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Researchers Discover an "Off Switch" For Pain In the Brain

Half-pint HAL Re:Mindfulness is the best pain killer (66 comments)

But if you eliminate the fear of pain, that's most of the distraction gone.

about an hour ago
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Researchers Discover an "Off Switch" For Pain In the Brain

Half-pint HAL Re:All or nothing (66 comments)

Hmmm... this sounds like the symptoms I've been experiencing, only more acute. I think I'll get an appointment to see my doctor.

1 hour ago
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Google Told To Expand Right To Be Forgotten

Half-pint HAL Re:This is clearly futile... (176 comments)

Yes, there are legitimate reasons to use .com, but circumventing privacy law is not one of them. Google are perfectly capable of delisting the results for people who click through from the local site to .com.

9 hours ago
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Ask Slashdot: Best Drone For $100-$150?

Half-pint HAL Re:Gaaa! (102 comments)

No, the difference between a standard Toyota Prius and a Google self-driving Toyota Prius.

11 hours ago
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Ask Slashdot: Best Drone For $100-$150?

Half-pint HAL Re:Any 3D printer fanatics wanna chime in here? (102 comments)

Most quadcopters are made of ultralight materials. In terms of superstructure, large ones are often dense styrofoam, small ones use thin rigid plastic struts. 3D printer materials wouldn't cut it. As for the blades, the resolution of a printer wouldn't be fine enough and the blades would end up churning air rathe than cutting it.

11 hours ago
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Ask Slashdot: Best Drone For $100-$150?

Half-pint HAL Re:Better Question (102 comments)

If you can't jam, then the only option is destroy. Even if you can catch it in a net and manage not to drop it against the ground, it's almost definitely going to take some damage, whether that's just a bent prop or something more serious.

11 hours ago
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Google Told To Expand Right To Be Forgotten

Half-pint HAL Re:This is clearly futile... (176 comments)

Google's algorithm selectively decides what information to present. The decision to present out-of-date information about the guy was deemed unfair to him. I'm pretty sure Google will already have tweaked their algorithm to make older material less significant which, as the net grows larger year on year, can only be a good thing.

11 hours ago
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Google Told To Expand Right To Be Forgotten

Half-pint HAL Re:Global jurisdiction (176 comments)

They are demanding to apply their laws to the entire world.

No they're not -- they're demanding that google.com doesn't keep pretending not to know that a user is based in the EU when they've already geolocated the user by IP address. It's like a club bouncer IDing an underager then suggesting he use the back door.

yesterday
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Google Told To Expand Right To Be Forgotten

Half-pint HAL Re:China wants in on this deal too (176 comments)

If Europe can regulate what the whole world sees on Google, why not China?

If they do go through with it, let's at least have a www.google.us without the censorship. (Probably a good idea anyway.)

No, Europe wants to regulate what Europeans see on Google. Google knows when users are based in Europe, yet still allows them to dodge the law. If I lived in a country/state with legal cannabis and knowingly posted it to someone in a country/state where cannabis was illegal, I'd probably be breaking their laws. Google has a corporate presence in Europe, so they have to respect European jurisdiction.

yesterday
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Google Told To Expand Right To Be Forgotten

Half-pint HAL Re:THIS POST HAS BEEN BLOCKED (176 comments)

More seriously, is it possible under the law to replace "Right to be forgotten" links with a big red "THIS POST HAS BEEN BLOCKED IN YOUR COUNTRY, PURSUANT TO THE RIGHT TO BE FORGOTTEN"?

No, because the article has to be delinked from the search. Furthermore, there would be a risk of falling foul of defamation laws, as you could be interpreted as implying something about the subject of the search.

yesterday
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Google Told To Expand Right To Be Forgotten

Half-pint HAL Re:Send request to the site hosting the informatio (176 comments)

Consider also that while I personally would not be fussed if the world discovered the real name of "Half-pint HAL", but I post pseudonymously here so it doesn't become the first thing people see when they search for me. I use various pseudonyms (some unique, some repeated) on various different sites.

yesterday
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Google Told To Expand Right To Be Forgotten

Half-pint HAL Re:Send request to the site hosting the informatio (176 comments)

A search engine ruins your life not by merely "publishing" the false/outdated information, but by pushing it up to the top of the search results meaning that it's the first thing that people see. The right to be forgotten protects the subject from accidental discovery. That's a good thing.

yesterday
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Google Told To Expand Right To Be Forgotten

Half-pint HAL Re:This is clearly futile... (176 comments)

The proposal / request / whatever is totally useless because it is not going after the content. The content is still there and it is TRIVIAL to find by using an uncensored search engine. All this is is a giant make-work project.

