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CloudFlare Announces Free SSL Support For All Customers

Guspaz Re:... and other services (66 comments)

Have some irony:

C:\Users\Guspaz>tracert www.spamhaus.org

Tracing route to cdn-cf.spamhaus.eu [190.93.243.93]
over a maximum of 30 hops:

    1 <1 ms <1 ms 1 ms 192.168.1.1
    2 10 ms 39 ms 14 ms 10.245.x.x
    3 11 ms 13 ms 10 ms 10.170.x.x
    4 10 ms 8 ms 17 ms xe-0-1-1_0-bdr01-mtl.teksavvy.com [206.248.155.109]
    5 16 ms 15 ms 16 ms xe-1-1-0_2210-bdr04-tor.teksavvy.com [192.171.63.161]
    6 22 ms 17 ms 23 ms gw-cloudflare.torontointernetxchange.net [206.108.34.208]
    7 17 ms 16 ms 15 ms cf-190-93-243-93.cloudflare.com [190.93.243.93]

Trace complete.

yesterday
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Sierra Nevada Corp. Files Legal Challenge Against NASA Commercial Contracts

Guspaz Re:Building a satellite is really (125 comments)

SNC wasn't going to launch DreamChaser, ULA was.

2 days ago
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Sierra Nevada Corp. Files Legal Challenge Against NASA Commercial Contracts

Guspaz Re:Past performance? (125 comments)

Untested? SNC has been around for half a century, and has extensive experience building satellites. They're the ones who built all those Orbcomm satellites that SpaceX is launching.

3 days ago
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Sierra Nevada Corp. Files Legal Challenge Against NASA Commercial Contracts

Guspaz Re:Past performance? (125 comments)

Neither Boeing's CST-100 nor SpaceX's Dragon v2 (which is substantially different from Dragon v1) have any past performance for orbital flights either.

3 days ago
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BlackBerry Launches Square-Screened Passport Phone

Guspaz Re:Awful awful timing of launch (189 comments)

If you want to do real work on a mobile device, a tablet would seem to be more appropriate.

about a week ago
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BlackBerry Launches Square-Screened Passport Phone

Guspaz Re:No USB charging? Nonstandard cable? (189 comments)

That may say more about a problem with the Targus thing you're using than anything else. My iPhone 4S running iOS 8 is still charging fine plugged into my Windows PC or my various battery packs... but the fact that you're using your BlackBerry's charger just goes to show that it can charge off regular USB without issue.

Now, it's definitely true that Apple went a non-standard route for high-power USB charging (charging over USB at amperages in excess of the half amp standard of USB 2), but the worst case scenario there is that it will charge slower, not that it won't charge at all, and the point becomes moot when most accessories (like decent battery packs) support both Apple's high-power standard and USB-IF's own. I think I paid $20 for my Anker battery pack, and my giant NewTrent one was pretty cheap considering it's got a battery of a size you might expect to find in a laptop. Both work fine with Apple devices.

about a week ago
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BlackBerry Launches Square-Screened Passport Phone

Guspaz Re:Awful awful timing of launch (189 comments)

What I'm aware of us that everybody is repeating the same tiny handful of stories/reports of bent iPhone 6 Plus phones over and over again, so it's not clear if the negative press represents a real problem, or just a handful of defective phones that has raised an uproar. They're still selling like gangbusters, and it'll probably take at least a few days or weeks before we can find out if "bendgate" is the result of defective units or an actual design flaw.

The Blackberry Passport, for its part, is ridiculously wide, roughly equivalent to a six-inch tablet (it's half an inch wider than the 5.7" Galaxy Note 4). The form factor will probably relegate it to niche status.

about a week ago
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BlackBerry Launches Square-Screened Passport Phone

Guspaz Re:No USB charging? Nonstandard cable? (189 comments)

Apple devices charge off regular USB just fine: lightning cables end in a regular USB 2.0 plug on the other end. That means it's a nonstandard cable, not that it doesn't support USB charging.

about a week ago
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BlackBerry Launches Square-Screened Passport Phone

Guspaz Re:Lacking developers. (189 comments)

If the primary reason to use a Blackberry device is because it can run Android apps, why not just use an Android phone in the first place?

about a week ago
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Is the Tesla Model 3 Actually Going To Cost $50,000?

Guspaz Re:Maybe 40k (393 comments)

Companies doing grid storage don't care what size the cells are. They're going to buy pre-built modules or units, and Tesla considers grid storage to be one of the biggest potential markets for the output of their GigaFactory.

about two weeks ago
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NASA's Manned Rocket Contract: $4.2 Billion To Boeing, $2.6 Billion To SpaceX

Guspaz Re:Six Missoins Each (188 comments)

Speaking as a fellow non-American, I'm thrilled. The better SpaceX does, the lower their costs will be, and the more likely that the CSA (Canadian Space Agency) will be able to afford their services.

