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Jackie Chan Discs Help Boost Solar Panel Efficiency

Geoffrey.landis Quantum efficiency is not energy conversion (178 comments)

So, then, where can I purchase one of your 90% or better efficiency solar cells?

Quantum efficiency is not the same as energy conversion efficiency. A solar cell with 90% quantum efficiency isn't too hard to find. It's not going to have 90% energy conversion efficiency.

https://www.google.com/search?...

13 hours ago
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Jackie Chan Discs Help Boost Solar Panel Efficiency

Geoffrey.landis TERRIBLE efficiency (178 comments)

The latter - but that's still a nice jump in the solar cell world.

No, that's a terrible quantum efficiency in the solar cell world.

Quantum efficiency is electrons out per photon in. In the wavelength band over which a solar cell absorbs, the quantum efficiency of a good solar cell ought to be very close to 100%. Even a mediocre solar cell should be 90% or better.

40%??? That's nothing to brag about.

yesterday
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US Gov't Seeks To Keep Megaupload Assets Because Kim Dotcom Is a Fugitive

Geoffrey.landis A step too far [Re:Wait what?] (171 comments)

It's a tricky case. Basically, the doctrine says that a fugitive can't say "I'm not subject to this court" (by fleeing justice) and simultaneously use the court to his advantage, in different aspects of the same matter.
I am not a lawyer (IANL), but as far as I can see, this case is very similar to Degen v. United States (1996). In that case, the Supreme Court explicitly said that the government was not justified in using the doctrine of fugitive disentitlement to dismiss a challenge of forfeiture.
Reference and discussion: http://scholarlycommons.law.no...

The summary of that case (from http://www.oyez.org/cases/1990... ):
"Principles of deference to the other branches of government require a court to invoke its inherent power only as a reasonable response to the problems and needs that provoke it. No sufficient reason justifies disentitlement here. Since the court's jurisdiction over the property is secure despite Degen's absence, there is no risk of delay or frustration in determining the merits of the government's forfeiture claims or in enforcing the resulting judgment. Also, the court has alternatives, other than disentitlement, to keep Degen from using liberal civil discovery rules to gain an improper advantage in the criminal prosecution, where discovery is more limited. Finally, disentitlement is an excessive response to the court's interests in redressing the indignity visited upon it by Degen's absence from the criminal proceeding, and in deterring flight from criminal prosecution in general; it is a response that erodes rather than enhances the dignity of the court."

about a week ago
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Lessons Learned From Google's Green Energy Bust

Geoffrey.landis Buzz words instead of thinking (219 comments)

dunkelfalke (91624) writes:

I have seen - predominantly on Slashdot, obviously, but also elsewhere, a sort of naive technocrats (who are often also libertarians) believing that as soon as some technology is needed, the invisible hand of the market magically creates this technology so one only has to sit and wait for this magic solution to appear out of thin air. The more down-to-earth kind of these people even tried to explain this magic by telling that this process happens by throwing enough money at a problem.

--and Anonymous Coward responds

I have seen - predominantly on Slashdot, obviously, but also elsewhere, a sort of naive technocrats (who are often also liberals or progressives or socialists) believing that as soon as some technology is needed, the state magically creates this technology so one only has to sit and wait for this magic solution to appear out of thin air. The more down-to-earth kind of these people even tried to explain this magic by telling that this process happens by throwing enough money at a problem.

OK, somebody should moderate both of these as "troll".

There is some insight here, but the insight is completely washed out by the gratuitous insults and use of deliberately slanted vocabulary.

In fact, the market is good at solving some types of problems. And government is good at solving some of the types of problems that the market isn't good at. But people of all political views always call approaches that don't fit their ideology "throwing money at the problem." If it's a solution that fits your politics, it's "investing in technology," and if it's a solution that doesn't fit your politics, it suddenly "throwing money at the problem." Same thing, different choice of spin.

