964/)

Gripen in Libya: "650 combat missions, almost 2,000 flight hours and more than 150,000 reconnaissance photos"

So, it does have some real-life experience too

about 3 months ago
top

Bitcoin Inventor Satoshi Nakamoto Could Actually Be Group From Europe

G3ckoG33k Re:Hey, let's speculate! (186 comments)

Those facts make it sound like some "Anonymous Coward" on Slashdot. What if we all are suspects here at Slashdot?

about 4 months ago
top

Valve Releases Debian-Based SteamOS Beta

G3ckoG33k Imagine if they had chosen Shuttleworth's os (211 comments)

Imagine if they had chosen Shuttleworth's os. Now they still support his os, but also many more, apart from itself.

Hail Debian, the mothership.

about 4 months ago
top

EU Warns Nokia Not To Become a Patent Troll

G3ckoG33k Speaking of Finntroll (78 comments)

Here is their most popular video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yGywo81G6lk

and the Wikipedia entry https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Finntroll

"Finntroll is a folk metal band from Helsinki, Finland. They combine elements of black metal and folk metal. Finntroll's lyrics are mostly in Swedish, the only exception being the song "Madon Laulu" on Visor Om Slutet. Finntroll's first singer Katla decided to use Swedish over Finnish since he was part of a Swedish-speaking minority in Finland and the sound of the language seemed to better suit the band's "trollish" outfit. Despite several vocalist changes, this tradition has continued. According to bandmembers Vreth and Skrymer, they took their name from an old Finnish legend where Swedish priests coming to Finland had an encounter with a wild-looking man who killed most of their party. The survivors came back bearing the tale of the Finn-Troll."

about 4 months ago
top

Need Directions? Might Not Want To Ask a Transit Rider

G3ckoG33k Is it any good to know (97 comments)

the street names above your head, on the street level? Or the distances between them? People may well just like to doze off, ignoring seriously irrelevant pieces of information.

Did these "cognitively active travelers" also know the telephones of those lived along their sublime subway line? Is the distance in miles or kilometers even a useful metric for distance in L.A.? In my mind minutes would be more useful. If these "cognitively active travelers" had been travelling these roads by car or bicycle before, yes. Of course they know them better than those who hadn't. What a flawed analysis to begin with. Why didn't the compare with people from Tokya and Ghana to see what their impressions were...

These "cognitively active travelers" sound like nut cases ready for Rainman 2. Maybe they should also include the authors of the actual article - Andrew M., Evelyn B. and Brian T.

about 4 months ago

Submissions

top

Fit teenagers less likely to suffer from depression as adults

G3ckoG33k G3ckoG33k writes  |  about 2 years ago

G3ckoG33k (647276) writes "A study of more than a million men reveals that good physical fitness at the age of 18 is associated with a reduced risk of serious depression later in life. Previous studies have shown that a sedentary lifestyle increases the risk of depression, but most of these have been based on interviews with adults. The study covers men born between 1950 and 1987 in good mental health on enlisting for military service. For these 1,117,292 men, the researchers compared the results of physical tests at the time of enlistment with national disease registers. Separate analyses were performed to allow for reverse causality – in other words the possibility of very early symptoms of depression leading to reduced fitness in the physical tests. But even after taking this into account, there were still the same associations. Even more remarkable is that the increase in risk could be observed up to 40 years later. By undertaking a special analysis of the roughly 380.000 brothers covered by the study, the researchers were also able to rule out environmental and hereditary factors. So, slashdotters, how fit were you when you were 18?"
Link to Original Source
top

What is C++ AMP, really?

G3ckoG33k G3ckoG33k writes  |  about 2 years ago

G3ckoG33k (647276) writes "I read an article in The Inquirer: "However Robinson believes that more tools will mean better support of OpenCL on both Windows and Linux. Robinson said, "Now with the proliferation of OpenCL and certainly with the introduction of C++ AMP by Microsoft, you are seeing the actual tipping point where you've got a development environment, especially with C++ or OpenCL, whatever they [developers] want to choose and that makes much more sense. But we've got a bit more work to do with the Linux environment to open this up to workstations, but based on the success we've seen in the consumer it gives us the momentum in those areas." I had never heard of C++ AMP and on MS webpage it stands for "C++ Accelerated Massive Parallelism". But what is it really and is it any good?"
Link to Original Source
top

