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Statistician Creates Mathematical Model To Predict the Future of Game of Thrones

GiganticLyingMouth Re:Why use statistics? (115 comments)

Sure, but you'll need a time machine

12 hours ago
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Rosetta Code Study Weighs In On the Programming Language Debate

GiganticLyingMouth Re:C++ = Clear Language Choice. (165 comments)

Fortran doesn't have pointer aliasing. This allows the compiler to perform more aggressive optimizations

5 days ago
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Ask Slashdot: Finding a Job After Completing Computer Science Ph.D?

GiganticLyingMouth Re:List the STL? Seriously? (471 comments)

Of course, the STL was written by Stepanov before C++ was standardized. What the interviewer probably meant to ask about is the C++ standard library, which is similar but different. Or maybe they really were asking about the STL, in which case I wholeheartedly agree that bullets were dodged.

about a week ago
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The Growing Illusion of Single Player Gaming

GiganticLyingMouth Re:No trouble finding single player games.... (292 comments)

Most of those games you quoted are very old and OP has probably played them all and is looking for something new.

Wasteland 2 comes out this Friday (9/19) and Pillars of Eternity is still in Beta. Unless you've got a time machine that's about as new as it gets.

about two weeks ago
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This 'SimCity 4' Region With 107 Million People Took Eight Months of Planning

GiganticLyingMouth Re:Los Angeles (103 comments)

If only, Los Angeles has a vanishingly small subway system. One subway line that goes from downtown LA to North Hollywood, and an aborted line that was meant to go to Santa Monica but only made it to Wilshire.

about 1 month ago
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If Java Wasn't Cool 10 Years Ago, What About Now?

GiganticLyingMouth Re:Just don't try to write an OS in Java (511 comments)

Except that the original question only specified the parameter to be an integer, not whether it was signed or not (nor what range of values it could take)

about a month ago
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The Grumpy Programmer has Advice for Young Computer Workers (Video)

GiganticLyingMouth Re:Programming: You're doing it completely wrong (120 comments)

lambdas can be faster than say, function pointers, mostly because the compiler can have more information about pointer aliasing. They should be a wash speed-wise relative to loops. Also, you say functors, which can take a few forms; this can be a callable object (e.g. a struct with its operator() overloaded, no templates needed), a stored lambda function, or a std::function object (e.g. as created through std::bind, lambdas, etc). They all look rather different; do you find all of them unreadable? Not all of them require 'enormous' header files

about a month ago
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Researchers Find Security Flaws In Backscatter X-ray Scanners

GiganticLyingMouth Re:hehe (146 comments)

It was stated in a different article that they were unable to procure the current ones used in airports (millimeter wave), and that it was already rather difficult for them to acquire this one -- perhaps now you know why

about a month ago
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Interviews: Ask Bjarne Stroustrup About Programming and C++

GiganticLyingMouth Re:Templates all over again (427 comments)

Don't you think that implies at least some sort of effort to understand them?

Well apparently not, because you stated multiple points that are, as of today, patently false. Perhaps it was different in C++98, but (in case you didn't know), it's not 1998 anymore.

about a month and a half ago
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Interviews: Ask Bjarne Stroustrup About Programming and C++

GiganticLyingMouth Re:Templates all over again (427 comments)

Not as many as possible. Use the right tool for the right job, as always. But don't rule out libraries because they use templates -- that's downright silly. Templates are made for writing generic code, which maps very well to libraries. Lastly, I don't claim to be a *good* programmer, but I do at least make an effort to understand the language that I'm using.

about a month and a half ago
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Interviews: Ask Bjarne Stroustrup About Programming and C++

GiganticLyingMouth Re:Is the complexity of C++ a practical joke? (427 comments)

Might I ask what you feel to be unpleasant about C++11's additions? Do you have any specific cases in mind?

A lot of people will (and do) use the =delete syntax. Prior to that you would have to declare the method as being private, but this wasn't perfect. Class friend and member functions could still access them, and the errors would only be detected at link time. Alternately you could use boost noncopyable, but you can't always use boost. With the =delete syntax, errors are detected at compile time, and provide some semantic information about your code to anyone reading it.

Also, it's actually 6 implicit functions that compilers generate; you forgot about the copy-assignment and move-assignment operators.

about a month and a half ago
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Interviews: Ask Bjarne Stroustrup About Programming and C++

GiganticLyingMouth Re:Templates all over again (427 comments)

Sorry but this is nonsense. Templates aren't any slower than hand-written code. Compilers may have had problems with templates a decade ago, but template support among the major compilers nowadays are very solid and consistent.

You say "many programmers minimize their use of templates, both in their own code and in their use of templated library code" -- are you saying "many" programmers writing C++ don't use boost or the standard library? Because that too is nonsense. Many bad programmers perhaps?

Lastly, partial specialization is very convenient for performing compile time recursion, which is pretty essential to template metaprogramming.

about a month and a half ago
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Interviews: Ask Bjarne Stroustrup About Programming and C++

GiganticLyingMouth Re:Multiple Return Types? (427 comments)

When is C++ going to natively support multiple return types? i.e.

float sin, cos, angle; sin, cos := SinCos( angle );

Right now we can use a struct hack, but native support would be appreciated.

