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Microsoft Announces Office 2016 and Office For Windows 10 Coming Later This Year

GoddersUK Re: No! (148 comments)

If you just write the occasional letter, yes. If you're a heavy user of general purpose office software then you will notice the benefits of moving off anything pre-2007. While the 2007-2010 and 2010-2013 changes are more incremental I think the 2007-2013 change is definitely worth it for heavy users. I always get the impression people who say things like you probably haven't used a more recent version of Office than 2003 because the changes are substantial and worthwhile. People always go on about how wonderful LibreOffice (or whatever they're calling it these days) and Google Docs are. They're not. They can do the basics but they can't take the semi-pro market like Office can. Sure, if you're typsetting a book use Latex and if you're plotting publication quality scientific graphs use Origin/Sigma Plot/etc. But for everything in between MS Office has no competition.

about a week ago
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Microsoft Announces Office 2016 and Office For Windows 10 Coming Later This Year

GoddersUK Re:They just move the menu items around (148 comments)

Yes, you keep using Windows 95. I mean I'm sure it's just as good to use as Windows 8.1, it's got complete feature parity and you're productivity will skyrocket from the modern interface and featureset.

about a week ago
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Science By Democracy Doesn't Work

GoddersUK Who'd have thought it... (496 comments)

...science relies on evidence and is not swayed by what I, arbitrary authorities or consensus believes. But this goes both ways:

Now I'm not familiar with the US vote. It does seem reasonable, as policy makers and legislators are going to have to respond to climate change in their legislation, that they decide whether they buy the arguments for it or not. And given that the US uses a democratic framework for legislating it doesn't seem unreasonable that the legislature uses a democratic vote to take such an opinion collectively.

You see, that's the great thing about science. It's true, they can't just vote it away. But it's not an authority - you can't demand congress address climate change just because the men in white coats say so - you have to address evidence based, logically sound arguments to them. And your opponents can respond with arguments of their own. And the adjudicator has to choose between them.

If you think that no one has the right to challenge the sanctity of the holy scientific truth then you're just as bad as the politician who thinks they can vote objective reality away.

So this vote may be stupid (or it may not be), but, inherently speaking, a group voting on how to collectively respond to some argument isn't necessarily.

about a week ago
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Uber Suspends Australian Transport Inspector Accounts To Block Stings

GoddersUK Re:The most beautiful thing ever! (299 comments)

Repeating yourself doesn't make your right. Assuming Uber works the same way in Aus that it does in London all their drivers and vehicles are required to be licensed by the local authorities. Typically this will include more stringent driving checks, criminal records checks, road-worthiness checks, proof of the appropriate professional insurance and so on. See here (sorry, stupid website - can't permalink). Now maybe Uber works differently in Australia, but I don't see why they would. Come back with some evidence, and I'll listen.

about two weeks ago
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Uber Suspends Australian Transport Inspector Accounts To Block Stings

GoddersUK Re:The most beautiful thing ever! (299 comments)

they are placing passengers at risk due to no valid license or insurance

People keep saying this, yet I've never seen any evidence it's true. In fact, on the contrary, here in the UK at least, Uber are licensed like any other private hire company. Not to mention the fact that, just about everywhere, running a business without appropriate liability insurance is illegal (and stupid) anyway.

about two weeks ago
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Lawrence Krauss On Scientists As Celebrities: Good For Science?

GoddersUK Re:It's not about the presenter. (227 comments)

Actually David Attenborough graduated from Cambridge with a degree in natural sciences (specialising in geology and zoology). And, actually, I think that he makes for a far better model of science communicator than these modern loud mouths/wannabe philosophers.

about two weeks ago
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UK Prime Minister Says Gov't Should Be Capable of Reading Any Communications

GoddersUK Re:Gotta stop all those law abiding terrorists... (329 comments)

Except, unlike with guns, the internet is multinational and there's no reason to believe that the government is going to (or even can) force foreign companies with no UK offices to comply. So unlike guns, even if it's illegal, just about every innocent person will continue to use strong encryption (TLS with PFS, for example) on a daily basis - potentially without even realising it.

about two weeks ago
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UK Prime Minister Says Gov't Should Be Capable of Reading Any Communications

GoddersUK Gotta stop all those law abiding terrorists... (329 comments)

The terrorists have no problem with breaking the law to kill and murder people on kamikaze missions... but I'm sure they're nice reasonable people who will stop using encryption if we make it illegal.

about two weeks ago
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The Luxury of a Bottomless Bucket of Bandwidth For Georgia Schools

GoddersUK Re:And the squirrels .. (117 comments)

I saw this. What kind of crazy squirrels does America have that can digest glass? Seriously, I can't imagine it does their insides any good!