Chinese researchers map family names

G3ckoG33k G3ckoG33k writes  |  about 2 years ago

G3ckoG33k (647276) writes "Chinese researchers have mapped the occurrence of family names down to a county level and will proceed matching them with genetic data. From the article: "Last names are handy for more than constructing family trees—they can also trace population connections and movements across and between countries. Researchers in China recently mapped the country's so-called isonymy structure, which shows how likely people are to share their last name with those around them. The resulting patchwork matches patterns of ethnic distribution and tracks some of China's historic migrations, such as the diversity of people who settled in the Yangtze River basin over many centuries. ". Is this just intriguing science or is it a new step towards a higher level of racism. Imagine... Oh wait, we already have Facebook (www.facebook.com) and the White Pages (http://www.whitepages.com/)."
Link to Original Source
top

New plans for two cold fusion plants

G3ckoG33k G3ckoG33k writes  |  about 2 years ago

G3ckoG33k (647276) writes "The cold fusion inventor, Andreas Rossi, wrote "We have already made all the engineering of the production line in the two factories we will set up (one in the USA, one in Europe) and we will have just to set up the software of the robots and fix the drawings after the requirements of the Certificators. I think that it will take from 6 to 12 months after the certifications will be done to start the production." Is this credible? Or is it just the greatest scam on Earth?"
Link to Original Source
top

Two-dimensional glass, three atoms thick, now free-standing

G3ckoG33k G3ckoG33k writes  |  more than 2 years ago

G3ckoG33k (647276) writes "'Researchers have created the world's thinnest pane of glass—and it looks oddly familiar. The glass, made of silicon and oxygen, formed accidentally when the scientists were making graphene, an atom-thick sheet of carbon, on copper-covered quartz. They believe an air leak caused the copper to react with the quartz, which is also made of silicon and oxygen, producing a glass layer with the graphene.' This shows how 'accidents' are important for improving technology."
Link to Original Source
top

Numb and tingly fingers

G3ckoG33k G3ckoG33k writes  |  more than 2 years ago

G3ckoG33k (647276) writes "Since a few days, with way too many hours in front of the keyboard, I started to get numb and tingly fingers. Have you ever been there? So, I googled and found someone with my symptoms: "The little finger and ring finger of my left-hand has been constantly semi-numb and tingly for two or three weeks. I was beginning to think I might have a serious bloodflow problem...". Just as I have done (until I read his post), that guy had had the bad habit of propping his left elbow on the desk and leaning the chin on his left hand for support when he browsed around on the PC... Has anyone else had symptoms related to PC usage? Maybe one could reduce symptoms like these just by making people aware of them!"
Link to Original Source
top

AMD Bulldozer sets world record, 8.4 GHz

G3ckoG33k G3ckoG33k writes  |  more than 2 years ago

G3ckoG33k (647276) writes ""8429.38MHz is the new CPU Frequency World Record claimed by a near-production desktop version of AMD’s FX Bulldozer CPU! Overclockers.com witnessed the event first hand in Austin, TX at AMD Headquarters on August 31st during an AMD FX pre-launch briefing, and the record is set to be confirmed by the Guinness Book of World Records and HWBot.org. [...] But what does it really mean? The world record feat brings us a lot of excitement about the possibilities for Bulldozer, but we still should be asking what it really means. In recent years, the game of high frequency records was the sole domain of Intel processors, and only about 20 of their chips have ever recorded tipping the scale at over 8GHz though hundreds of overclockers have tried for years. But even Intel hasn’t had any current generation contenders on this playing field; Intel’s best record was set just last month on August 12th, 2011 when TaPaKaH hit 8308.94MHz on an old Cedar Mill chip.""
Link to Original Source
top

I screwed a moderation point...

