Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Report: Nuclear Plants Should Focus On Risks Posed By External Events

Hussman32 Re:already done (112 comments)

The reactors are fine during an earthquake because they are effectively bolted to bedrock, and the move with the earth. There was a serious earthquake a few years ago at the Kashiwaszaki-Kariwa site, and the primary systems didn't move at all. There was a lot of damage to the switchyard and non-safety systems, and there was some water sloshed out of the spent fuel pool, but the reactor started up fine after all systems were requalified.

yesterday
top

Amazon's Ambitious Bets Pile Up, and Its Losses Swell

Hussman32 Re: surpising (168 comments)

Down four, buy more!

3 days ago
top

How a Solar Storm Two Years Ago Nearly Caused a Catastrophe On Earth

Hussman32 Re:FUD filled.... (212 comments)

Semiconductor plants use a relatively small amount of electricity to continuously spin large flywheels, when they lose power, the generators start up almost immediately.

3 days ago
top

How a Solar Storm Two Years Ago Nearly Caused a Catastrophe On Earth

Hussman32 Re:FUD filled.... (212 comments)

Actually professor you might want to take a second look at those figures. A nuclear plant relies entirely on *already produced electricity* for safe operation. With a normally functioning grid, this is not an issue. Take that out of the picture (in a scenario like a CME hit) and it will have to fall back on site generators (the local turbine generation is likely to go down with the grid) which hopefully will have been isolated from the effects of the CME and can be instantly switched in to the site system to take over and shut the plant down. However, if any of those switching components went bad during the CME hit, it could be hours before they are repaired, which starts to push the cooling safety margins to the limit (the plant is, after all, still producing heat as if it had a job to do). There are certainly good disaster plans in effect at nuclear plants for situations similar to this, but do you really want to test them all at once? There are bound to be holes. Mushroom cloud style explosions are out of the question, but we know from experience with Fukushima that all kinds of bad things can happen (including lots of little explosions of errant hydrogen) when plants go dark and can't be shut down safely.

I'll update a couple of points, when a plant loses off-site power, it immediately scrams and they have to remove decay heat (the neutrons stop reacting), which drops exponentially from 6-7% core power to less than 1% in about a day, and far less than 1% in 10 days. The generators are normally sized to handle shutdown cooling until power could be restored (but your comments are true, everything can fail, in the case of Fukushima, the entire emergency generator system was destroyed by the tsunami). I would also note that most plants are designed to react the hydrogen in a more controlled manner, the Fukushima 'explosions' were actually by design, although granted the videos don't appear that way.

3 days ago
top

NASA: Lunar Pits and Caves Could House Astronauts

Hussman32 Re:NASA is spying on me (156 comments)

I saw a lecture in 1991 about the issues of living on the moon, and the underground habitat was a given. The issues that were showstoppers (among other things) were 1) water, 2) ability to manufacture concrete, 3) ability to safely do construction (power, tools, people moving things around in spacesuits). This talk was geared to a large scale habitat, something much bigger than the Mars One.

about two weeks ago
top

NASA: Lunar Pits and Caves Could House Astronauts

Hussman32 Re:no wild day-night temperature swings... (156 comments)

With no atmospheric shielding, heat transport via radiation energy is still very high. If the sun is shining on an object that doesn't have 100% reflectivity (or zero adsorption), it'll get hot.

about two weeks ago
top

Coddled, Surveilled, and Monetized: How Modern Houses Can Watch You

Hussman32 It's the automation that scares me (150 comments)

I'm in my early 40's, and I'm just now seeing the Powers That Be (PTB) do and monitor things that I had only envisioned in my paranoid fantasies in the 80's when I first read '1984.' Throughout the whole time I was always modestly comforted by the 'safety in numbers' idea; if I'm not out shooting people or blatantly planning the overthrow of the government, then the PTB won't have the human resources to go after me and I should be left alone.