But randomly insulting political positions for the joy of insults, and substituting buzz words for thinking, really does not substitute for actual analysis.

about a week ago
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Lessons Learned From Google's Green Energy Bust

Geoffrey.landis Peak [Re:Yet] (219 comments)

Solar cell costs are plunging, while their efficiencies rise. I predict a collision, a market and a profit.

You might see one, if you could just plug solar cells into your house and magically get power all day. Most of our power usage in our house is at night, when... oops... there's no solar power.

No, actually, in America the highest electrical usage is in the afternoon. It's driven by air conditioning loads in summer, along with the fact that business and industry tends to use the most power only during working hours. There's a slight bump at about 7, but it's not as big as the afternoon peak.

Quick calculations suggest that you can replace about 10% of US electrical usage with solar with no disruption at all, and something like 20 to 30 percent with only minimal disruption.

That's not enough to solve the energy problem. But, with the electricity market in the US at something like half a trillion dollars a year, that's a substantial market (and substantial profit)

about a week ago
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Researchers Discover Ancient Massive Landslide

Geoffrey.landis Re:UOM conversion help, please (44 comments)

For European readers: it is about 5% of the area of Bavaria

How many Liechtenstein is that?

about a week ago
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City of Toronto Files Court Injunction Against Uber

Geoffrey.landis Uber privacy (169 comments)

On the subject of Uber, anybody else look at Uber's new privacy policy, and think it's a bit skanky?

http://www.buzzfeed.com/johana...

--What a carefully crafted weasel-worded policy. It says that Uber retains the right to violate your privacy for "legitimate business purposes"-- but doesn't define any limits on what they're going to call "legitimate." They list some "examples", which sounds soothing-- but these are just SOME of the reasons they might violate your privacy-- not ALL the reasons. Frankly, this policy states that they can violate your privacy any time they want, just as long as they say there is a business purpose to doing so.

Oh, and they don't have to tell you, either.

about a week ago
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City of Toronto Files Court Injunction Against Uber

Geoffrey.landis Fourth Largest city, Eighth Biggest Metro area (169 comments)

Actually, according to our good friend wikipedia, Toronto is still 8th by metre area population in NA.

It makes a difference whether you are asking about the population of the city, or the population of the metro area, the city plus surrounding areas that are not in the same political unit.

Cities: Toronto is fourth largest: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...
Metropolitan Areas: Toronto is eighth largest: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...
Urban Agglomertions: Toronto is number five: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...

So I rate the original claim,

Toronto is Canada's largest city, the fourth largest in North America

, as True.

about a week ago
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CERN May Not Have Discovered Higgs Boson After All

Geoffrey.landis Higgs [Re:Independent confirmation] (137 comments)

Physical theories are confirmed by evidence, and well confirmed by large amounts of of evidence... but confirmation is not exactly the same as proof

Who's replicated the Higgs?

The Higgs discovery was done by two groups, working independently and doing different experiments, although using the same accelerator, so that's a good start.

I would not call the Higgs discovery well confirmed, though; not yet. You definitely want to keep on doing experiments to nail this one down more confidently.

about two weeks ago
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CERN May Not Have Discovered Higgs Boson After All

Geoffrey.landis Independent confirmation (137 comments)

Large amounts of evidence only confirms a theory if the evidence is independent.

Yep. That's why you want independent confirmation. Replication is what makes science.

Never rely on scientific results until they're independently confirmed.

about three weeks ago
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CERN May Not Have Discovered Higgs Boson After All

Geoffrey.landis Confirmation, not proof [Re:Problem with induc...] (137 comments)

I doubt many scientists believe that you can prove any scientific theory true.

In general, this is correct: you can prove a scientific theory false, but never prove it true. (You can prove mathematical theories true. But mathematical theories require assumptions, called postulates. To prove that a mathematical theory is true in the real world, you would need to find a way to prove the postulates true.)