G3ckoG33k G3ckoG33k writes  |  more than 2 years ago

G3ckoG33k (647276) writes "Let it be known, I screwed a moderation point, and due to a new keyboard... It doesn't have exactly the same feel and touch to it, so, I inadvertantly gave a bollocks remark high scores. No, I don't remember which it was. I just recall WTF did I just recommend... FI"
top

The US and the Nazi, both have their Dr Mengele

G3ckoG33k G3ckoG33k writes  |  more than 2 years ago

G3ckoG33k (647276) writes "The U.S. Public Health Service conducted a study from 1946 to 1948 in which near 700 prisoners, soldiers and patients with emotional and mental problems were purposefully infected with syphilis. That rivals in cruelty those experiments performed by the now infamous Dr. Mengel of the nazi camps. President Obama has apologized publicly for the event. This is extraordinary as these event occurred with WWII in memory."
Link to Original Source
top

A new, 6000 km river just discovered

G3ckoG33k G3ckoG33k writes  |  more than 2 years ago

G3ckoG33k (647276) writes "For some reason a 6000 km river has been undiscovered until now. The reason is obvious, it is subterranean and lies beneath the Amazon river. An article in The Guardian describes how "scientists have found a new river in the Amazon basin – around 4km underneath the Amazon river. The Rio Hamza, named after the head of the team of researchers who found the groundwater flow, appears to be as long as the Amazon river but up to hundreds of times wider. Both the Amazon and Hamza flow from west to east and are around the same length, at 6,000km. But whereas the Amazon ranges from 1km to 100km in width, the Hamza ranges from 200km to 400km. The underground river starts in the Acre region under the Andes and flows through the Solimões, Amazonas and Marajó basins before opening out directly into the depths of the Atlantic Ocean." and how "researchers used a mathematical model to predict the presence of the underground river, based on the measured changes in temperature down the wells. In the presentation, Piementel said that the flow of groundwater was almost vertical through the rocks to depths of around 2,000m. After this, the water flow changes direction and becomes almost horizontal." It is amazing how much there is left to discover, on Earth!"
Link to Original Source
top

Fastest Ski-box on Earth

G3ckoG33k G3ckoG33k writes  |  about 3 years ago

G3ckoG33k (647276) writes "The Koenigsegg Agera R (unveiled last month) is not only a contender for the epithet Fastest Car In The World, some say it is also one of the most beautiful. If that is not enough, it also has as an optional, purposefully and aerodynamically designed ski-box by Thule, validated for speeds up to 300 km/h. Here is a video of a test drive by a Swedish journalist in a wintery landscape. Even if if you don't understand his language, his flabbergasted smiles should be universal."
Link to Original Source
top

Fact free science is on the move. Beware!

G3ckoG33k G3ckoG33k writes  |  more than 3 years ago

G3ckoG33k (647276) writes "Fact free science is not a joke, it is very much on the move and it is quite possibly the most dangerous movement in centuries, for the entire mankind. One can say it began as counter-movement to Karl Popper's ground-breaking proposals in the early 20th century, which insisted that statements purporting to describe the reality should be made falsifiable. A few decades later some critics of Popper said that statements need peer acceptance, which then makes also natural science a social phenomenon. Even later, in 1996, professor Alan Sokal submitted a famous article ridiculing the entire anti-science movement. Now New York Times has an article describing the latest chilling acts of the social relativistic postmodern loons. It is a chilling read, and they may be swinging both the political left and right. Have they been successful in transforming the world yet? How would we know?"
Link to Original Source
top

35,000 Linux benchmarks in a week

G3ckoG33k G3ckoG33k writes  |  more than 3 years ago

G3ckoG33k (647276) writes "Openbenchmarking.org has received 37,027 benchmarks (mainly Linux, and some Macs) in the first week since its inauguration. 241,384 completed tests using 468,344 components from 438 hardware vendors. All results submitted by end users. I guess the hardware support for Linux must become even better thanks to this effort. Yes, the benchmarks are easy to install and run, and you can readily compare your own system anonymously with the results already submitted, using any or all of hundreds of free applications in 47 categories."
Link to Original Source
top

The wheel, invented once again?!

G3ckoG33k G3ckoG33k writes  |  more than 3 years ago

G3ckoG33k (647276) writes "If you thought you knew that the "wheel" had already been invented, think again. There is an Italian company that has designed a new exercise bike which looks more like a wheel than any other exercise bike you have seen. It is of course made in composite material and would probably be Darth Vader's bike of choice. The design is spectacular. Laminated kevlar would probably be robust enough for armchair athletes like me too. There is also a video of it."
Link to Original Source
top

The wheel, invented once again?!

