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Comments

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Dennis Ritchie, Creator of C Programming Language, Passed Away

Himring Re:Goodbye (725 comments)

Yea, screw Shakespeare. Somebody else woulda been Shakespeare right? Even Ben Jonson got, "O Rare Ben Johnson." I suppose you'da put it: "O w/e Ben Jonson...."

more than 2 years ago
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TN BlueCross Encrypts All Data After 57 Disks Stolen

Himring Re:Cheap, but what about ongoing costs? (140 comments)

$6 million is pocket change to a company that has $5.2 billion in annual revenue.

Right, but any money spent on IT is a waste to the stuffed shirts, until something blows up, which, inevitably, gets them off the fence. Telling the COs in a meeting, "our worst possible downtime with the current allotted budget might be as bad as 3 days," makes them all look at each other with satisfaction and approval, seemingly, ok with being down 3 days in theory. Then, after 3 hours of downtime, they are talking about outsourcing all of IT for 10 times the amount of budget they barely allowed that caused the downtime....

Short of it:
Pre-disaster: IT should be cheap if not free.
Post-disaster: IT will get all the money it needs, but a new crew.

more than 3 years ago
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Bashing MS 'Like Kicking a Puppy,' Says Jim Zemlin

Himring Re:The will to be free (648 comments)

Good point. The challenge is to not let an enemy define you.

Hannibal largely defined Rome, but then Rome beat Carthage, to then lose its republic in time....

more than 3 years ago
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Cosmological Constant Not Fine Tuned For Life

Himring Re:bad (536 comments)

The bible is a large, complex book, used for every purpose under the sun -- good and bad.

But we are now discussing upwards of 3 things as I see: religion, morals/ethics and the existence of god. I would like to focus on the last point, as that seems to be the focus of this entire story on /., and in the main thread. The fact that it quickly ... _quickly_ ... degenerates into the greater issue of how humanity fucks up religion (as it does all else), serves no purpose to this point.

The simple fact of whether or not there was a causer who caused causation (i.e., the cosmos), is an extremely simple question. I am not claiming to have the answer. Others here seem to know 'devoutly' what that answer is.

I'm a senior analyst by trade, and I work with younger guys who come to me with problems all day, seeking advice and answers. I have a set of principles that I provide them with when dealing with a problem, among which are:

-If it is now broke, when it was not before, then it is impossible to say, "nothing changed."

-To solve any problem, you _must_ start with the truth. This means, removing all the husks (the trash) of everything else currently in the way (attitudes, politics, deceptions, agendas). (This is pure existentialism).

-Lastly: I do not know the answer to that question. What you have provided so far does not contain the answer either. Claiming it is the answer, when it is not, does not mean it is. Basically: I don't know that, so you can't know that.

Once these things are generally resolved, the solution reveals itself.

Typically, on /., too much gets in the way of the real question, and the real answer is simply never addressed.

To focus on the issue of religion as a problem, when asking the question of the existence or not of god, will never get one to the answer of the original question....

more than 3 years ago
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Cosmological Constant Not Fine Tuned For Life

Himring Re:bad (536 comments)

As to the "brilliant post":

What if the one who believes in god does not believe he is a friend, nor dictates anything, nor will ever punish anyone for not following rules, nor does he give 2 fucking shits about anything in this universe? I am at this point frustrated over these stuff shirts. Apparently, a basic handbook on "isms" must be handed out. Thumb forward to the "Ds" in such a book, and look for the letters "eism."

"If a group of people does it, it suddenly turns into a religion."

Yes, and only religious people have ever done anything bad. No one has ever done a bad thing irreligiously. My god, gulags are as much figments of the imagination as this god guy....

/facepalm

more than 3 years ago
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Cosmological Constant Not Fine Tuned For Life

Himring Re:bad (536 comments)

"Each and every one of you stating facts that there's no way you can know...."

Apologies. I meant to say, "no way you can sanely believe in a god...."

We truly cannot know. Indeed, we are best to always claim unknowledge in all things, else, reality will blast us -- /queue Ringer....

more than 3 years ago
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Cosmological Constant Not Fine Tuned For Life

Himring Re:bad (536 comments)

Oh I entirely concur, and so does Bultmann, who called Christianity, "primitive."