Physical theories are confirmed by evidence, and well confirmed by large amounts of of evidence... but confirmation is not exactly the same as proof

about three weeks ago
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CERN May Not Have Discovered Higgs Boson After All

Geoffrey.landis Predicting, not discovering (137 comments)

The summary was wrong: Physicists Peter Higgs and Francois Englert did not win the Nobel Prize for discovering the Higgs Boson. They (along with some others) predicted it, but didn't discover it. (More accurately, they won the Nobel for elucidating the Higgs mechanism of symmetry breaking as a means for massless particles to acquire mass).
This was a deduction (deducing that a particular field would lead to symmetry breaking with particular properties, from the mathematics of field theories), not an induction (fitting a model to theories).

about three weeks ago
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SpaceShipTwo's new rocket fuel wasn't at fault--but wasn't the best one either

Geoffrey.landis Mostly about using paraffin wax as a hybrid fuel (2 comments)

Well, this is mostly an article about using paraffin wax instead of polymers as the fuel for hybrid rocket engines; it's only in passing talking about SpaceShipTwo. It's a little misleading to highlight "SpaceShipTwo" in the headline.
But it's an interesting article. I do like the wax propellant; it's a useful approach toward increasing the thrust of hybrids.
As I've been fond of saying, the good news is that hybrid rocket engines combine the best features of solid engines and liquid engines. The bad news is that hybrid rocket engines also combine the worst features of solid engines and liquid engines.

about three weeks ago
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Statisticians Study Who Was Helped Most By Obamacare

Geoffrey.landis Re:misleading (739 comments)

What impacts them are the policies the party they vote for enact. So yes they vote Republican and Republican policies hurt them.

The point is that, in terms of voting for governorship of their state, the poorest ten states don't vote Republican. They vote equally Republican and Democratic.

about a month ago
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Statisticians Study Who Was Helped Most By Obamacare

Geoffrey.landis Re:Objection to objective (739 comments)

No, I just said consider the source when reading the numbers. If you blindly accept them, fine with me.

That would be wise... except you apparently didn't consider the source; you just were looking for an excuse to say "I don't believe these numbers". Did you even read the source material? The source was an organization with the explicit objective "to find the uninsured around the country and persuade them to sign up for health insurance." Quoting from the article: "the groups have little incentive for bias because skewed numbers would complicate efforts to find the uninsured and target outreach resources."

about a month ago
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Statisticians Study Who Was Helped Most By Obamacare

Geoffrey.landis Objection to objective (739 comments)

1. I see plenty of anecdotal stories that support many views.

Well, you were the one making up anecdotal stories-- I was just listing what I'd heard from people I know. Except you didn't even have actual anecdotes from real people-- you were just making up a hypothetical, "maybe people did not want or feel they needed health care." Yeah, right. Maybe some people do prefer to rely on emergency rooms, paid for by taxpayers, if they get catastrophically sick. I do not consider this an optimal solution.

People hear what they listen for. Numbers from objective studies are what I'd pay attention to.

To the contrary. When presented with numbers, your response was "Its not that hard to play with numbers to make any point you want. "

Translation: any time you see numbers that don't support what you already have decided, you say they're not 'objective'. Great strategy: ignore anything you don't like.

about a month ago
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Statisticians Study Who Was Helped Most By Obamacare

Geoffrey.landis Re:Redistribution (739 comments)

...The fact that many of the (very optimistically estimated) number of those who were added to O-Care rolls did not want or feel they needed it should be considered as well.

I personally know several people who were able to get insurance under Obamacare but didn't have it before. Not one says that they "did not want or feel they needed" insurance. What they say is, "Thank God, this is saving my life."

However, even if what you said was true: what you are implying is that there is a body of people who previously were saying "I don't want or need insurance, because if I get sick I'll go to a hospital that is legally is not allowed to turn me away, and the taxpayers will pay for it," -and they are now paying for their own health care. That's a win for the taxpayers.

In other cases, such as ones I am very familiar with, previously covered spouses were forced to move to their own plan if their work provider had coverage available. This means that although a new health care subscriber can now be counted, that person was already covered

That's not the way the number of uninsured is counted. That would count as a wash: neither an addition nor a reduction to the number of uninsured.

