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Journalist Sues NSA For Keeping Keith Alexander's Financial History Secret

Geoffrey.landis Form 278 [Re:What is the story here ] (177 comments)

Typically financial disclosures, such as the ones covered by OGE Form 450 (Confidential Financial Disclosure Report), are not public information and are exempted from FOIA requests

The form in question isn't the 450, which is confidential (hence its name). It's form 278, "Public Financial Disclosure", which is public (hence its name.
From http://www.oge.gov/Financial-D...

Public Financial Disclosure

The Ethics in Government Act of 1978, as amended, requires senior officials in the executive, legislative and judicial branches to file public reports of their finances as well as other interests outside the Government. The statute and the U.S. Office of Government Ethics's (OGE) regulations specify which officials in the executive branch file an OGE Form 278. Unlike confidential financial statements filed by some mid-level employees, the OGE 278 is available to the public. Reviewing officials within each agency certify and maintain these reports. Agencies do, however, forward reports of Presidential appointees confirmed by the Senate and certain other reports to OGE for additional review and certification.

yesterday
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Opportunity Rover Sets Off-World Driving Record

Geoffrey.landis Re:Apollo 11 (46 comments)

So they can photograph wheel tracks on the moons surface? It should then be a snap (pun intended) to take a pic of the Apollo 11 landing site and put that conspiracy to rest once and for all.

Uh, you think that people will believe that the entire moon landing program was faked, a hoax going on from 1968 (Apollo 8) through 1972 (Apollo 17), with tens of thousands of photographs, live television, and movies; with hundreds of thousands of people involved, and watched in minute detail by a hostile superpower (the USSR) that was ready to devote its entire resources to discrediting America... but you think these same people would instantly believe a photograph from Lunar Reconaissance Orbiter, because satellite photos can't be faked?

2 days ago
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Opportunity Rover Sets Off-World Driving Record

Geoffrey.landis Re:planet (46 comments)

The moon is not another planet. The JPL site has the correct information.

The headline has the correct phrasing: the rover has set the off-world driving record.

2 days ago
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'Optical Fiber' Made Out of Thin Air

Geoffrey.landis Invention that makes beams do what they do anyway (115 comments)

So the channel itself... has the diffraction, scattering, and beam spread of an unchanneled beam.

The beams making the channel are channeled by themselves, they create filaments that self-focus the beam. Self-focusing beams in air have been pretty well established at this point and will go quite far if you have enough power because of the attenuation involved.

So, what you just said is that the beams self-channel anyway.

So, if beams self-channel, this innovation does nothing, right? It's a complicated system of multiple beams to make the beam channel, which is to say, self-focus. But you just told me "self-focusing beams in air have been pretty well established at this point."

about a week ago
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'Optical Fiber' Made Out of Thin Air

Geoffrey.landis Little, as far as I can tell [But what does it do? (115 comments)

air is not transparent

To the extent that air is not transparent, this doesn't work.

and does cause beam scattering.

This does not address beam scattering. If the air is scattering the laser beam, it still scatters the beam.

by creating a refractive channel like this they absolutely will reduce beam dispersion.

It would reduce beam spread... except that the beams that create the channel are not themselves channeled.

obviously it doesn't eliminate beam spread

on this we agree

but even a fiber channel perfectly designed for a single mode will have some diffusion so whats your point?

My point is that from a surface-level analysis, it doesn't do anything useful.

they may be able to increase snr by 10^4 over current technologies at 100 m. that's a serious improvement that shouldn't simply be dismissed so thoughtlessly.

Let me repeat. The beams that create the channel are not themselves channeled. So the channel itself... has the diffraction, scattering, and beam spread of an unchanneled beam. The net result can't be better than an unchanneled beam, because it is made out of an unchanneled beam.

about a week ago
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'Optical Fiber' Made Out of Thin Air

Geoffrey.landis But what does it do? (115 comments)

I'm puzzled as to what this does or what it's good for, exactly.

... they have turned thin air into an "optical fiber" that can transmit and amplify light signals without the need for any cables.

1. Air already transmits light signals. It's transparent.
2. They haven't mentioned anything about amplifying light signals. This would be hard.

