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Oracle CEO Larry Ellison Steps Down

Hussman32 Re:What's the background? (106 comments)

The only reason I can see is that he turned 70 years old a month ago. Why not spend a little of his time doing other stuff? Also, he's still chairman.

10 hours ago
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Apple Will No Longer Unlock Most iPhones, iPads For Police

Hussman32 Re:Riddle me this Batman (431 comments)

I thought about the DL after posting, and then thought about having a heart attack on my run where I don't carry the DL or anything else except for the phone on my arm or pocket. The comment above regarding the new health app is interesting.

12 hours ago
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Apple Will No Longer Unlock Most iPhones, iPads For Police

Hussman32 Riddle me this Batman (431 comments)

I'm cruising along and a brick smashes into my windshield, causing me to wreck and I'm unconscious. The local Public Servant wants to contact my wife, but the iPhone is locked. Do they have a way of getting that minimum amount of information? I'm all for privacy, but sometimes the Public Servants truly are that, and they are trying to help. (by the way, the brick part is true, but it was my wife's car and she was lucky enough, and had the presence of mind, to get off the road safely).

13 hours ago
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Apple Locks iPhone 6/6+ NFC To Apple Pay Only

Hussman32 Re:NFC isn't used for just payment (298 comments)

It seems your statement declares Apple said that they won't use NFC for other purposes. I don't believe they've said that, they've just finally put the NFC hardware in, more applications will come later. Presumably in a controlled-experience fashion.

My guess is they didn't have the real estate to handle the NFC hardware footprint before, but now that the phones are bigger...

yesterday
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NASA's Manned Rocket Contract: $4.2 Billion To Boeing, $2.6 Billion To SpaceX

Hussman32 Re:Wow, I am impressed (183 comments)

I would mod this up if I had points.

2 days ago
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Developing the First Law of Robotics

Hussman32 This answer is needed sooner than you think. (162 comments)

I think I saw this article about the ethics of self-driving cars posted here.

This also shows where a liberal arts education may come into the STEM world later, I have to admit my philosophy and engineering ethics courses were more cognitive than I thought they would be.

2 days ago
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WSJ Reports Boeing To Beat SpaceX For Manned Taxi To ISS

Hussman32 Re:If true, it's probably a good thing for Space X (196 comments)

Sure, and that's a good point (which I would mod up). When you get 3 billion, a lot more government oversight is involved (with review boards, and review comments). My point is perhaps the lesser contract will be better from an overhead standpoint.

2 days ago
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WSJ Reports Boeing To Beat SpaceX For Manned Taxi To ISS

Hussman32 If true, it's probably a good thing for Space X (196 comments)

When you get a government contract, you get government accountability requirements, especially with the high visibility contracts. I'm not kidding when I say the accountability requirements are often more than the technical requirements, and I wonder if SpaceX would be able to shift their business model to handling them. The second source contract may be perfect so they can use it as bridge money before they start doing private space flights.

2 days ago
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Ask Slashdot: What Are the Strangest Features of Various Programming Languages?

Hussman32 VB6 and no copy deep. (729 comments)

Old VB6.

Foo has object property Foo2, which has object property Foo3.

Dim aFoo as Foo

Dim bFoo as Foo

Dim b = Foo2

Set bFoo = aFoo

b = bFoo.Foo2

Why is that object not referenced?

Oh, no copy deep.

Drove me crazy writing copy methods.

about two weeks ago
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Welcome To Laniakea, Our New Cosmic Home

Hussman32 Re:Great (67 comments)

I'm curious why you want to repeal the popular election of senators?

about two weeks ago
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Do Readers Absorb Less On Kindles Than On Paper? Not Necessarily

Hussman32 iPad Kindle app observations (105 comments)

I have both an iPad and Kindle. A few things with the iPad...I touch a word, the dictionary entry comes up. This is quite helpful. I am used to referring to the progress bar so sequence recall isn't a problem. Some books have x-Ray enabled, and that helps with story cohesion. Basically, after I've spent a lot of time with the iPad reader, I find it as good or better than paper. Except for the beach.

about a month ago
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Report: Nuclear Plants Should Focus On Risks Posed By External Events

Hussman32 Re:already done (133 comments)

The reactors are fine during an earthquake because they are effectively bolted to bedrock, and the move with the earth. There was a serious earthquake a few years ago at the Kashiwaszaki-Kariwa site, and the primary systems didn't move at all. There was a lot of damage to the switchyard and non-safety systems, and there was some water sloshed out of the spent fuel pool, but the reactor started up fine after all systems were requalified.

about 2 months ago
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Amazon's Ambitious Bets Pile Up, and Its Losses Swell

Hussman32 Re: surpising (168 comments)