God is, truly, "in the docks" as Lewis said. Modern man rightly has him (the traditional god) in the witness stand, and demands he make an account of himself. The doubt is well founded, understandable, as your post is too.

But this doesn't at all answer half or all of the questions, nor does it make the stuffed-shirt propped-up as "the religious man" any more than just that -- a stuffed shirt.

Sagan rightly extrapolates towards ET. But, logically, so does the theist towards god (now, let's make this "theist" someone well short of the "hearing the voice of god" that everyone props up here -- let's say his belief goes no further than, "I do believe there is a god."). If the journey to belief (and it is belief) that there is ET in the universe is 100 different empirical points, of which, we only have 30 available, then yes, Sagan is not mad at all to reason towards the 100th and final point (meaning, you're looking at the thing with the glowey finger). Then again, the theist who can only provide 3 of the 100 proving god is likewise no more insane. And I don't wish to argue what these points are because that leaves the boundary of what I'm talking about here, basic logic.

Folks fail in their syllogisms is all I'm saying. And, yes, belief is belief is belief, and each and every human has it/does it -- even every post in opposition to mine.

You're an atheist/agnostic/theist? You admit that's your belief? Good. You tell me that, no, that's the fact, and only those who believe against your belief are wrong. Now, now we've left reason and stepped into lunacy.

Schools failed when they quit starting with the Greeks and Romans. Schools failed when day one wasn't Socrates and the ability to go, "I have no clue, teach me."

Each and every one of you stating facts that there's no way you can know are a violation of all western thought has provided, and fuck, heh. I'll stop there, else, I say something like, "and we are doomed...."

C.S. Lewis was raised by a retired professor and avowed agnostic, who forced him to prove every thought. He said, "talking to him was like eating red meat and drinking strong beer."

I am truly on the fence/bridge with both groups. My stomach is as sickened by those with blind faith in god and those who railing against his existence.

Time for video games and alcohol....

more than 3 years ago
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Sharks Seen Swimming Down Australian Streets

Himring Re:PHFT! Nothing new! (210 comments)

Never heard of a drop bear. Just read the wiki. I assumed initially your dad died some how from spilling his drink....

more than 3 years ago
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Sharks Seen Swimming Down Australian Streets

Himring Re:Why? (210 comments)

Are you questioning the ability of /. and its community to aptly address serious issues, such as diet, the environment, existence of god, and how to meet/pickup women? Doest thou not know the power of the brain and the ability of geeks -- who can code -- to manage the rest of life?...

more than 3 years ago
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Cosmological Constant Not Fine Tuned For Life

Himring Re:bad (536 comments)

One should never argue by analogy as it gets tossed back as if from a jiu jitsu master, but you can't help it. And if there is a god and if religions are correct that he/she/it will hold us accountable for some reason or other, then yes, he/she/it is like a cop.

If not, then /queue Matthew Arnold....

But as one atheist scholar said of the books written by religious authors: "why must these christians be so darned good at writing?..."

more than 3 years ago
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Cosmological Constant Not Fine Tuned For Life

Himring Re:bad (536 comments)

You just described my entire family....

more than 3 years ago
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Cosmological Constant Not Fine Tuned For Life

Himring Re:Moderately Intelligent Design (536 comments)

"I bought an ant farm once. Those fellas didn't grow shit...." --Mitch Hedberg

more than 3 years ago
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Cosmological Constant Not Fine Tuned For Life

Himring Re:bad (536 comments)

My god is crom. He lives on his craggy mountain, and laughs his head off when my women die, and all my gold goes to the bottom of the sea. I pray to him for help, but if he doesn't help me, well, to hell with you crom!!!

more than 3 years ago
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Cosmological Constant Not Fine Tuned For Life

Himring Re:bad (536 comments)

Why is it that one must "hear the voice of God" to be a believer? Some mad men hear voices claiming there is no God. Again, it's the logic set that's broke here....

I for one believe in ETL. Whether a voice tells me that or not is irrelevant. Some folks need stuffed-shirts in order to win an argument, and never realize that, that's all they're doing -- beating up a stuffed shirt....

more than 3 years ago
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Cosmological Constant Not Fine Tuned For Life

Himring Re:bad (536 comments)

I've read a lot on Sagan's beliefs in ET, and they were hopeful to the full extent of what one hopes to find -- he was quite the zealot on the matter ("Contact"?).