So, they are creating a "pipe" that can transmit light... but it doesn't stop beam spread (since the beams that make up the "pipe" still have diffraction-limited beam spread), and it can't bend light around corners. So, they now have a pipe that will funnel a laser beam along the path made by other laser beams, which take it exactly the same path that the beam would go without the pipe...

about a week ago
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Cosmologists Show Negative Mass Could Exist In Our Universe

Geoffrey.landis Not antigrav but still useful [Re: Negative ma...] (214 comments)

I might be made fun of for this but I'll ask anyway: If negative mass could be practically harnessef, would it allow for the antigravity/repulsorlift/mass effect technology of science fiction to be real?

Well, if you load your positive-mass vehicle up with an amount of negative mass, it will still fall downward, but it will have less overall mass and less weight. So it will only take a little amount of force to lift it or move it around.

The "if negative mass could be practically harnessed" is a big "if," though. Even aside from the fact that you have to figure out how to make negative mass.

about two weeks ago
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Cosmologists Show Negative Mass Could Exist In Our Universe

Geoffrey.landis Negative matter repels ordinary matter (214 comments)

Not so fast! Let me quote the GP:

Negative mass reacts oppositely to both gravity and intertia. Oddly, that means that negative mass still falls down in a gravitational field: The gravitational force is opposite, but negative mass responds negatively to force (a=F/m, where both F and m are negative). So negative mass particles repel each other gravitationally, but are attracted to positive mass objects.

Right

In other words, unlike normal matter, negative mass matter can never lump together under influence of gravitational force,

Right

but it will nevertheless attract normal matter.

You'd think, if it behaved like ordinary matter, that if it is attracted to positive matter, than it would conversely also attract positive matter. But no.

Negative matter particles attract each other, as you say, but repel normal matter. (They're attracted to it... but they repel it.)

The equations are: F = ma
and F = G mM/r^2

about two weeks ago
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Cosmologists Show Negative Mass Could Exist In Our Universe

Geoffrey.landis Pauli Exclusion [Re:Negative mass is weird] (214 comments)

Ah, the

Pauli exclusion

principle. IANA physicist, but I've never been happy with this here thingy.

Fortunately, your happiness is not relevant to whether physics works.

...
Oh, BTW - this is just one of many examples where science does, in fact, depend on pure faith.

No, this is one of the many examples where science depends on pure observation. The Pauli exclusion principle was first arrived at from observations, and only somewhat later was the theoretical basis-- the spin-statistics theorem-- worked out.

about two weeks ago
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Cosmologists Show Negative Mass Could Exist In Our Universe

Geoffrey.landis Re:Negative mass is weird (214 comments)

Out of interest, if there were pair creation events of involving particles of negative mass/gravity how would we detect them?

You're asking a lot, since we don't really know what the property of the particles are. A negative mass particle would curve in electric and magnetic fields (the usual way to determine what a particle is) just like a positive mass particle of the opposite charge. However, since negative mass particles also have negative kinetic energy, conservation of energy means that the remaining particles will have more energy coming out of the collision than they did going into it.

I'm not being critical, I'm curious - how would a particle accelerator, or a bubble chamber or whatever, look different with a negative mass particle?

Positive mass particles emit positive energy and slow down. Negative mass particles emit positive energy and speed up. If you see unknown particles exiting the scene at high velocity, and leaving behind more energy the faster they go, that would be a negative mass particle.

about two weeks ago
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Cosmologists Show Negative Mass Could Exist In Our Universe

Geoffrey.landis Re:Negative mass is weird (214 comments)

Okay, as long as I've got you on the line... :)

What's supposed to happen when negative and positive mass collide?

If I throw a tennis ball at a wall, it bounces off (and the wall recoils imperceptibly). If I throw a negative tennis ball at a wall -- or throw it away, causing it to move toward the wall, whatever -- what happens when it hits? It seems like it would try to "recoil" in the same direction it was traveling, maybe even giving the wall a "tug" instead of a "push" when it hit. \

Well, I already said negative matter is weird.

Robert Forward proposed that when positive matter and negative matter touch, they cancel each other out, and vanish:
  (+) + (-) --> 0 (vacuum)
The mass cancels, and you're left with nothing there.

Unfortunately, we know that this can't happen, because if it did, then the opposite reaction could occur:
  0 --> (+) + (-)
--vacuum spontaneously generating pairs of positive and negative mass. If this could happen, it would happen, everywhere, all the time. But it doesn't. So there are rules (presumably conservation laws) forbidding this from occurring.

But it can't move forward, because presumably negative and positive matter can't simply interpenetrate -- or can they?