... More often than not, it is the large urban populations that shift state's support bias to liberal, and it is those same urban areas that hold the most desperate and dependent populations of the truly underprivileged.

Sorry, the belief that poverty is an urban phenomenon is another myth. It's a myth that's pervasive among liberals and conservatives, but simply not true. There are actually more poor and underprivileged people in rural America. You're right about urban areas being liberal and rural conservative, but wrong about being able to attribute that to "dependent populations of truly underprivileged": the greatest use of food stamps, as a percentage of population, in poor rural areas, not urban areas.

.... Its not that hard to play with numbers to make any point you want.

But you don't have to do that, because it's even easier to simply say "Those numbers don't support my political bias, so they are wrong."

about a month ago
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Statisticians Study Who Was Helped Most By Obamacare

Geoffrey.landis misleading (739 comments)

The final sentence of the summary is misleading.

Many of the poorest and most rural states in the country tend to favor Republican politicians.

The link is to a 2011 article, which states the following:

Most of the 10 poorest states in the country are Republican. Mississippi is the poorest... followed by Arkansas, Tennessee, West Virginia, Louisiana, Montana, South Carolina, Kentucky, Alabama and North Carolina.

The economics of a state is more impacted by what party holds the governorship and statehouse, not by what party they voted for for president. Looking at the governorship of each of those states
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wi...
you see that the parties of the governors of the states listed are, respectively, Republican, Democratic, Republican, Democratic, Republican, Democratic, Republican, Democratic, Republican, Republican.

about a month ago
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Fighting the Culture of 'Worse Is Better'

Geoffrey.landis Worse is worse (240 comments)

I would assert precisely the opposite. "trade-offs to preserve compatibility and interoperability" do not cripple the functionality to users-- failures to engineer compatibility and interoperability is what cripples functionality.

The number of times that there's been a new feature and I've said "oh, excellent, it's true that my old files no longer work, but this is so wonderful I don't care" has been very close to zero. The number of times there's been a new feature and I've said "those assholes, I have twenty thousand files that don't work any more, what in the world were those idiots thinking?" is decidedly not zero.

about a month and a half ago
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The Cult of Elon Musk Shines With Steve Jobs' Aura

Geoffrey.landis Re:Steve Jobs' products changed the world? (181 comments)

I'm not sure to what extent Tesla innovated to create the cars they have, but certainly they made the first EV that people actually wanted to have for reasons other than it being an EV or hybrid.

The Tesla Roadster made electric cars cool, in that it was a car for the ultra-top end market, people who otherwise would be buying a Lotus or Ferrari. So, it was an existence proof that you could make an EV that contended with top-end sports cars.

It was also one of the first mass market EVs that doesn't look like utter crap (the Honda Civic hybrid being the other one).

Actually, Leaf is the top selling EV on the market right now. If you count electric cars with gasoline backup, Volt would be on the list.

Tesla doesn't make a mass-market EV yet; their Model S right now is rather a luxury car rather than something for the average buyer. While I'd love to have one... I don't think Tesla comes anywhere close to being "the first" in the way of mass market EVs. There are a lot of electric cars out there, both mass-market and otherwise.

about a month and a half ago

Submissions

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Adrift

Geoffrey.landis Geoffrey.landis writes  |  about 6 months ago

Geoffrey.landis (926948) writes "After the space shuttle retired in 2011, Russia has hiked the price of a trip to the International Space Station, to $71 million per seat. Less well recognized is the disparity in station crews. Before the shuttle stopped flying, an equal number of American and Russian crew members lived on board. But afterwards the bear began squeezing. For every two NASA astronauts that have flown to the station, three Russians have gone.

Eric Burger asks, how did it come to this?"