But now it's getting scary because the PTB don't have to watch me, the digital monitoring, and more importantly the digital analysis, has made it to where they can keep tabs on everything you do without spending human resources to do it. There is no longer safety in numbers because the algorithms can build the list and it can be executed efficiently.

So what's next? I'm not thrilled with some of my activities prompting which browser ads that I see, but I am bothered that companies could change their pricing strategy based on whether or not I'm motivated enough to change to another vendor when I'm not satisfied. I'm even more bothered that insurance companies know my private health records and could deny me coverage because of them, even if they were obtained with the expressed statements that conversations with your doctor are private.

Crap, I always used to roll my eyes at the Wearers of the Tin Foil Hats, but maybe technology has caught up to their paranoia. It's not going to be long before a fly lands in a printer and someone mistakes my name for someone else and my life is ruined.

about three weeks ago
top

An Army Medal For Coding In Perl

Hussman32 One thing to keep in mind... (192 comments)

“Gentlemen, the officer who doesn’t know his communications and supply as well as his tactics is totally useless.” -- General George S. Patton, USA

Remember before criticizing the US Army, it's considered the best in the world, largely because of quartermaster capabilities.

about a month ago
top

A Physicist Says He Can Tornado-Proof the Midwest With 1,000-Foot Walls

Hussman32 Reminds me of one engineer's maxim (501 comments)

In theory, everything works in practice. In practice, it doesn't.

about a month ago
top

The Rise and Fall of the Cheat Code

Hussman32 Re:DLC's sold as cheat? (178 comments)

One where I see it is 'Hay Day' on the iPad. I downloaded it to play with my nieces and nephews (the Daughter loves it too at five years of age). It's a farm resource management game, and they have inventories that can only be upgraded when you randomly receive objects. However, if you pay for diamonds and money, you get the upgrades. Only once did I pay to get my daughter something, and I realized that this would be a never-ending money pit.

It is a pretty fun game if you're into that genre though.

about a month ago
top

The Rise and Fall of the Cheat Code

Hussman32 Re:DLC? (178 comments)

Heh, me too. My first read on that potential haiku made me think he was a jazz drummer.

about a month ago
top

Half of Germany's Power Supplied By Solar, Briefly

Hussman32 Re:Thanks for pointing out the "briefly" part. (461 comments)

According to NREL, it varies but is roughly 8 acres per megawatt for large stations. 22 gigawatts is 22,000 megawatts, so that's about 176,000 acres of land.

about a month ago
top

NOAA: Earth Smashed A Record For Heat In May 2014, Effects To Worsen

Hussman32 Re:GLobal warming scien is simple (547 comments)

why are so many people her suckered by pundits?

Pay attention: 5) CO2 in the atmosphere is increasing. Falsifiable, and tested. 6) The VAST majority of excess CO2 in the air is generated by humans. Falsifiable, and tested.

That's it. That is global warming. If you disagree with that, then you need to prove where the science is wrong. I look forward to your noble prize winning paper. If you read that and still think it doesn't impact the climate(climate change) then you need to show where the absorbed energy is going.

Some of you are very disappointing, falling into ad hom attacks and bad science. Scien that can trivally be checked out. But no, some of ypu moron keeps spouting the same crap. AGW is a scientific fact.

Re 5: The CO2 concentration is controlled by the temperature and pH of the oceans. The pH is not driven by CO2 as it's a weak electrolyte, and the overall pH of the ocean is about 8.0 (which is alkaline). CO2 equilibrated water pH is about 5.5. If air CO2 concentration is rising, it's because the ocean (which may be warming from something like undersea volcanic activity or dozens of other natural phenomena) belches it out.

Re 6: False. Check the data (http://www.grida.no/graphicslib/detail/the-carbon-cycle_a224#). Natural sources are 90 gigatons from the ocean interactions, 60 gigatons from land based sources. 10 gigatons at most from human interaction. There are 750 gigatons in the air.

