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Asteroid Impacts May Have Formed Life's Building Blocks

Guy Harris Re:Drat! (46 comments)

There goes three years of catholic school out the window!

Presumably pre-1996 years.

about two weeks ago
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EU May Not Unify Its Data Protection Rules After All

Guy Harris Re:Thanks Momma Merkel! (55 comments)

Let's not forget this statement of Momma Merkel comes from the same woman who stated that the "Internet is virgin territory"

In no-longer-Soviet Russia, Internet is Virgin territory!

about two weeks ago
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DOOM 3DO Source Released On Github

Guy Harris Re:HP-UX (323 comments)

I had some opportunity to work with HP-UX (built GnuMake on it for a in-company build/QA system), it was always an interesting and very different beast. Is it still around in any form?

Yes.

about two weeks ago
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DragonFly BSD 4.0 Released

Guy Harris Re:No longer supports 32-bit architecture (66 comments)

Solaris has their own init deamon, SMF. *BSD has their own, in fact Linux is the only one who have used SysVinit for several years now.

Yes, I'm aware of SMF. However, *BSD's init isn't different from traditional init - in fact, it's arguably closer to traditional init than is SysVinit, given that *BSD init is modeled after Research UNIX init, which predates the AT&T run-level-/etc/inittab-based init. They both use rc scripts to launch non-Internet system services, unlike launchd and systemd.

about three weeks ago
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DragonFly BSD 4.0 Released

Guy Harris Re: No longer supports 32-bit architecture (66 comments)

They all do if you count inetd(3).

That launches IP-based services, but I'm thinking of daemons that 1) run as process 1 and 2) launch most if not all services on-demand, rather than having stuff run from rc scripts.

about three weeks ago
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DragonFly BSD 4.0 Released

Guy Harris Re:No longer supports 32-bit architecture (66 comments)

Desktops and servers are hardly the entirety of the world. They don't even dominate it. Ever heard of ARM?

Yes, but I don't see any support for it, or any non-x86 architecture, in the DragonFly BSD source tree, so I don't think DragonFly BSD is that interested in embedded systems.

If Linus felt that way about 32-bit, there would be no Android, or it would have to develop its own kernel. Sheesh. FreeBSD and linux are found in routers and such with very weak CPUs.

So they've made different choices than DragonFly BSD.

about three weeks ago
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DragonFly BSD 4.0 Released

Guy Harris Re:No longer supports 32-bit architecture (66 comments)

What does Unix have to do with the Linux kernel? *nix is used for various "Unixes"

What's a "Unix"?

Is it a system based on AT&T code? If so, how much AT&T code has to still be in it.

Is it a system that passes the Single UNIX Specification test suite and whose supplier is thus allowed to license the "Unix" trademark?

Is it a system with a Unix-compatible API?

formerly also because of possible trademark issues. Linux is not one of them.

Linux is not one of the first types of OS in that list (if there are any bits of code AT&T made publicly available that are in Linux userlands, they're probably small enough not to count), and I know of no Linux distribution that's passed the SUS test suite (unless K-UX is a Linux distribution), so no Linux distribution I know of is one of the second types of OS in that list.

Linux is (or, rather, most Linux distribution are) most definitely one of the third types of OS, and people do speak of those OSes as "Un*xes", at least, even if "*nix" is used only for the first type of OS.

about three weeks ago
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Does Being First Still Matter In America?

Guy Harris Re:Put your money where your mouth is. (247 comments)

I can't verify the source, but this article suggests the machines will be Power8 based. Assuming these are the machines in question.

No, those machines are being built for the Department of Energy (DoE); NOAA, for whom the machines being discussed in this thread are being built, is part of the Department of Commerce.

about three weeks ago
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LinkedIn Study: US Attracting Fewer Educated, Highly Skilled Migrants

Guy Harris Re:Perspective (338 comments)

I hear ya buddy. We've got a President who doesn't want to do things democratically and we had a major, society-altering law passed whose authors have nothing but contempt for us, the American people.

Yes, a law such as this one, as passed in the GP's country, would have done a better job than the law in question.

about three weeks ago
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Does Being First Still Matter In America?