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A Playlist for Comet Ison

Geoffrey.landis Geoffrey.landis writes  |  about a year ago

Geoffrey.landis (926948) writes "As comet ISON made its perilous perihelion pass, I decided that ISON needed a theme song, but as the nature of its journey became evident, shattering in the sunlight, I realized that ISON needs an entire playlist. So, for your entertainment, here's my comet ISON playlist. Comments? "
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Why the Arabic World Turned Away From Science

Geoffrey.landis Geoffrey.landis writes  |  about 2 years ago

Geoffrey.landis writes "The historical period that we call the dark ages, from perhaps 600 to 1200 AD, was the golden age of Islamic science, when great advances in science and technology were taking place in the middle east. But somehow, as the west experienced its renaissance, the blossoming of the age of science, and the founding of the modern technological world, the Arabic world instead turned away from science. Muslim countries have nine scientists, engineers, and technicians per thousand people, compared with a world average of forty-one, and of roughly 1.6 billion Muslims in the world, only two scientists from Muslim countries have won Nobel Prizes in science. Why? In an article "Why the Arabic World Turned Away from Science" in The New Atlantis, Hillel Ofek examines both the reasons why Islamic science flourished, and why it failed. Are we turning the same way, with a rising tide of religious fundamentalism and dogma shouting down the culture of inquiry and free thinking needed for scientific advances? Perhaps we should be looking at the decline of Islamic science as a cautionary tale."
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The Election Map, as a Cartogram

Geoffrey.landis Geoffrey.landis writes  |  about 2 years ago

Geoffrey.landis writes "By now we've all seen those maps of the US colored red and blue for which presidential candidate won a particular state. Those maps are a bit misleading, though, since vast areas of America have very low population. Mark Newman, of the University of Michigan, shows variant ways of mapping the election, with the maps distorted to un-distort the data."
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Harrassment of Climate Scientists is Unique to America

Geoffrey.landis Geoffrey.landis writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Geoffrey.landis writes "In the United States, climate scientists are subject to significant amounts of harassment , including "torrents of freedom of information requests, hate mail and even death threats from skeptics"-- but this phenomenon seems to be happening only in America. In other countries, climate scientists are mostly free to work without fear.

"The harassment has an intimidating effect—especially on young scientists," according to Stefan Rahmstorf, head of Earth system analysis at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research in Germany. Alan Leshner of the American Association for the Advancement of Science said he sees the attacks on scientists in the United States as "very disconcerting." Last year, AAAS released a statement condemning the harassment. "The incidents reflect two unfortunate things," Leshner said in an interview, "we live in a society where ideologies trump our willingness to hear what science says, and in a country where free speech is so widely valued, people are being attacked."

The only other country in which climate scientists routinely face harassment and death threats is Australia, which is the largest exporter of coal in the world. Coal industry groups in Australia have sought to cast doubt on climate science and have lobbied against carbon emission limits."

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Majority of Americans Think Obama Is Better Suited to Handle an Alien Invasion

Geoffrey.landis Geoffrey.landis writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Geoffrey.landis writes "At last, a public opinion poll that gets the opinions of ordinary Americans on the issues that matter! Apparently, two thirds of Americans polled think that Barrack Obama is better suited to defend against an alien invasion than Mitt Romney, according to a survey from National Geographic Channel, done to tout their upcoming TV series "chasing UFOs".
In follow-up questioning, Americans would rather call on the Hulk (21%) than either Batman (12%) or Spiderman (8%) to step to save the day.
No word on which candidate is most fit to defend America against shambling hordes of undead seeking to destroy civilization in the zombie apocalypse (perhaps that will be brought out in the debates)."

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Photographing police: Deletion is not forever

Geoffrey.landis Geoffrey.landis writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Geoffrey.landis writes "The courts have now ruled that the public has the right to videotape the police in the performance of their duties. Of course, that doesn't stop the police from harrassing people who do so, even journalists, not to mention confiscating their cameras.
As it turns out, though, they're not always very knowledgable about how deletion works.
I would say that erasing, or attempting to erase, a video of police arresting somebody illegally (How can a journalist be charged with "resisting arrest" when he was not being arrested for anything other than resisting arrest?) is a clear case of destruction of evidence by the officers. Destroying evidence is obstruction of justice. That's illegal. Why haven't these police officers been arrested?"

