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MIT Unifies Web Development In Single, Speedy New Language

Half-pint HAL Re:Try again. (189 comments)

Yeah. No-one will ever need anything that COBOL can't do. All these modern languages are just ego.

yesterday
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MIT Unifies Web Development In Single, Speedy New Language

Half-pint HAL Re:Ooh, I Have An Idea! (189 comments)

Plug-ins are too platform specific. Implement it in JS for a "run anywhere" solution.

yesterday
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The World of YouTube Bubble Sort Algorithm Dancing

Half-pint HAL Re:Bogus algorithm (64 comments)

The best solution is always dependent on the task and the dataset.

yesterday
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The World of YouTube Bubble Sort Algorithm Dancing

Half-pint HAL Re:Bogus algorithm (64 comments)

(Obviously I mean updates, not insertions.)

yesterday
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The World of YouTube Bubble Sort Algorithm Dancing

Half-pint HAL Re:Bogus algorithm (64 comments)

As others have said, bubble sort is efficient on mostly-sorted datasets. Bubbling sorting your database after every X insertions (for some value of X) or before a search (whichever comes first) makes the world a nicer place.

2 days ago
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The World of YouTube Bubble Sort Algorithm Dancing

Half-pint HAL Re: Call me conervative, but (64 comments)

Actually, insertion sort can be done with a single array structure. When you insert a value into the new list, you delete it from the old list. So the total len(old) + len(new) = len(original). You can use a single int to identify the partition between the segment of the array that represents the new list and the segment that represents the new, sorted list, and effectively do sort-in-place. Hell, it's not even an extra variable, as you would need that index to keep track of the next element to add to the new list anyway.

2 days ago
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Ars: Final Hobbit Movie Is 'Soulless End' To 'Flawed' Trilogy

Half-pint HAL Re:It looks like a friggin video game. (347 comments)

Did you read my message? I was referring to something JJ Abrams has said about his use of lens flares and the reason for them. I didn't say he was the first. My point about Babylon 5 wasn't about the quality or means of creation of the lens flare effects, but their result in terms of the overall atmosphere and sense of illusion. If you're looking for an argument, argue what I wrote. Otherwise it's just boring.

2 days ago
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Ars: Final Hobbit Movie Is 'Soulless End' To 'Flawed' Trilogy

Half-pint HAL Re:It looks like a friggin video game. (347 comments)

You defeat your own argument by bringing up lens flare. JJ Abrams says it adds immediacy by implying that the cameraman was actually there, filming it, and didn't have enough time to set up the camera to avoid it. What Abrams misses is that making it self-consciously "filmed" reduces immediacy, because it means that the audience isn't there. In Babylon 5, the lens flare was mostly restricted to outer space, not inside the station, and the effect was doubly powerful. Lens flare in space said "you are not here", and the viewer was consequently deeper immersed in the illusion of being trapped in a tin can floating in space.

3 days ago
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Ars: Final Hobbit Movie Is 'Soulless End' To 'Flawed' Trilogy

Half-pint HAL Re:It looks like a friggin video game. (347 comments)

It annoyed me more than it should that the one epilogue was the sailing to the west bit, and there was a modern braided synthetic rope in the rigging. Because elves are sophisticated.

3 days ago
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Ars: Final Hobbit Movie Is 'Soulless End' To 'Flawed' Trilogy

Half-pint HAL Re:Blah (347 comments)

Muscle-memory has a lot to answer for in typos. Quite often I end up typing "ing" for words ending -ing, eg withing, or "and" instead of -an.

3 days ago
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Hotel Group Asks FCC For Permission To Block Some Outside Wi-Fi

Half-pint HAL Re:Non-internet use cases. (291 comments)

Of course I meant to say "for anyone based in the US"...

4 days ago
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Hotel Group Asks FCC For Permission To Block Some Outside Wi-Fi

Half-pint HAL Non-internet use cases. (291 comments)

For anyone based in the UK who wants to make a submission against this, I suggest you base your argument on the versatility of wifi and its use in closed networks.

For example, there are apps for Android and iOS that let you use your phone as a NAS box (network addressed storage) and this would break it. Or apps that use wifi to use your phone as a remote control for the media player software on your PC.

If you build a list of the non-internet use cases for wifi, focusing particularly on activities business travellers are very likely to use, then it would be extremely hard for the FCC to find that Marriott's move isn't antagonistic to guests....