Nobody said the climate isn't warming, we're in a 10,000 year warming period compared to recent history. The question is what humans have done to influence it, and that question is far from resolved. I agree it warrants further study, and the overall the effects of reducing pollution are positive, but let the questions be answered by the scientific method, not rhetoric and politics.

about a month ago
top

NOAA: Earth Smashed A Record For Heat In May 2014, Effects To Worsen

Hussman32 Re:Is it if A then B, or is it if B, then A? (547 comments)

It's not a mystery. The solubility of CO2 in water decreases with increasing temperature (dissociation constant of water increases, increasing hydrogen ion concentration, which pushes the equilibrium of carbonate towards molecular H2CO3, then CO2). Anyone who has opened a can of cold soda and let it get to room temperature has seen this.

Regarding inventories: The ocean inventory is 155,000 gigatons with 1,000 gigatons in the thermocline, and there is 150 gigatons annually of exchange. Human contribution is 10 gigatons annually, which would be in the measurement error of the other sources.

We need to reduce pollution, so if the climate change arguments will drive a large population that is generally uninformed towards greater efficiency, then great. But don't slaughter legitimate scientists for being appropriately skeptical. That is, after all, the fundamental tenant of the scientific method.

about a month ago
top

I suffer from jet lag ...

Hussman32 Of course it depends... (163 comments)

If I travel from the West Coast (my home) to the East Coast (where many of my customers work) each week for a month, I'm toast. If I travel to Europe, I'm toast for three days afterwards. If I travel to Asia, I'm toast for four days.

If I travel to the East Coast once, I'm tired the next day.

about a month ago
top

The EPA Carbon Plan: Coal Loses, But Who Wins?

Hussman32 Re:What kind of burdens? (268 comments)

Economic burdens too. Natural gas is much cheaper than before (about half from 2008), and as it was the most expensive fuel for the major generating stations, its cost basically controlled the minimum profit obtainable (the plants are relatively cheap to build on a per megawatt basis compared to coal, nuclear, wind).

about a month ago
top

The EPA Carbon Plan: Coal Loses, But Who Wins?

Hussman32 Re:No winners economically (268 comments)

The grid is a conduit from the generating station to the customer, and is effectively a capital expense that is most likely paid for already. The grid operating costs are very small compared to the generation costs, and there wouldn't be a revenue source for a grid company if they were forced to separate (if there were it would be artificial and in unregulated markets they would eventually zero this value out). Note that because storage isn't really practical yet, any time there is a change in electricity demand, the generating station needs to follow the load by increasing/decreasing the fuel that is consumed and reducing the generator load. This would have to happen regardless of who ran the grid, and the same operating challenges would be present, it wouldn't help solar adoption. The best way for solar to be adopted more readily is to make the solar panels cheaper.

about a month ago
top

Parents Mobilize Against States' Student Data Mining

Hussman32 What this hurts (139 comments)

Let's say they start datamining and storing whether or not a child has received mental health care. Then what? Kids and their parents will prevent their children from getting the needed health care in order to prevent their child from being classified as 'aberrant' by what is well-known to be an inconsistent psychological practices.

Even worse. It will hurt redemption stories. In my own experience, I probably had too much fun when I was a kid. My grades were good but my friends were a varied lot, and some of them were not well-regarded by The Powers That Be (note I was in a small town, nails that stick out get hammered down). But I got wise, worked hard and smart on my education, and I'm doing well for myself. Would this have been possible if I were tracked during high school and automatically relegated to 'one of those ruffians?'

The parents are right to complain about this, much more harm than good comes from it.

about 2 months ago
top

Solar Impulse 2 Makes First Flight

Hussman32 Bravo! (34 comments)

There will be a million negative posts (maybe not here) about practicality, weight, viability in weather etc., but they have a plane that flies using solar power, which is a much better performance than all of the naysayers expected from them before yesterday.

Good for them, I'm impressed.

about 2 months ago

Submissions

Hussman32 hasn't submitted any stories.

Journals

Hussman32 has no journal entries.

Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...