Of course they can interpenetrate. The reason that you can't walk through a brick wall is because of Pauli exclusion: the electrons in your body can't occupy the same place (the same quantum state) as the electrons in the wall. But, whatever negative matter is, it's not electrons (nor any of the other particles that make up "solid" matter). So, yes, it would pass right through ordinary matter.

about two weeks ago
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Cosmologists Show Negative Mass Could Exist In Our Universe

Geoffrey.landis Negative mass is weird (214 comments)

What am I missing?

Nothing. Negative mass is weird.

What you're pointing out -- that a positive mass and a negative mass would chase each other-- was pointed out in 1957 in Bondi's paper about negative mass, "Negative Mass in General Relativity". Rev. Mod. Phys. 29 (3). Robert Forward, in 1990, then extended that analysis even further and pointed out that negative mass is even weirder than that.

A negative mass chasing a positive mass accelerates forever... but it doesn't violate conservation of energy, because the faster a negative mass moves, the more negative the kinetic energy, so the positive kinetic energy and the negative kinetic energy cancel out, leaving energy conserved.

There are weirder things than that, too.

If you think this is so weird that bulk negative mass can't exist... well, that's what Einstein thought (the "positive energy condition").

about two weeks ago
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Cosmologists Show Negative Mass Could Exist In Our Universe

Geoffrey.landis Dark energy is negative (214 comments)

Is this similar to, unrelated to, part of, dissimilar, orthogonal, integral, or in any way linked to Dark Matter?

It's unrelated to dark matter (which has positive mass- that's how we know it's there), but dark energy is gravitationally negative (it causes expansion to accelerate: it's gravitationally repulsive)

Because I (and probably most of us) don't understand that either.

You're in good company! If you did understand it, you could publish, and you should be getting a phone call from Stockholm soon.

about two weeks ago
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Cosmologists Show Negative Mass Could Exist In Our Universe

Geoffrey.landis Occam and White (214 comments)

What ever happened to Occam's Razor?

It competes with the totalitarian principle, "everything that is not forbidden is compulsory."

about two weeks ago
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Cosmologists Show Negative Mass Could Exist In Our Universe

Geoffrey.landis Negative mass- not antimatter, but odd (214 comments)

Negative mass is very diferent from antimatter. Antimatter is opposite to normal matter in charge and quantum numbers (such as baryon number, etc.), but still has positive mass.

Negative mass reacts oppositely to both gravity and intertia. Oddly, that means that negative mass still falls down in a gravitational field: The gravitational force is opposite, but negative mass responds negatively to force (a=F/m, where both F and m are negative). So negative mass particles repel each other gravitationally, but are attracted to positive mass objects.

This has peculiar consequences. One consequence is that, for objects of negative mass, gravity and electrostatic charge switch. For normal mass objects, gravity is attractive, but like electrical charges repel. For negative matter, gravity is repulsive, but like electrical charges attract.

I wrote about this once, in the AIAA Journal of Propulsion and Power-- not a journal that physicists usually read, I'm afraid. If you have access to AIAA online, it's here: http://arc.aiaa.org/doi/pdf/10...

about two weeks ago
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SpaceX Falcon 9 Rocket Blasts Off From Florida

Geoffrey.landis Re:"An anonymous reader" (112 comments)

It seems to me that NASA should simply contract those basic research payloads on top of SpaceX rockets, if SpaceX can get them into orbit for fewer dollars than NASA's own internal teams can. Why waste resources?

That's the way NASA currently does business: launch services are purchased.

SpaceX developed Falcon-9 on a NASA contract, specifically in order to be a vehicle that can be purchased for launch services. ("Commercial Orbital Transportation Services" was the name of the contract.)

about two weeks ago
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Arecibo Radio Telescope Confirms Extra-galactic Fast Radio Pulses

Geoffrey.landis Re:Could it be ... (95 comments)

While fast radio bursts last just a few thousandths of a second and have rarely been detected, the new result confirms previous estimates that these strange cosmic bursts occur roughly 10,000 times a day over the whole sky.

That's a lot of aliens.

Well, since there are 100 to 200 billion galaxies in the observable universe, not so many. One burst per galaxy every 50,000 years or so.

 

Or maybe we are inside of a slow thinking alien's head.

about three weeks ago
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Arecibo Radio Telescope Confirms Extra-galactic Fast Radio Pulses

Geoffrey.landis Beacon (95 comments)

It's worth pointing out that a good way to send a signal would be to have a bright but transient beacon, which doesn't itself transmit information (other than "here I am"), but serves to tell others where to point their high-gain radiotelescopes.

This could be what such a beacon would look like.