Guy Harris Re:Put your money where your mouth is. (247 comments)

So much wrong in just a few sentences.

First, IBM didn't sell it's HPC group, or its Power Systems group.

Correct.

The computer in question wouldn't be made using x86

If the computer in question is the same one mentioned in IBM's 2012 press release, not correct - that speaks of "IBM iDataPlex servers", which are x86 servers, not Power Architecture servers.

about a month ago
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Amnesty International Releases Tool To Combat Government Spyware

Guy Harris Re:Amnesty International (95 comments)

Amnesty International has a terrible track record of attacking Western Democracies disproportionately more so than Dictatorships. I guess they like picking on easy targets, instead of actually trying to make a difference. When is the last time we heard them lobby government action in Africa or the Middle-East?

You mean like this, for Syria, or this, for Iraq, and archived campaigns such as this, for South Sudan, and this, for the Central African Republic?

about a month ago
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Does Being First Still Matter In America?

Guy Harris Re:Put your money where your mouth is. (247 comments)

As TFA mentions, IBM just sold its supercomputer division to a Chinese company (Lenovo).

What TFA says is:

IBM's decision to sell its x86 server business to Lenovo will turn the China-based company, in short order, into one of the largest HPC vendors in the world, according to IDC.

"Lenovo may become the number two HPC provider literally by the end of this year," said Earl Joseph, an analyst at IDC. Hewlett-Packard is number one. If not in the second position, Lenovo will be close to it.

The linked article says:

As a result of the deal, Lenovo is receiving a host of IBM products including its System x, BladeCenter and Flex System blade servers and switches, along with its NeXtScale and iDataPlex servers and associated software.

IBM, however, will still hold on to its System z mainframes, Power Systems, Storage Systems, Power-based Flex servers, PureApplication and PureData appliances.

I don't know what "[IBM's] supercomputer division" is, but it's not a division that solely develops and sells x86 servers; they also sell Power Architecture HPC systems.

However, at least in 2012, they spoke of iDataPlex servers for NOAA, so they sold that part of their supercomputer efforts to Lenovo. Whether they'll push for Power Architecture HPC systems for NOAA instead is another matter.

about a month ago
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Scientists Discover Diamond Nanothreads

Guy Harris Re:Elevator in the sky with diamonds (79 comments)

You wouldn't guess from the summary that the article title is "Going up! Cosmic elevator could reach space on a cable made of diamonds".

Breaking news: Slashdot submission headline less hyperbolic than TFA's headline.

In other news, Satan cuts ribbon to celebrate the opening of a new ski resort. Film at 11.

about a month ago
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Police Body Cam Privacy Exploitation

Guy Harris Re:"Datatilsynet" (301 comments)

In Norway we have something called "Datatilsynet". It's not private. It can't be private.

Are you giving away your freedom and privacy to private entities?

Presumably by "it's not private" you mean "it's not a private entity, it's a public entity" (in an article discussing privacy, the term "private" in the sense of the private sector of the economy should be used with care, to avoid confusion; perhaps Norwegian has separate words for "not part of the public sector" and "not to be made available to the public", but "private", in English, can mean both).

For those curious about Datatilsynet, here's their English-language Website.

about a month ago
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Berlin's Digital Exiles: Where Tech Activists Go To Escape the NSA

Guy Harris Re:No you don't, you just remember incorrectly (231 comments)

The Civil War was not about the oppression of slaves (contrary to popular belief). It was about the crushing of dissent.

I never said what the Civil War was about. I was merely responding to what appeared to be a complaint about the South's way of life having been destroyed; if that's what they were referring to, much of that way of life should have been destroyed, so the destruction of that way of life wasn't a bug, it was a feature.

Sadly, although the 13th Amendment to the US constitution finally added one more freedom that the Constitution defended, the "except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted" clause left a rather large loophole through which several states snuck (not that the North was a land of rainbows, magic ponies, and racial equality).

(And not that the Southern states were paragons of freedom even for white people, especially white people who wanted to teach slaves to read and write or didn't particularly want to participate in patrols hunting down runaway slaves.)

about a month ago

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