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Is the creative class engine sputtering?

Geoffrey.landis Geoffrey.landis writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Geoffrey.landis writes "The "creative class" was supposed to be the new engine of the United States economy, but--according to Scott Timberg, writing in Salon-- that engine is sputtering. While a very few technologists have become very wealthy, for most creative workers, the rise of amateurs and enthusiasts means that few are actually making a living. The new economy is good for the elite who own the servers, but, for most, "the dream of a laptop-powered 'knowledge class' is dead," he says."
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Neal Stephenson on "Innovation Starvation"

Geoffrey.landis Geoffrey.landis writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Geoffrey.landis writes "In an essay discussing the space program, author Neal Stephenson suggests that the decline of the space program "might be symptomatic of a general failure of our society to get big things done." He suggests that we may be suffering from innovation starvation:
"Innovation can’t happen without accepting the risk that it might fail. The vast and radical innovations of the mid-20th century took place in a world that, in retrospect, looks insanely dangerous and unstable.""

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Conservative means accepting science

Geoffrey.landis Geoffrey.landis writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Geoffrey.landis writes "Recently, it has seemed that it is a requirements of being a conservative to deny the accuracy of climate science and cast aspersions on the motives of scientists, regardless of any evidence offered. So it's a little refreshing to see a Republican weighing in on the side of science, saying that conservatives should deal in facts, and "base policies on science, not sentiment.""
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Loan to Solyndra pushed by both sides

Geoffrey.landis Geoffrey.landis writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Geoffrey.landis writes "I haven't been paying much attention to the bankruptcy of solar array manufacturer Solyndra-- they were pushing a technology I don't find terribly exciting. Still, it's interesting how the recent spin has called it as a failure of the Obama energy initiatives. In fact, as a recent timeline shows, the loan guarantees for renewable energy came from the Energy Policy Act of 2005-- and the particular loan to Solyndra was fast-tracked by the Bush administration, in an effort to show it has done something to support renewable energy.

alternate URL: http://thinkprogress.org/romm/2011/09/13/317594/timeline-bush-administration-solyndra-loan-guarantee/"

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What to Know if you're Filming the TSA

Geoffrey.landis Geoffrey.landis writes  |  about 4 years ago

Geoffrey.landis (926948) writes "CNN posts a brief article "Shooting video at a TSA checkpoint? Here's what you should know, explaining your rights in shooting video of TSA screenings. First, she notes (from an article on the TSA blog last year) that the TSA doesn't forbid photography, as long as you don't film those monitors showing nude passengers:

"We don't prohibit public, passengers or press from photographing, videotaping, or filming at screening locations. You can take pictures at our checkpoints as long as you're not interfering with the screening process or slowing things down. We also ask that you do not film or take pictures of our monitors."

--the article does go on to note that state laws or local ordinances may prohibit filming.

And then she posts advice from Ms. Smith's "Privacy and Security Fanatic," which is that

"if you do videotape TSA checkpoints, then you should have the TSA public affairs (TSA's Office of Strategic Communications) number plugged into your phone: (571) 227-2829. Another important phone number to have with you is the TSA's Office of Civil Rights at (571) 227-1917."

Ms. Smith goes on to tell some stories of people who have been challenged at airport screening stations for shooting video. Important note, it's probably wise not to take off your pants except your underwear while doing this.

So, go ahead, and video, but know your rights and "stay calm and polite at all times." You could be the next You-tube sensation."