Not to mention the power output it would need to send a detectible signal from another galaxy.

From the summary: "bright flashes of radio waves that last only a few thousandths of a second.

A high power for a few milliseconds may not take an enormous amount of energy.

about three weeks ago
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My most recent energy-saving bulbs last ...

Geoffrey.landis Re:Dimmable LEDs (278 comments)

Without dimmers, I've been hard pressed to see the difference between brands.

The differences are not easily visible from the outside. Some brands have gone through some pretty rigorous lifetime testing-- humidity, voltage variation, temperature-- while others are just "as long as it works long enough for the consumer to throw away the receipt" made, but you can't really tell by just looking at them.

Also, Lumens per watt can vary quite significantly from one to another.

about three weeks ago

Submissions

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Adrift

Geoffrey.landis Geoffrey.landis writes  |  about 2 months ago

Geoffrey.landis (926948) writes "After the space shuttle retired in 2011, Russia has hiked the price of a trip to the International Space Station, to $71 million per seat. Less well recognized is the disparity in station crews. Before the shuttle stopped flying, an equal number of American and Russian crew members lived on board. But afterwards the bear began squeezing. For every two NASA astronauts that have flown to the station, three Russians have gone.

Eric Burger asks, how did it come to this?"

Link to Original Source
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A Playlist for Comet Ison

Geoffrey.landis Geoffrey.landis writes  |  about 7 months ago

Geoffrey.landis (926948) writes "As comet ISON made its perilous perihelion pass, I decided that ISON needed a theme song, but as the nature of its journey became evident, shattering in the sunlight, I realized that ISON needs an entire playlist. So, for your entertainment, here's my comet ISON playlist. Comments? "
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Why the Arabic World Turned Away From Science

Geoffrey.landis Geoffrey.landis writes  |  about a year and a half ago

Geoffrey.landis writes "The historical period that we call the dark ages, from perhaps 600 to 1200 AD, was the golden age of Islamic science, when great advances in science and technology were taking place in the middle east. But somehow, as the west experienced its renaissance, the blossoming of the age of science, and the founding of the modern technological world, the Arabic world instead turned away from science. Muslim countries have nine scientists, engineers, and technicians per thousand people, compared with a world average of forty-one, and of roughly 1.6 billion Muslims in the world, only two scientists from Muslim countries have won Nobel Prizes in science. Why? In an article "Why the Arabic World Turned Away from Science" in The New Atlantis, Hillel Ofek examines both the reasons why Islamic science flourished, and why it failed. Are we turning the same way, with a rising tide of religious fundamentalism and dogma shouting down the culture of inquiry and free thinking needed for scientific advances? Perhaps we should be looking at the decline of Islamic science as a cautionary tale."
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The Election Map, as a Cartogram

Geoffrey.landis Geoffrey.landis writes  |  about a year and a half ago

Geoffrey.landis writes "By now we've all seen those maps of the US colored red and blue for which presidential candidate won a particular state. Those maps are a bit misleading, though, since vast areas of America have very low population. Mark Newman, of the University of Michigan, shows variant ways of mapping the election, with the maps distorted to un-distort the data."
Link to Original Source
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Harrassment of Climate Scientists is Unique to America

Geoffrey.landis Geoffrey.landis writes  |  about 2 years ago

Geoffrey.landis writes "In the United States, climate scientists are subject to significant amounts of harassment , including "torrents of freedom of information requests, hate mail and even death threats from skeptics"-- but this phenomenon seems to be happening only in America. In other countries, climate scientists are mostly free to work without fear.

"The harassment has an intimidating effect—especially on young scientists," according to Stefan Rahmstorf, head of Earth system analysis at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research in Germany. Alan Leshner of the American Association for the Advancement of Science said he sees the attacks on scientists in the United States as "very disconcerting." Last year, AAAS released a statement condemning the harassment. "The incidents reflect two unfortunate things," Leshner said in an interview, "we live in a society where ideologies trump our willingness to hear what science says, and in a country where free speech is so widely valued, people are being attacked."

The only other country in which climate scientists routinely face harassment and death threats is Australia, which is the largest exporter of coal in the world. Coal industry groups in Australia have sought to cast doubt on climate science and have lobbied against carbon emission limits."