4 days ago
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Hotel Group Asks FCC For Permission To Block Some Outside Wi-Fi

Half-pint HAL Re:No, not "in other words" ... (291 comments)

Perhaps this is "Corporate Assholes" trying to monetize their investment in their hotel property and make money as most businesses are created to do?

No, it's them refusing to accept that they overestimated the value of wifi in the first instance. If the US is anything like the UK, the big chains will have been the first to jump on the "internet" bandwagon, and being the risk-averse cheapskates that they are, will have franchised out the internet to a third party. It's quite possible that Marriott don't even own the networking infrastructure installed in the building, and that they basically act as an agent by selling it to visitors. For a good few years, they got away with it, because they were selling it to business travellers who didn't care seeing as it was going on expenses -- heck, even when many smaller hotels were rolling out free wifi, some of the big hotels still offered paid-for internet only, and even then, it was wired internet ("if you don't have an Ethernet cable, please ask at reception"). Now they find themselves in a position where that business model has been blown apart because the single important class of customer -- the expense-account business traveller -- has an internet connection in his pocket.

IE. their business model was shit, and now rather than writing off the losses, they're trying to artificially shore it up.

4 days ago
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Hotel Group Asks FCC For Permission To Block Some Outside Wi-Fi

Half-pint HAL Re:No, not "in other words" ... (291 comments)

Yeah, but add in the blocking signals for all those devices, and even the hotel wifi will be goosed.

4 days ago
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Hotel Group Asks FCC For Permission To Block Some Outside Wi-Fi

Half-pint HAL Re:To FCC (291 comments)

Here in the UK, the problem big hotel chains have is that they sold off the wifi as a franchise, thinking it would be a marketing boon to have wifi, but without having to pay the installation costs themselves. But then wifi became heavily commoditised and al the smaller hotels set up their wifi themselves and ran it as a basic cost. By not stumping up for their own internal wifi, the big players backed themselves into a corner -- they weren't able to offer free wifi without buying out the contract and infrastructure (cabling, routers etc) from their partner, and why would a professional public wifi outfit give up one of their few sources of income? Particularly given the number of business travels who don't give two hoots about the price as they're just going to put it on expenses anyway...?

I suspect the situation is the same in the US, and the problem is that those pesky business travellers are now using tethered phones or portable hotspots. They're trying to re-establish an environment where the business travellers will just shrug their shoulders, pay the fee and expense it. Independent travellers and the sell-employed... well, they're just low-value collateral damage.

4 days ago
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Hotel Group Asks FCC For Permission To Block Some Outside Wi-Fi

Half-pint HAL Re:Interesting (291 comments)

Next thing you know, you'll be restricted to 100ml bottles of liquids...

4 days ago
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Amazon "Suppresses" Book With Too Many Hyphens

Half-pint HAL Re:from the what-until-they-get-a-load-of-this dep (291 comments)

A) A chicken-fried steak. What is one of those? (Now answered.)
B) The "when it's at home" is just a turn of phrase used to emphasise cluelessness. At least where I'm from.

4 days ago

Submissions

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Half-pint HAL Half-pint HAL writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Half-pint HAL (718102) writes "From Linutop.com:
Linutop is a Linux-based diskless computer. It offers a completely silent, low-power operation in an extremely small package. Its main purpose is to surf the Internet.
With Abiword, Firefox, GAIM, Totem media player and Evince PDF Reader, they expect to be able to sell the units to libraries and net cafes, and to developers of custom displays/interactive demos. No pricing information is on the website, but The Register reports a price of "280 ($368/£190)"."
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Half-pint HAL Half-pint HAL writes  |  more than 8 years ago

Half-pint HAL (718102) writes "The Register reports that a mobile software company has been granted a patent on customised dynamic content on mobile phones. From the article:
UK patent GB2408658 talks a great deal about notifying client devices using a special signal, such as an SMS, which then triggers the client to fetch information from a server using an HTTP connection — in exactly the same way as an MMS message. But the novel component of this invention is that when the client application contacts the server (having received the specially formatted SMS) the server puts together a package containing only the latest and most pertinent content for that particular user. This just-in-time generated package is then downloaded by the client.
Patent GB2408658 seems somewhat confused. How it works: user recieves notification of new content; user follows link to retrieve content; page is generated on-the-fly accounting for any changes (eg in sports scores) subsequent to the original notification. So is this little more than a patent on a link to a dynamic webpage? Where's the difference between this and — for example — an online wedding list?"

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