*insert high fibre diet joke here*

about three weeks ago
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Beware Headlines Saying Chocolate Is Good For You

GoddersUK Re:oh noes... the chocolate industry (224 comments)

Oh, and the actual study in question had nothing to do with the Kuna people. I don't know whether the /. submitter or the CBC journalist got that wrong, though.

about three weeks ago
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Beware Headlines Saying Chocolate Is Good For You

GoddersUK Re:oh noes... the chocolate industry (224 comments)

It's hard to judge how good the research was because neither tfs nor any of the 3 tfas actually linked to the research paper.

And I don't think you read my comment either. I never said the work was rigorous, I said there's no allegations that the research was non-rigorous or of any other improper practice (emphasis added). I was responding to the AC who seemed to think that the source of funding magically altered the quality of the research without providing any evidence. And you haven't refuted me just by disagreeing.

about three weeks ago
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Beware Headlines Saying Chocolate Is Good For You

GoddersUK Re:Some scientists would still be very interested. (224 comments)

I'm going to go ahead and assume you have no idea how science works. For starters researching natural products, as these scientists did, is a very fertile starting ground when searching for a "cure for cancer". Unfortunately you seem to have bought into the myth that only big glamorous research is valuable, ignoring the facts that, by definition, we don't know what the outcome of research will be until we do it and that most glamorous research will probably mostly involve work that looks "mediocre" in value to you.

about three weeks ago
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Beware Headlines Saying Chocolate Is Good For You

GoddersUK oh noes... the chocolate industry (224 comments)

Would academic scientists in publicly funded institutions be so interested in the cocoa bean if the chocolate industry wasn't supporting so much of the research?"

I love the idea that this somehow invalidates the research. The researchers investigated what they could get funding to investigate, there's no allegations that the research was non-rigorous or of any other improper practice. Presumably the results are valid and therefore valuable. Further, presumably this research wouldn't have been done otherwise so we've got some additional research we wouldn't have done otherwise. So what if it supports someone's interests? We all benefit because now we know more about the world around us and what is, and isn't, good for our bodies. Now go and take your ad hominems elsewhere.

about three weeks ago
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Why We're Not Going To See Sub-orbital Airliners

GoddersUK Wright brothers (300 comments)

You know, I can imagine someone saying something similar to this to the Wright brothers. Just give the scientists, engineers and time the ability to work their magic and there's every chance someone will be able to turn it into a viable business.

about three weeks ago
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Writer: How My Mom Got Hacked

GoddersUK Re:How about educating your dumbfuck mother? (463 comments)

Second time in a day I've re-read a post I was replying to and realise I missed the point of the parent. No more /. for me until I've properly woken up in the mornings!

about three weeks ago
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Writer: How My Mom Got Hacked

GoddersUK Re:Be paranoid and careful (463 comments)

I just re-read your comment. And now I feel like an idiot.

about three weeks ago
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Writer: How My Mom Got Hacked

GoddersUK Re:Be paranoid and careful (463 comments)

Except a Time Machine is just a NAS with a custom OS. As already discussed many of these ransomwares will also encrypt files on any mapped drives you have write access too. It would certainly be possible for Apple to harden time machine against such an attack (as discussed above, by allowing write access to create new files but not to modify existing ones unless, say, using SSH or a web based interface or specifically elevating permissions after successfully challenging the user) but I've not heard anything to suggest that is the case.

about three weeks ago

Submissions

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GCHQ destruction of Guardian computers raises questions

GoddersUK GoddersUK writes  |  about 8 months ago

GoddersUK (1262110) writes "Remember when, in an exercise in pointlessness, men in black from GCHQ oversaw destruction of computer equipment that the Guardian had been using to report the Snowden disclosures? Well Privacy International are reporting that the Guardian let them take a look at the destroyed computers and they were surprised by what they found. Under the direction of GCHQ technicians the Guardian staff seemingly intentionally and specifically targeted apparently mundane components of the computers in question, including chips on the keyboard and trackpad controllers and the LCD inverter. This raises two disturbing possibilities: Either GCHQ's technicians are incompetent or they know something about computer hardware that we don't. Especially given that GCHQ knew the distruction was all a charade so there was no reason to be paranoid in performing it."
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The US vs. Europe: Freedom of Expression vs. Privacy

GoddersUK GoddersUK writes  |  about 8 months ago

GoddersUK (1262110) writes "Rory Cellan-Jones writes about the recent European Court judgement on the right to be forgotten in terms of US/EU cultural differences (and perhaps a bit of bitterness on the EU side at US influence online):

He tells me... ..."In the past if you were in Germany you were never worried that some encyclopedia website based in the United States was going to name you as a murderer after you got out of jail because that was inconceivable. Today that can happen, so the cultural gap that was always there about the regulation of speech is becoming more visible."... ...Europeans who have been told that the internet is basically ungovernable — and if it does have guiding principles then they come from the land of the free — are expressing some satisfaction that court has refused to believe that.

(And, certainly, it seems, here in the UK, that even MEPs keen on the principle don't really know how this ruling will work in practice or what the wider consequences will be. Video here."

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