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Majority of Americans Think Obama Is Better Suited to Handle an Alien Invasion

Geoffrey.landis Geoffrey.landis writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Geoffrey.landis writes "At last, a public opinion poll that gets the opinions of ordinary Americans on the issues that matter! Apparently, two thirds of Americans polled think that Barrack Obama is better suited to defend against an alien invasion than Mitt Romney, according to a survey from National Geographic Channel, done to tout their upcoming TV series "chasing UFOs".
In follow-up questioning, Americans would rather call on the Hulk (21%) than either Batman (12%) or Spiderman (8%) to step to save the day.
No word on which candidate is most fit to defend America against shambling hordes of undead seeking to destroy civilization in the zombie apocalypse (perhaps that will be brought out in the debates)."

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Photographing police: Deletion is not forever

Geoffrey.landis Geoffrey.landis writes  |  about 2 years ago

Geoffrey.landis writes "The courts have now ruled that the public has the right to videotape the police in the performance of their duties. Of course, that doesn't stop the police from harrassing people who do so, even journalists, not to mention confiscating their cameras.
As it turns out, though, they're not always very knowledgable about how deletion works.
I would say that erasing, or attempting to erase, a video of police arresting somebody illegally (How can a journalist be charged with "resisting arrest" when he was not being arrested for anything other than resisting arrest?) is a clear case of destruction of evidence by the officers. Destroying evidence is obstruction of justice. That's illegal. Why haven't these police officers been arrested?"

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Is the creative class engine sputtering?

Geoffrey.landis Geoffrey.landis writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Geoffrey.landis writes "The "creative class" was supposed to be the new engine of the United States economy, but--according to Scott Timberg, writing in Salon-- that engine is sputtering. While a very few technologists have become very wealthy, for most creative workers, the rise of amateurs and enthusiasts means that few are actually making a living. The new economy is good for the elite who own the servers, but, for most, "the dream of a laptop-powered 'knowledge class' is dead," he says."
Link to Original Source
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Neal Stephenson on "Innovation Starvation"

Geoffrey.landis Geoffrey.landis writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Geoffrey.landis writes "In an essay discussing the space program, author Neal Stephenson suggests that the decline of the space program "might be symptomatic of a general failure of our society to get big things done." He suggests that we may be suffering from innovation starvation:
"Innovation can’t happen without accepting the risk that it might fail. The vast and radical innovations of the mid-20th century took place in a world that, in retrospect, looks insanely dangerous and unstable.""

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Conservative means accepting science

Geoffrey.landis Geoffrey.landis writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Geoffrey.landis writes "Recently, it has seemed that it is a requirements of being a conservative to deny the accuracy of climate science and cast aspersions on the motives of scientists, regardless of any evidence offered. So it's a little refreshing to see a Republican weighing in on the side of science, saying that conservatives should deal in facts, and "base policies on science, not sentiment.""
Link to Original Source
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Loan to Solyndra pushed by both sides

Geoffrey.landis Geoffrey.landis writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Geoffrey.landis writes "I haven't been paying much attention to the bankruptcy of solar array manufacturer Solyndra-- they were pushing a technology I don't find terribly exciting. Still, it's interesting how the recent spin has called it as a failure of the Obama energy initiatives. In fact, as a recent timeline shows, the loan guarantees for renewable energy came from the Energy Policy Act of 2005-- and the particular loan to Solyndra was fast-tracked by the Bush administration, in an effort to show it has done something to support renewable energy.

alternate URL: http://thinkprogress.org/romm/2011/09/13/317594/timeline-bush-administration-solyndra-loan-guarantee/"

Link to Original Source
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What to Know if you're Filming the TSA

Geoffrey.landis Geoffrey.landis writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Geoffrey.landis (926948) writes "CNN posts a brief article "Shooting video at a TSA checkpoint? Here's what you should know, explaining your rights in shooting video of TSA screenings. First, she notes (from an article on the TSA blog last year) that the TSA doesn't forbid photography, as long as you don't film those monitors showing nude passengers:

"We don't prohibit public, passengers or press from photographing, videotaping, or filming at screening locations. You can take pictures at our checkpoints as long as you're not interfering with the screening process or slowing things down. We also ask that you do not film or take pictures of our monitors."

--the article does go on to note that state laws or local ordinances may prohibit filming.

And then she posts advice from Ms. Smith's "Privacy and Security Fanatic," which is that

"if you do videotape TSA checkpoints, then you should have the TSA public affairs (TSA's Office of Strategic Communications) number plugged into your phone: (571) 227-2829. Another important phone number to have with you is the TSA's Office of Civil Rights at (571) 227-1917."