"Belief" needs to be understood firstly, and I'm not sure I care to describe it further, other than referring to Descartes, who pretty much simplified the matter to its full extent. That being said, yes, even saying, "I don't know" is a belief. I believe I don't know.

Trust me, I'm married, and had to come home and get busted with lipstick in strange places. I can firmly tell you, that saying, "I don't know" is an avid belief. "Honey, I believe I really don't know." There's no way in hell I was gonna say, "I'm not sure what I believe regarding that lipstick stain...."

more than 3 years ago
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Cosmological Constant Not Fine Tuned For Life

Himring Re:bad (536 comments)

Concur. I believe my house will be there when I leave work and go home. It might not be. I could have been acid tripping all day that I had a house. Wtf is reality? I once saw a catholic lady cry because some asshat needed to convince her that it was nuts to pray to Mary. I think praying to Mary is idiocy, but wtf destroy some poor soul who wants to believe otherwise? Hell, there could be. To wit I say, "pray to Mary for me too! And hurry!"

The first problem is a problem of communication: that neither side is open enough to listen to the other. I've often found myself on the fence, but the arrogance and condescension of the butthole representing either theism or atheism serves as nothing but a stumbling block. First, get over yourself (general "yourself" there), then, let's talk. Better yet, let's drink a 12 pack and talk, cuz you're waaay to uptight to take seriously....

more than 3 years ago
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Cosmological Constant Not Fine Tuned For Life

Himring Re:bad (536 comments)

"It is arrogant to assume there isn't life outside our planet." --Carl Sagan

A belief is a belief is a belief. Sagan admitted, he no empirical evidence of this, but, only believed. If there is not any other life in the universe other than on earth (and I hope there is), then Carl's belief in ET is as nutty as any other.

I appreciate the believer -- whether it be the agnostic, the atheist or the Muslim. What I do not appreciate are those who reject others for not believing the same thing. And I feel sad for the arrogant, who look down on those who are _not_ in sync with what they claim are the "right" beliefs.

To quote Lewis responding to a letter by a self-avowed atheist: "As a former atheist I have to say you, Sir, are not one. You are a God hater, and a God hater is not necessarily an athiest...."

more than 3 years ago
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Cosmological Constant Not Fine Tuned For Life

Himring Re:Any need for this? (536 comments)

Cartwright: But why, if that's the case, are you unable to escape from this fortress?
[Evil blows him up]
Evil: That's a good question. Why have I let the Supreme Being keep me here in the Fortress of Ultimate Darkness?
Robert: Because you...
Evil: Shut up, I'm speaking rhetorically.

more than 3 years ago
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Cosmological Constant Not Fine Tuned For Life

Himring Re:Any need for this? (536 comments)

Supreme Being: Is it all ready? Right. Come on then. Back to creation. We mustn't waste any more time. They'll think I've lost control again and put it all down to evolution.
-Time Bandits

more than 3 years ago

Submissions

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30th Anniversary of the Wow! Signal

Himring Himring writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Himring (646324) writes "Today marks the 30th anniversary of the single most significant event, to date, that points to possible evidence of ETI. On this day in 1977, Dr. Jerry R. Ehman circled data retrieved from the "Big Ear" radio telescope of the Ohio State University Radio Observatory. The telescope has since been destroyed, and although other, modern telescopes have tried (such as the VLA) none of have successfully reproduced the results of that day. By and large, all possibilities of an earth-based signal causing the event have been ruled out as well as any possible natural phenomenon. Still, Dr. Ehman has remained reserved and stated that he doesn't want to draw, "vast conclusions from half-vast data." Here is the link to Dr. Ehman's 30th Anniversary Report."
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Himring Himring writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Himring (646324) writes "Wired has a story about a bill which died in CA thanks to the MPAA. SB1666, which would have stopped the practice of lying — I mean "pretexting" — in order to gain private information about someone. "The bill won approval in three committees and sailed through the state Senate with a 30-0 vote," but suddenly was stopped by the powerful MPAA who stated, "We need to pose as someone other than who we are to stop illegal downloading."