Down four, buy more!

about 2 months ago
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How a Solar Storm Two Years Ago Nearly Caused a Catastrophe On Earth

Hussman32 Re:FUD filled.... (212 comments)

Semiconductor plants use a relatively small amount of electricity to continuously spin large flywheels, when they lose power, the generators start up almost immediately.

about 2 months ago
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How a Solar Storm Two Years Ago Nearly Caused a Catastrophe On Earth

Hussman32 Re:FUD filled.... (212 comments)

Actually professor you might want to take a second look at those figures. A nuclear plant relies entirely on *already produced electricity* for safe operation. With a normally functioning grid, this is not an issue. Take that out of the picture (in a scenario like a CME hit) and it will have to fall back on site generators (the local turbine generation is likely to go down with the grid) which hopefully will have been isolated from the effects of the CME and can be instantly switched in to the site system to take over and shut the plant down. However, if any of those switching components went bad during the CME hit, it could be hours before they are repaired, which starts to push the cooling safety margins to the limit (the plant is, after all, still producing heat as if it had a job to do). There are certainly good disaster plans in effect at nuclear plants for situations similar to this, but do you really want to test them all at once? There are bound to be holes. Mushroom cloud style explosions are out of the question, but we know from experience with Fukushima that all kinds of bad things can happen (including lots of little explosions of errant hydrogen) when plants go dark and can't be shut down safely.

I'll update a couple of points, when a plant loses off-site power, it immediately scrams and they have to remove decay heat (the neutrons stop reacting), which drops exponentially from 6-7% core power to less than 1% in about a day, and far less than 1% in 10 days. The generators are normally sized to handle shutdown cooling until power could be restored (but your comments are true, everything can fail, in the case of Fukushima, the entire emergency generator system was destroyed by the tsunami). I would also note that most plants are designed to react the hydrogen in a more controlled manner, the Fukushima 'explosions' were actually by design, although granted the videos don't appear that way.

about 2 months ago
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NASA: Lunar Pits and Caves Could House Astronauts

Hussman32 Re:NASA is spying on me (157 comments)

I saw a lecture in 1991 about the issues of living on the moon, and the underground habitat was a given. The issues that were showstoppers (among other things) were 1) water, 2) ability to manufacture concrete, 3) ability to safely do construction (power, tools, people moving things around in spacesuits). This talk was geared to a large scale habitat, something much bigger than the Mars One.

about a month ago
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NASA: Lunar Pits and Caves Could House Astronauts

Hussman32 Re:no wild day-night temperature swings... (157 comments)

With no atmospheric shielding, heat transport via radiation energy is still very high. If the sun is shining on an object that doesn't have 100% reflectivity (or zero adsorption), it'll get hot.

about a month ago
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Coddled, Surveilled, and Monetized: How Modern Houses Can Watch You

Hussman32 It's the automation that scares me (150 comments)

I'm in my early 40's, and I'm just now seeing the Powers That Be (PTB) do and monitor things that I had only envisioned in my paranoid fantasies in the 80's when I first read '1984.' Throughout the whole time I was always modestly comforted by the 'safety in numbers' idea; if I'm not out shooting people or blatantly planning the overthrow of the government, then the PTB won't have the human resources to go after me and I should be left alone.

But now it's getting scary because the PTB don't have to watch me, the digital monitoring, and more importantly the digital analysis, has made it to where they can keep tabs on everything you do without spending human resources to do it. There is no longer safety in numbers because the algorithms can build the list and it can be executed efficiently.

So what's next? I'm not thrilled with some of my activities prompting which browser ads that I see, but I am bothered that companies could change their pricing strategy based on whether or not I'm motivated enough to change to another vendor when I'm not satisfied. I'm even more bothered that insurance companies know my private health records and could deny me coverage because of them, even if they were obtained with the expressed statements that conversations with your doctor are private.

Crap, I always used to roll my eyes at the Wearers of the Tin Foil Hats, but maybe technology has caught up to their paranoia. It's not going to be long before a fly lands in a printer and someone mistakes my name for someone else and my life is ruined.

about 2 months ago
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An Army Medal For Coding In Perl

Hussman32 One thing to keep in mind... (192 comments)

“Gentlemen, the officer who doesn’t know his communications and supply as well as his tactics is totally useless.” -- General George S. Patton, USA

Remember before criticizing the US Army, it's considered the best in the world, largely because of quartermaster capabilities.

about 3 months ago
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A Physicist Says He Can Tornado-Proof the Midwest With 1,000-Foot Walls

Hussman32 Reminds me of one engineer's maxim (501 comments)

In theory, everything works in practice. In practice, it doesn't.

about 3 months ago

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