You could always just return a tuple, then use tie on the caller side. To use your example,

std::tuple SinCos(float angle) {
...
return std::make_tuple(sin, cos);
}

float sin, cos;
std::tie(sin, cos) = SinCos(angle);

Also, your last question isn't really a question, is it?

about a month and a half ago
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The Technologies Changing What It Means To Be a Programmer

GiganticLyingMouth Re:Some of us do still assemble, even now (294 comments)

The assembler? Then how do you intend to compile anything into machine code? Must be quite a project you have there

about a month and a half ago
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Ask Slashdot: "Real" Computer Scientists vs. Modern Curriculum?

GiganticLyingMouth Re:Much less should be written in C (637 comments)

If you change a private implementation detail in a class, you have to recompile everything which uses the class. This is the opposite of encapsulation.

Yes, that's what the PIMPL idiom is for. Here's a nice introduction to it .

As with most everything, there's a way to solve that problem in C++, it just takes some work and knowledge to know what, when, and how to use it. I do agree that the language is too big though; conceptually, C++ could be broken into 4 distinct components (C, STL, templates, OOP), as each have their own quirks and idioms that don't necessarily carry over well to the other, and some are even Turing complete on their own (ie template metaprogramming)

about 2 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: "Real" Computer Scientists vs. Modern Curriculum?

GiganticLyingMouth Re:Much less should be written in C (637 comments)

I'm not quite sure I understand your gripe properly. You're saying that since C++ has classes, and classes are defined in header files, that calling code is dependent on the class because... it's in a header file?

If it bothers you so much, use the PIMPL idiom. Or forward declarations where you can. Or template your calling code and write to static interfaces. You've got plenty of options, you just need to know how to use them. C++ is admittedly a very large (arguably too large) language, which is both it's most compelling feature and it's biggest drawback. You can use it for pretty much everything, but fully grasping the language and knowing when to use what feature takes time. This is partly due to trying to maintain backward compatibility with C, while still incorporating new language features. Because of this hodgepodge, iterative development, some dubious choices have been made. D is meant to take the good parts of C++ and cut out the bad; it is a good idea, and a lot of the foremost C++ experts are D supporters. It's a shame that D will probably never take off.

If you're going to complain about C++, at least use valid complaints. Like about how 2 primary aspects of the language (templates and OOP/dynamic polymorphism) are partly incompatible, or about how there's no dynamic multi-dispatch built in to the language still, or how there's no concepts, or how C++11 async doesn't really give task parallelism. (And yes, there are others, many others). But classes and header files? Cmon.

And yes, the famous, fictional interview...

about 2 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: "Real" Computer Scientists vs. Modern Curriculum?

GiganticLyingMouth Re:Beards and suspenders. (637 comments)

As other people pointed out: who wants to work for facebook?

I was citing your post. You're the one who used them as an exemplar. Why are you asking me this?

And: do you really assume I don't know?

I have no idea what this question is referencing

And, regarding that interviewer ... sorry: no one knows out of his mind how to regexp an HTML document ... depending on language to use it is even more complex. An interview question like this is utter nonsense.

Or how exactly do you again skip text inside of a tag, like attribute definitions, but match between an opening and a closing tag? If someone is using regexps to search for text inside of an HTML/XML document, he is a retard. But perhaps that is the expected answer?

And why the heck should it be relevant for Amazon to regexp HTML pages?

That interview question list is completely made up. (You are asked in a phone interview to WRITE error free CODE, correct syntax? ROFL)

I provided no judgment or commentary about whether I agreed or not with the interview procedure or questions. My point was merely that being able to operate on the bit-level is still useful, mandatory in fact, to work at the places you cite as not needing them. YMMV

about 2 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: "Real" Computer Scientists vs. Modern Curriculum?

GiganticLyingMouth Re:Beards and suspenders. (637 comments)

And as soon as you work for Facebook or Amazon, you will never have any use for 'bit bashing' again.

It's funny that you mention that. I've recently had to perform some interviews (as an interviewer), so I was looking around the 'net for some tips on how to be a good interviewer. Lo and behold I came across this piece by Steve Yegge, about the kind of questions he asks as an Amazon interviewer.

He lists "The Five Essential Questions" for phone interviews , one of which is, as you would say, 'bit bashing'. The full list is:

  1. 1. Coding. The candidate has to write some simple code, with correct syntax, in C, C++, or Java.
  2. 2. OO design. The candidate has to define basic OO concepts, and come up with classes to model a simple problem.
  3. 3. Scripting and regexes. The candidate has to describe how to find the phone numbers in 50,000 HTML pages.
  4. 4. Data structures. The candidate has to demonstrate basic knowledge of the most common data structures.
  5. 5. Bits and bytes.

So while you might not use bit bashing after you start working for those companies, you'll never get the chance to if you don't know how.

about 2 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: "Real" Computer Scientists vs. Modern Curriculum?

GiganticLyingMouth Re:Much less should be written in C (637 comments)

C++ has turned out to be a mess. It adds hiding to C without adding memory safety, an unfortunate feature combination unique to C++.

Adds hiding? You mean... encapsulation?

Is that the only thing you can think of that C++ adds to C? If so, that may explain why you have such a poor view of C++

about 2 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: "Real" Computer Scientists vs. Modern Curriculum?

GiganticLyingMouth Re:Real Programmers don't use GC (637 comments)

"If Java had true garbage collection, most programs would delete themselves upon execution"

– Robert Sewell

about 2 months ago

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