So, with bills such as this getting killed, how will HP execs be brought to justice? "Lying" seems to mean different things according to which side of the law you are on. Martha Stewart served time in a federal pen, not for any stock violations, but for simply, "lying to federal investigators." Now, the MPAA can lie to me and you in order to find out if we are downloading copyrighted materials.

Apparently, the MPAA has gone so far as to pay hackers upwards of $15,000 to hack into email account of torrent users. This is all under the aegis of "pretexting.""

Journals

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What's wrong with /. editors?

Himring Himring writes  |  more than 7 years ago Yes. This is an official rant/complaint/whine. I've had news submissions rejected in the past, but for the most part, I understood it. Someone else would submit it first perhaps, or the story was something only few would care about. And, heck, who isn't miffed when it happens? However, August 15, 2007 marked a pretty darn significant event IMO. It was the 30th anniversary of the most significant discovery, ever, pointing to the possible existence of ETI -- Extra Terrestrial Intelligence. I submitted the story on the same day and waited. As I waited for 3 days, watching the anniversary pass, watching the submission read "pending" and, believe it or not, watching submissions get posted such as The 25th Anniversary of the CD Drive, I began realizing that the thing was going to be rejected. I thought surely it was something others were on to, and it would get submitted and posted by another. This would have been more than acceptable to me, but it did not. /. never breathed a word about, to me, one of the most important "news for nerds" events ever.

So, I ask a legitimate question: what's wrong with /. editors? Overwhelmed? Tired? Bored? Favoritism? Are only 25th anniversaries good enough? I'll accept any answer. More than anything, I would like to hear from an editor proper. Trust me, if you give me a logical explanation I will understand. 'An' explanation is better than nothing at this point, and I still feel that something should be said about the 30th Anniversary of the Big Ear discovery.

Here is the submission. Check it and tell me if something is wrong. That way, I will do better with the next:

Slashdot Story Submissions
Preview Submission
30th Anniversary of the Wow! Signal
Space
Himring writes "Today marks the 30th anniversary of the single most significant event, to date, that points to possible evidence of ETI. On this day in 1977, Dr. Jerry R. Ehman circled data retrieved from the "Big Ear" radio telescope of the Ohio State University Radio Observatory. The telescope has since been destroyed, and although other, modern telescopes have tried (such as the VLA) none of have successfully reproduced the results of that day. By and large, all possibilities of an earth-based signal causing the event have been ruled out as well as any possible natural phenomenon. Still, Dr. Ehman has remained reserved and stated that he doesn't want to draw, "vast conclusions from half-vast data." Here is the link to Dr. Ehman's 30th Anniversary Report."

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Galaxies & other heavenly bodies....

Himring Himring writes  |  more than 7 years ago I told myself I would write in my journal today. Hey, if you try to post, but can't, please let me know by posting....

Human nature truly fascinates me. The older I get, the more I am intrigued by it. Reading people is an art and a valuable gift. If only I could've read people better up to now.... I think human relationships are best described by way of astronomy. I saw this cool show on the science channel of how galaxies dance around each other, collide, pass through, reform.... Some collisions benefit one galaxy more than another. Some galaxies lose more stars than they gain in the incident. Heavenly bodies, period, behave this way. Moons were smaller bodies tossed about, finally gathered-up by a larger body. All orbits are moving and changing, drifting futher apart or coming closer together. It's not noticable.

The same goes for human relationships. Friends and lovers come and go. Some relationships are growing ever closer. They will only end when the two people die. One can die but the other carries the relationship on, just as a heavenly body still perpetuated by the gravity of the missing partner. Others are growing apart. Marriages are dissolving. One partner knows it, says nothing, the other hasn't a clue. Or, maybe the one growing apart doesn't know it either, but can feel it. Maybe they never were as close as it was thought.

Some marriages or relationships go on for years with one partner constantly involved with others (affairs). The faithful partner never knew. Is it even a relationship at all? It is, but each person has a different perspective on it.

It's just tough growing up and realizing that role-models go away, friends and lovers leave and you must trode on. The one comfort is in knowing that others will come along to fill the place. Our job is to be as ready as we can, having learned from the past, so that we can be the best we can possible be for our future relationships....