The CSA's annual budget is only around half a billion dollars per year, around 25% per-capita what the US spends on NASA. That wouldn't have even been enough to afford a shuttle flight. But with SpaceX's pricing, Canada can afford to launch our own stuff via private industry. We've already used SpaceX to launch a satellite (CASSIOPE) much cheaper than the alternatives, and if SpaceX hits their manned spaceflight target of $20 million a seat, Canada could actually afford to do its own manned launch with SpaceX. As in, a flight with only Canadian astronauts would actually be something that our meagre budget could afford. And we can always use more Chris Hadfields :)

Basically, the better SpaceX does, the more Canada can do with its limited space budget. Exciting times!

about two weeks ago
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NASA's Manned Rocket Contract: $4.2 Billion To Boeing, $2.6 Billion To SpaceX

Guspaz Re:Six Missoins Each (188 comments)

They both got essentially the same contract, the dollar value represents what the companies bid for it, rather than establishing a first/second place.

Basically, the both won an equal contract. On the one hand, it sucks for SpaceX that they get less money to do the same thing, but on the other hand, it will put quite a feather in their cap to be able to demonstrate concretely that they can live up to their claims of doing it for less, which will give them a huge edge in the next round of contracts. Next time they can say "Look, we did everything just as well as Boeing, but we cost you a ton less. This time you should give us most of the flights."

about two weeks ago
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Microsoft To Buy Minecraft Maker Mojang For $2.5 Billion

Guspaz Re:Microsoft owns GPL software (330 comments)

I think that ship sailed when Microsoft started contributing code to the Linux kernel, although they had released lots of code under OSI-approved licenses way before that.

about two weeks ago
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Microsoft To Buy Minecraft Maker Mojang For $2.5 Billion

Guspaz Re:An end to XBox? (330 comments)

I once checked out the TV section of a Yodobashi Camera (and if you're ever in Japan, you really must visit a Yodobashi Camera, it's like every store of the floor is the size one or two BestBuy stores, except there's half a dozen floors or more). The brands of TVs on offer was very different from what you'd see outside of Japan. In most of the world, Korean brands like Samsung and LG are quite popular, but in that TV section (of what are probably the largest electronics stores in Japan), there was not a single non-Japanese television brand to be seen. Not a single Samsung or LG television was available.

about two weeks ago
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Chrome OS Can Now Run Android Apps With No Porting Required

Guspaz Re:Why not all apps at once? (133 comments)

- The difference is irrelevant, the apps are stored as platform-independent bytecode that (as of the next Android release) is then converted to machine code by ART or done on-the-fly by Dalvik itself. As a result, so long as Dalvik or ART supports the processor architecture, the application doesn't need to.

- As long as the ARM app doesn't use NEON (which I believe Intel's Houdini emulator doesn't support), it shouldn't have any problems running the ARM code on the x86 devices. In fact, you're likely to have better compatibility running emulated on x86 than you are natively on some older ARM devices.

about three weeks ago
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The State of ZFS On Linux

Guspaz Re:Unfamiliar (370 comments)

You're accounting only for full-drive failures. IIRC BackBlaze indicates failure rates are higher than 5% per year, but that's not really relevant. The bigger problem is a read error during a resilver. That's something that the drive specs indicate should be expected at least once during any resilver, although in practice I find it less likely than that.

If you're using mirrored pairs, any resilver is (by spec) highly likely to result in corruption due to unrecoverable read errors due to lack of redundancy. Resilvering a single drive in a raidz2 array, however, still provides you with redundancy to recover from any read errors.

about three weeks ago
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The State of ZFS On Linux

Guspaz Re:Unfamiliar (370 comments)

Yes, but write throughput is still increased, and not everybody needs more write IOPS. Furthermore, even with 8 disks you can build two raidz2 arrays and put them in a pool, at which point you've got the IOPS of two disks. And on top of that, you can use fast SSDs as ZIL cache devices.

about three weeks ago
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Chrome OS Can Now Run Android Apps With No Porting Required

Guspaz Re:Why not all apps at once? (133 comments)

Some points here:

- Most Android apps are Java bytecode, not native code, so the underlying processor architecture is irrelevant (for those apps)
- x86 is a supported Android platform, so many apps that do require native code have x86 binaries available
- Intel provides an ARM emulator for the x86 version of Android so that x86 Android devices can run ARM binaries
- Some ChromeOS devices use ARM processors to begin with.

about three weeks ago
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The State of ZFS On Linux

Guspaz Re:Unfamiliar (370 comments)

Only if ZFS is communicating with that higher level. A simpler solution is to just use ZFS's native RAID instead of treating a RAID array as a block device. I can't think of a single benefit to doing that, but I can think of lots of reasons why it's a bad idea.

about three weeks ago
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The State of ZFS On Linux

Guspaz Re: Unfamiliar (370 comments)

Sorry, brain fart. I meant "DEDUPE consumes insane amounts of RAM", not "BSD".

about three weeks ago

Submissions

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How to report Linux kernel violations?

Guspaz Guspaz writes  |  about 7 years ago

Guspaz (556486) writes "I recently bought an ADSL modem/router (the VersaXpress VER170PR) made by a company called VersaTek (http://www.versatek.com/). When I noticed that the modem ran Linux (2.6.8.1), as many routers do, and that it did not include any mention of the GPL, I sent an email to the company requesting a copy of the source. Their response was that the modem was made by an OEM in China, and that they didn't write any source code, and didn't have any to give.

I've sent them a second message explaining that selling or distributing their modem without a copy of the source or an offer to provide it is copyright infringement. I'd like to report it, but I have no idea how to proceed. Who should I contact to report a violation of the GPL as it pertains to the Linux kernel, and how should I contact them?"

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