G3ckoG33k G3ckoG33k writes  |  more than 3 years ago

G3ckoG33k (647276) writes "If you thought you knew that the "wheel" had already been invented, think again. There is an Italian company that has designed a new exercise bike which looks more like a wheel than any other exercise bike you have seen. It is of course made in composite material and would probably be Darth Vader's bike of choice. The design is spectacular. Laminated kevlar would probably be robust enough for armchair athletes like me too. There is also a video of it."
Link to Original Source
top

The wheel, invented once again?!

G3ckoG33k G3ckoG33k writes  |  more than 3 years ago

G3ckoG33k (647276) writes "If you thought you knew that the "wheel" had already been invented, think again. There is an Italian company that has designed a new exercise bike which looks more like a wheel than any other exercise bike you have seen. It is of course made in composite material and would probably be Darth Vaders bike of choice. The design is spectacular. Laminated kevlar would probably be robust enough for armchair athletes like me too. There is also a video of it."
Link to Original Source
top

The Ultimate nerd site?

G3ckoG33k G3ckoG33k writes  |  more than 3 years ago

G3ckoG33k (647276) writes "I guess there are more aspects of nerdiness than many wish to admit. Still, whenever I wish indulge in my own lack of extrovert stamina I visit the Metamath web page. Their "Proof Explorer" is described as "Inspired by Whitehead and Russell's monumental Principia Mathematica, the Metamath Proof Explorer has over 8,000 completely worked out proofs, starting from the very foundation that mathematics is built on and eventually arriving at familiar mathematical facts and beyond. Each proof is pieced together with razor-sharp precision using a simple substitution rule that practically anyone (with lots of patience) can follow, not just mathematicians. Every step can be drilled down deeper and deeper into the labyrinth until axioms of logic and set theory — the starting point for all of mathematics — will ultimately be found at the bottom. You could spend literally days exploring the astonishing tangle of logic leading, say, from the seemingly mundane theorem 2+2=4 back to these axioms. Essentially everything that is possible to know in mathematics can be derived from a handful of axioms known as Zermelo-Fraenkel set theory, which is the culmination of many years of effort to isolate the essential nature of mathematics and is one of the most profound achievements of mankind. " How can you not just love it?!"
Link to Original Source
top

BP and Transocean must use relief wells?

G3ckoG33k G3ckoG33k writes  |  more than 3 years ago

G3ckoG33k (647276) writes "Like many others I had heard about the Ixtoc Mexican Gulf oil spill from 31 years ago. The company drilling in 1979 was Sedco, later known as Transocean, which is the operator contracted by BP for the Deepwater Horizon. Now, an 8 minute YouTube clip with original 1979 footage summarizes "All of the techniques now being used to plug the oil spill in the Deepwater Horizon disaster were tried 31 years ago with Ixtoc I and they failed. It was only when relief wells were drilled 9 months after the disaster began that the Ixtoc spill could be capped." So, it is BP and Transocean. So, when will they get those relief wells in place?! Who is betting on 2011?"
Link to Original Source
top

Windows 7 faster than Mac OS X on Apple hardware

G3ckoG33k G3ckoG33k writes  |  more than 3 years ago

G3ckoG33k (647276) writes "Phoronix has tested Windows 7 vs Ubuntu vs Mac OS, and made the conclusion "Microsoft Windows 7 x64 was significantly faster than Mac OS X 10.6.3 on Apple's very own hardware". Ubuntu came out in the middle. How much of a flamebait isn't that?! Is it time for yet another flamewar?"
Link to Original Source
top

Hasselblad cameras from 1957 get 39 Mepapixels

G3ckoG33k G3ckoG33k writes  |  more than 3 years ago

G3ckoG33k (647276) writes "An article at The Register Hardware describes how Hasselblad film cameras dating back to 1957 can be brought to a new life using a digital "back-end" to get images at a super resolution of 39 Megapixels! The article writes "The CFV-39 digital back allows you to get those cameras out from the last century and use the V-System cameras with their beautiful glass once again, it simply fits in place of where the roll film used to be. Hasselblads have never been inexpensive, but talk about a return on investment. Here is a manufacturer looking after a fiercely loyal user-base and along with it offering what could be seen as the ultimate green camera system." Oh, by the way most pictures taken during the Apollo space program in the 1960s were taken with Hasselblad."
Link to Original Source

Journals

G3ckoG33k has no journal entries.

Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...