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The Next/Next Admins

Himring Himring writes  |  more than 9 years ago MS is guilty of making the "next/next/next/finish" administrators who don't know wtf they're doing. MS, with this proliferation of "dumb" admins (yes, I called them dumb cuz they are) are what have provided the world with a very nice DDoS farm waiting to receive such things as codered. That thing will never go away cuz there are still boxes out there on the public network that are unpatched cuz the next/next admins don't even realize they're running an IIS server!!! This is a mind-boggling fact. The MS "Options Pack" CD (or whatever it was called) for NT4 server came ready to go with IIS and one had to do little more than next/next/finish their way through setting it up, and voila! a webserver you don't even realize is running (btw, everything has a friggin webserver on it these don't it?). Administration should be hard (are you listening microsoft?), and the fact that Microsoft has both dumbed it down and then built an insecure OS riddled with holes and wherein everything is connected to everything (MSTD) has created this cacaphony. We patch, we AV protect, we do it all to still have our large switches about once a year peg out at 100% (network goes down) cuz of some new worm broadcasting to the world, and it's due to the root-assumption of windows that they're just now trying to do something about (omg, i gotta stop cuz I'm gonna rant, ramble and roll).

Second and final point I want to make, is after considering all of the above, you then have to consider the fact that microsoft is an incredible PR machine/marketing machine. They control so much spin, and most upper IT managers get their talking points from these microsoft influenced "CIO Magazine" type crap. So, we little guys in the trenches meet with the big guys who already know what the "truth" is as microsoft has spun it. Thus, Linux is indeed not free, Firefox will be JUST AS BAD as IE once enough people use it, and Squirrelmail isn't really an email server cuz no real email server would be called "Squirrelmail."

My one haven is Dilbert. Dilbert isn't funny. It's a religious experience....

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Al Gore & The Internet

Himring Himring writes  |  more than 9 years ago Having a major in English lit and having studied linguistics, semantics and all that shit that I don't use to make a living now, and doing my best to be objective (read my journal), I must say that this issue of Al Gore's famous words regarding the Internet continues to fascinate me.

The mere fact that people defend, vehemently, what he said reveals to me that there's something to it. I.e., "me thinks he doeth protest too much," as one of Shakespeare's characters put it. Which means, the fact that there's all this buzz -- that we can't even discuss the Internet's history without 90% of that discussion going toward Gore -- tells me that surely there's "something rotten in the state of Denmark" (ugh, I'm wearing out the Shakespeare quotes).

1st and foremost, Gore did indeed contribute, perhaps more than any other in his day, to the Internet's development. Now, that means, as a government representative he did what his position could do and did more than any other.

So, did Gore tell the truth? Yes, there was truth in what he said (there's also truth in a joke, a lie, a heresy, and indeed in the truth itself), did his political opponents use his famous words to smear him? Yes. Did they find a weakness and exploit it? Yes. All of this is true.

As I see it, he was speaking the truth regarding some factual happenings, but he was also self-aggrandizing and exaggerating, and that's what bit him in the ass. He broke a cardinal rule of politics and he knew better, so no one should feel sorry for him or, really, defend him any longer (please, let's let this die). Always let your political enemies bury themselves when wounded. Always let your political friends defend you when possible, and always, ALWAYS, let your political friends puff your record. You should come across as humble, kind, gracious, etc. Gore puffed himself for himself all by himself and it cost him greatly. Good job in this thread on explaining the "truth" of the matter, but live with the fact that he screwed the political pooch otherwise....