Ms. Smith goes on to tell some stories of people who have been challenged at airport screening stations for shooting video. Important note, it's probably wise not to take off your pants except your underwear while doing this.

So, go ahead, and video, but know your rights and "stay calm and polite at all times." You could be the next You-tube sensation."

Link to Original Source

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Lawsuit shows Dell hid extent of computer flaws

Geoffrey.landis Geoffrey.landis writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Geoffrey.landis (926948) writes "According to an article in the New York Times, documents revealed in a lawsuit against Dell show that the computer maker hid the extent of possible damages due to a faulty capacitor in the ocmputers it shipped from 2003 to 2005. Dell employees were told "Don’t bring this to customer’s attention proactively” and “emphasize uncertainty.”
"As it tried to deal with the mounting issues, Dell began ranking customers by importance, putting first those who might move their accounts to another PC maker, followed by those who might curtail sales and giving the lowest priority to those who were bothered but still willing to stick with Dell."

--in other words, the most loyal customers got shafted first."

Link to Original Source
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US says Genes should not be patentable

Geoffrey.landis Geoffrey.landis writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Geoffrey.landis (926948) writes "A friend-of-the-court brief filed by the U.S. Department of Justice says that genes should not be patentable.

“We acknowledge that this conclusion is contrary to the longstanding practice of the Patent and Trademark Office, as well as the practice of the National Institutes of Health and other government agencies that have in the past sought and obtained patents for isolated genomic DNA,” they wrote.

The argument that genes in themselves (as opposed to, say, tests made from genetic information, or drugs that act on proteins made by genes) should be patentable is that "genes isolated from the body are chemicals that are different from those found in the body" and therefore are eligible for patents. This argument is, of course, completely silly, and apparently the U.S. government may now actually realize that."

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A New Species of Patent Troll

Geoffrey.landis Geoffrey.landis writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Geoffrey.landis (926948) writes "From the Wall Street Journal, there's an article warning that there's a new species of patent troll out there. These sue companies that sell products with an expired patent number on them. That's right, it's against the law to sell a product that's marked with an expired patent number. The potential fine? $500. Per violation-- and some of the companies have patent numbers on old plastic molds that have made literally billions of copies. Using whistle-blower laws, "anyone can file a claim on behalf of the government, and plaintiffs must split any fine award evenly with it."
You've been warned."

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E=mc^2 is a liberal conspiracy

Geoffrey.landis Geoffrey.landis writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Geoffrey.landis (926948) writes ""Conservapedia," was founded to be a conservative-tilted alternative to Wikipedia.
From the article: "To many conservatives, almost everything is a secret liberal plot: from fluoride in the water to medicare reimbursements for end-of-life planning with your doctor to efforts to teach evolution in schools. But Conservapedia founder and Eagle Forum University instructor Andy Schlafly — Phyllis Schlafly's son — has found one more liberal plot: the theory of relativity."
Yes, that's right: relativity is apparently a liberal plot. No doubt, the atomic bomb is a hoax, just like the moon landing and global warming."

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Man buys the police website to complain

Geoffrey.landis Geoffrey.landis writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Geoffrey.landis (926948) writes "When a Tennessee police department let its website expire, the site was purchased by a man who uses it to complain about the traffic cameras that gave him a $90 speeding ticket.
The bluffcitypd.com site now shows a cartoon police badge clutching a handful of money and smiling.
Also reported in other places, such as the Chicago Tribune and USA Today"

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George W. Bush embraces alternative energy

Geoffrey.landis Geoffrey.landis writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Geoffrey.landis (926948) writes "It's hard to believe, but former Texas oilman George W. Bush just came out in favor of alternate energy sources. At the American Wind Energy Association conference in Dallas, Bush said: "It's in our economic interests that we diversify away from oil. It's in our environmental interest. And, finally, it's in our national security interest." More details are on the green blog:

He had said in a State of the Union address that America was addicted to oil. "If you’re a guy from Texas and you say America is addicted to oil, it's a surprising moment," Mr. Bush said... These days, the former president said, "The overall trend in my judgment is that new technologies will find new ways to power our lives. I fully believe that hybrid plug-ins will be a transition to electric cars," he said, and that new ways to generate electricity will be needed.

In a time when climate-warming-deniers are screaming that shifting to alternate energy sources is going to destroy America's economy, it's amazing to see the former number-one Republican actually say that moving to alternate energy is in our economic interest, and new ways to generate electricity are needed Now if we could only get the ones who are still in power to understand this..."
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