If you go back to the original case, the problem wasn't just that the data was available, but that it dominated the search results and was broadcast whenever anybody searched for him. This is why it isn't censorship -- the information is not destroyed and can still be found if actively sought, but it makes it unlikely that anyone will just stumble across it unexpectedly.

yesterday
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Google Told To Expand Right To Be Forgotten

Half-pint HAL Re:This is clearly futile... (176 comments)

What's going through the EU's mind right now? "This is clearly futile, not working and doesn't stand a chance in hell of working... ...so let's do more!"?

No, it's "Google is deliberately flouting the law". I mean, seriously. They geolocate you, and direct you to a local service. That means that they know the law should apply. Then they actively offer to take you to another site that is "not in the jurisdiction". In many areas of law, once you prove yourself capable of doing something, not doing it is considered willful negligence.

yesterday
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Google Told To Expand Right To Be Forgotten

Half-pint HAL Re:some sharp knives in that European drawer (176 comments)

You claim that in spite of the bbc article we are discussing, plainly showing your ignorance while attempting to poison the well of this discussion.

You must have been reading a different article from the rest of us...

yesterday
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UK Announces Hybrid Work/Study Undergraduate Program To Fill Digital Gap

Half-pint HAL Re:Why the negativity (106 comments)

If the company has sufficient influence to make the course concentrate on the how that is most relevant to the company then this would be bad. They might as well just take the people on and forget the degree.

Ah no... that would cost the companies more. Don't you know that in the UK we pay our taxes so that companies don't have to...?

yesterday
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UK Announces Hybrid Work/Study Undergraduate Program To Fill Digital Gap

Half-pint HAL Re:Why the subsidy? (106 comments)

When I was at school (proper) typing was probably the most valuable IT skill we were never taught - although I think most kids these days can type fairly efficiently.

Still plenty of room for improvement though. I suggest awarding academic credit for high scores in Typing of the Dead (the original, not the remake).

yesterday
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UK Announces Hybrid Work/Study Undergraduate Program To Fill Digital Gap

Half-pint HAL Re:Hardly surprising (106 comments)

You would think that they would just run a script against some version control system to check if any of the submissions are too similar. It won't catch everyone, but it would at least catch the kids who can't even bother to cheat intelligently.

All current anti-plagiarism technology derives from prototypes made for Computer Science courses. When I was studying at Edinburgh, they were quite proud of their new technology, and rather than viewing it as "big brother" stuff, a lot of us students were more intriged by the idea of the tech.

yesterday
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Is Ruby On Rails Losing Steam?

Half-pint HAL Re:Everyone hates Ruby (279 comments)

One more: immutable.

And to expand on that: backtracking -- you can't roll back once you've destroyed your data. Right now, I'm engineering something using backtracking in Python, and any accidental mutation is a bloody bugger to track down.

yesterday
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UK Announces Hybrid Work/Study Undergraduate Program To Fill Digital Gap

Half-pint HAL Re:Why the subsidy? (106 comments)

I'm struggling to understand why this particular group of students should have such a heavily government subsidised education when they claim they can't afford it for the rest of us..

Isn't it obvious? We've got a general election in 6 months, and the guys currently in charge want to still be in charge in a year's time, so they want to be seen as the guys who did something to address the problem of unaffordable tuition fees, instead of the guys who caused the problem within months of the last election.

As for why computers, it's simply a way to give their regressive, exclusionist tactics an illusion of "progressivity". This is "real world" stuff rather than "ivory towers", so it's "economy". Yay for the world's oldest democracy.

yesterday

Submissions

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Half-pint HAL Half-pint HAL writes  |  about 8 years ago

Half-pint HAL (718102) writes "From Linutop.com:
Linutop is a Linux-based diskless computer. It offers a completely silent, low-power operation in an extremely small package. Its main purpose is to surf the Internet.
With Abiword, Firefox, GAIM, Totem media player and Evince PDF Reader, they expect to be able to sell the units to libraries and net cafes, and to developers of custom displays/interactive demos. No pricing information is on the website, but The Register reports a price of "280 ($368/£190)"."
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Half-pint HAL Half-pint HAL writes  |  about 8 years ago

Half-pint HAL (718102) writes "The Register reports that a mobile software company has been granted a patent on customised dynamic content on mobile phones. From the article:
UK patent GB2408658 talks a great deal about notifying client devices using a special signal, such as an SMS, which then triggers the client to fetch information from a server using an HTTP connection — in exactly the same way as an MMS message. But the novel component of this invention is that when the client application contacts the server (having received the specially formatted SMS) the server puts together a package containing only the latest and most pertinent content for that particular user. This just-in-time generated package is then downloaded by the client.
Patent GB2408658 seems somewhat confused. How it works: user recieves notification of new content; user follows link to retrieve content; page is generated on-the-fly accounting for any changes (eg in sports scores) subsequent to the original notification. So is this little more than a patent on a link to a dynamic webpage? Where's the difference between this and — for example — an online wedding list?"

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