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My political views

Himring Himring writes  |  more than 9 years ago I voted for Bush only because I knew Nader didn't have a chance. I am most impressed with the zealot underdogs such as Nader, libertines, etc. My basic assumption (having spent 10 years in the university system studying liberal arts and history) is that socialism is a failure. The new oligarchy is a failure too (corporatism -- as Nader tries to combat). The two prime evils -- representing socialism on the one hand and corporatism on the other -- is taxation and labor abuse (the workin' man and his struggles). Both have to be dealt with. Of the two I see taxation as the greatest evil. It is #2 on Gibbon's reason for the fall of Rome. Taxes do not work (it is the middle class who eventually suffers from taxation, not the rich). "Name a country that has taxed itself to prosperity." You cannot. Abusing labor doesn't work either, but is more easily dealt with IMO (lots to be said here, but I digress). All of this being said, there have been tangible results to a Bush administration and that is less taxes (yes, there are many negatives too, but they are out-weighed IMO). I know, cuz I paid less taxes now. From my experience and time (I'm highly political around the year and not just during elections -- I am 36 years old and have been voting since I legally could), the democratic party both raises taxes and bows to corporatism whereas the republican party only does the former (Bush Sr.'s tax hike not-withstanding; also, note the accomplishments of Reaganomics which rejuvinated the economy while at the same time workers died from lack of proper government regulations at factories -- a tragedy and testimony to corporatism, but highlights the balance needed). In any event, it is a mixed issue for me, and had Kerry won I would not have been upset, but I feel both corporatism and socialism would have thrived during his administration. My decision to vote as I did was not 100% ... not even close. I will say this: such pejorative remarks as you make does nothing but help what you hate. I sat through an entire interview of Bill Press on his new book and was fascinated by points he made. I was darn near ready to buy the book and read it ("10 Reasons Bush Must Go" or whathaveyou), when at the end of the interview he stated that only idiots vote republican. With that comment, I had no desire to learn anything else he had to say. You can catch more flies with honey than vinegar, as they say. In any event, there is no substance to your 4 types that vote for Bush. Believe it or not, thoughtful people vote for each candidate. I do not hate anyone who voted for Kerry. As a matter of fact, I respect them. Learn from Voltaire who said, "I disagree with what you say, but I would fight to the death your right to say it...." Also, attack an idea, grapple with it, struggle with it, force it into submission, but do not attack the person holding that idea. Only a socialist or an oligarchist would do that, and I'm sure you wish to be neither. Always remember the axiom of Socrates and his student Plato: "The unexamined life is not worth living...." Be the gadfly. Don't be the one who kills it (the death of Socrates)....

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FCC Regulations and Citizen Band (CB) Radio

Himring Himring writes  |  more than 10 years ago I checked the FCC's website, and regulations against profanity/obscenity when it comes to CB radio usage is covered under the general regulations for broadcasting that all broadcast devices must adhere to whilst using the airwaves.

I remember working at a retail, hardware store years back and we all had radios. Truckers would often drive down the nearby state highway and our radios would pick them up -- cursing and swearing included. One manager would get on the radio and tell them they were violating FCC regulations, and the truckers would laugh....

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Supernatural

Himring Himring writes  |  more than 10 years ago Other-natural, supernatural: these are simply words to describe what is not yet known, understood or comprehended.

Personal beliefs should have no part in finding truth -- objective truth. If there's anything one learns as life goes on and the speed bumps and pot holes have riddled ya to death, it's to not be zealous over anything. The liberal ends up a conservative, the conservative a liberal, the atheist a theist, etc.

We adhere to much/most of what the founders of Western civilization believed. If Plato is our model we have little problem with his sense of government, society -- if Aristotle then his sense of potential and physics. Yet, both believed in a force behind it all -- the demiurge, the "people worker" -- something driving everything. The one difference between the Greeks and us is that there is an aversion among serious thinkers -- academic-types -- and those who may make the same claims as the Greek founders of western thought regarding the demiurge. Why is this?

Lawyers teach us everything (tongue and cheek there), but I once argued with a lawyer who wanted his client to have something out of the agreement and who claimed that the something he wanted "didn't matter anyhow" -- I argued with him, "well, if it doesn't matter then let me have it." And he says, "no" and I said, "but you said it didn't matter" (no one ended up with it btw).

Since we can't know there is a God, then he must not be. Is this not the 6-pack thought on the matter? If we don't know then he could also -- be. Not mattering is the same as not knowing. It proves nothing and gets no one nothing. It doesn't get the atheist a single thing, nor the theist and both should be ashamed to have claimed any victory -- especially personal....

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Troll?!?

Himring Himring writes  |  more than 10 years ago Dear journal. Today, I was modded a troll. It hurts. Therapy sessions will be interesting next week:

http://slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=103134&cid=8786783

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