Link to Original Source

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Lawsuit shows Dell hid extent of computer flaws

Geoffrey.landis Geoffrey.landis writes  |  about 4 years ago

Geoffrey.landis (926948) writes "According to an article in the New York Times, documents revealed in a lawsuit against Dell show that the computer maker hid the extent of possible damages due to a faulty capacitor in the ocmputers it shipped from 2003 to 2005. Dell employees were told "Don’t bring this to customer’s attention proactively” and “emphasize uncertainty.”
"As it tried to deal with the mounting issues, Dell began ranking customers by importance, putting first those who might move their accounts to another PC maker, followed by those who might curtail sales and giving the lowest priority to those who were bothered but still willing to stick with Dell."

--in other words, the most loyal customers got shafted first."

Link to Original Source
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US says Genes should not be patentable

Geoffrey.landis Geoffrey.landis writes  |  about 4 years ago

Geoffrey.landis (926948) writes "A friend-of-the-court brief filed by the U.S. Department of Justice says that genes should not be patentable.

“We acknowledge that this conclusion is contrary to the longstanding practice of the Patent and Trademark Office, as well as the practice of the National Institutes of Health and other government agencies that have in the past sought and obtained patents for isolated genomic DNA,” they wrote.

The argument that genes in themselves (as opposed to, say, tests made from genetic information, or drugs that act on proteins made by genes) should be patentable is that "genes isolated from the body are chemicals that are different from those found in the body" and therefore are eligible for patents. This argument is, of course, completely silly, and apparently the U.S. government may now actually realize that."

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A New Species of Patent Troll

Geoffrey.landis Geoffrey.landis writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Geoffrey.landis (926948) writes "From the Wall Street Journal, there's an article warning that there's a new species of patent troll out there. These sue companies that sell products with an expired patent number on them. That's right, it's against the law to sell a product that's marked with an expired patent number. The potential fine? $500. Per violation-- and some of the companies have patent numbers on old plastic molds that have made literally billions of copies. Using whistle-blower laws, "anyone can file a claim on behalf of the government, and plaintiffs must split any fine award evenly with it."
You've been warned."

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E=mc^2 is a liberal conspiracy

Geoffrey.landis Geoffrey.landis writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Geoffrey.landis (926948) writes ""Conservapedia," was founded to be a conservative-tilted alternative to Wikipedia.
From the article: "To many conservatives, almost everything is a secret liberal plot: from fluoride in the water to medicare reimbursements for end-of-life planning with your doctor to efforts to teach evolution in schools. But Conservapedia founder and Eagle Forum University instructor Andy Schlafly — Phyllis Schlafly's son — has found one more liberal plot: the theory of relativity."
Yes, that's right: relativity is apparently a liberal plot. No doubt, the atomic bomb is a hoax, just like the moon landing and global warming."

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Man buys the police website to complain

Geoffrey.landis Geoffrey.landis writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Geoffrey.landis (926948) writes "When a Tennessee police department let its website expire, the site was purchased by a man who uses it to complain about the traffic cameras that gave him a $90 speeding ticket.
The bluffcitypd.com site now shows a cartoon police badge clutching a handful of money and smiling.
Also reported in other places, such as the Chicago Tribune and USA Today"

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George W. Bush embraces alternative energy

Geoffrey.landis Geoffrey.landis writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Geoffrey.landis (926948) writes "It's hard to believe, but former Texas oilman George W. Bush just came out in favor of alternate energy sources. At the American Wind Energy Association conference in Dallas, Bush said: "It's in our economic interests that we diversify away from oil. It's in our environmental interest. And, finally, it's in our national security interest." More details are on the green blog:

He had said in a State of the Union address that America was addicted to oil. "If you’re a guy from Texas and you say America is addicted to oil, it's a surprising moment," Mr. Bush said... These days, the former president said, "The overall trend in my judgment is that new technologies will find new ways to power our lives. I fully believe that hybrid plug-ins will be a transition to electric cars," he said, and that new ways to generate electricity will be needed.

In a time when climate-warming-deniers are screaming that shifting to alternate energy sources is going to destroy America's economy, it's amazing to see the former number-one Republican actually say that moving to alternate energy is in our economic interest, and new ways to generate electricity are needed Now if we could only get the ones who are still in power to understand this..."
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