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Comments

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Ask Slashdot: How Do I De-Dupe a System With 4.2 Million Files?

I(rispee_I(reme Re:CRC (440 comments)

GPL.txt

about 2 years ago
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Tree's Leaves Genetically Different From Its Roots

I(rispee_I(reme Re:Say what? (80 comments)

Those who want to read it need not settle for a wikipedia editor's summary.

The story was originally printed in the March 1962 issue of Amazing Stories. Scan available here.

Also, Asimov's original title for the story, "What Is This Thing Called Love?" is restored in his short story collection, "Nightfall and Other Stories".

about 2 years ago
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Barnes & Noble Cuts Prices on Nook Color, Tablet

I(rispee_I(reme Re:Really? (154 comments)

Cyanogenmod 7 runs on the Nook Color, making it a full-fledged android tablet, now for 10% less money.

While technically the Nook Color still something of a content feeder spoon, since the tablet form factor lends itself more to consumption of content than creation, it's not strictly a pipeline for Barnes and Noble content, as your post implies.

I use mine mainly to read comic book scans. Now, for a modest $149,. you can read every Batman ever.

about 2 years ago
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uTorrent Adds "Featured Torrents" Ads — With No Opt Out (Yet)

I(rispee_I(reme Re:Not surprised (399 comments)

Running 2.2.1 here, also.

It can be found here, if anyone is seeking it.

Fair warning: Versions prior to 1.8 don't support magnet links.

about 2 years ago
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Why Internet Pirates Always Win

I(rispee_I(reme Re:no, totally wrong (360 comments)

Our culture simply doesn't value non-corruption. So maybe we need to yield to others who do have such a culture.

Chinese officials face the death penalty for accepting bribes. I predict they will go far with such a policy.

about 2 years ago
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Why We Love Firefox, and Why We Hate It

I(rispee_I(reme Re:Forced Upgrades? (665 comments)

Firefox version history.

Note that the 3.6.x lineage continues to receive updates to fix security holes and improve stability. The most recent was March 13, 2012.

The download is here.

Install it, set the appropriate update options, and enjoy.

Best of all, I have yet to encounter an extension that doesn't work with it.

The trick is to disable extension version checking.

Most extensions will work fine, even when Firefox says they won't (based on the extension target version number not matching your Firefox version).

about 2 years ago
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Australian Billionaire Wants To Build Jurassic Park-Style Resort

I(rispee_I(reme Re:Wasn't this the plot of a movie? (409 comments)

Not in the novel. Spielberg changed the ending of the movie to allow for a sequel.

about 2 years ago
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Koch Bros Study Finds Global Warming Is Real And Man-Made

I(rispee_I(reme Re:But the real question is... (769 comments)

1990's - "But the real question is, is climate change really occurring?"

2000's - "But the real question is, is climate change caused by humans?"

2010's - "But the real question is, is climate change a good thing or a bad thing?"

2020's - "But the real question is, how will we deal with this famine?"

The only climate change deniers for a long time now are people who are either too lazy to change or have a stake in not changing. Looking at you, auto and oil industries.

about 2 years ago
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Feds Plan 'Fog of Disinformation' To Track Information Leaks

I(rispee_I(reme Re:Should rename to derpa (263 comments)

Phone books also do this, since the list of phone numbers is not eligible for copyright.

If another party publishes a list of numbers containing the mistakes, that proves they didn't compile their list independently.

about 2 years ago
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How Steve Jobs Changed Google Plus

I(rispee_I(reme Re:Let the guy fucking rest already... (243 comments)

Actually, it's my understanding that patent terms in Hell are quite reasonable- life of the creator plus 7 years.

more than 2 years ago
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China Secretly Clones Austrian Village

I(rispee_I(reme Re:priacy 2.0 (329 comments)

Well, to be fair to Scotland, my research indicates that the Tennessee Parthenon is made of concrete, while the Scottish one is made of stone.

Obviously, no true Scotsman fashions a temple out of concrete. ;)

more than 2 years ago
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Ray Bradbury Has Died

I(rispee_I(reme Re:Collected Short Stories (315 comments)

This is the much better Bradbury collection. I have both, and the one you linked to omits some classics, in favor of his more recent work.

Also, I was just researching Ray the other day, spurred by thoughts of his story of being compelled to "LIVE FOREVER!" at a carnival... I found this picture, which makes me laugh a little. You can almost see the thought balloons:

Ray: "Why yes, it IS an honor to have your picture taken with me.
Laura: "I thought this award was for CHRISTIAN authors..."
George: "First man on Mars, hell of a guy!"

more than 2 years ago
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Firefox 13 Released, Debuts Brand New Tab Page and Homepage

I(rispee_I(reme Re:Go Firefox! (320 comments)

I tried Chromium. There is a problem: I've become addicted to tree-style tabs, courtesy of the Firefox extension.

Chromium/Chrome had this feature natively for a long time, until the developers disabled it in a sneaky-Pete maneuver that pissed off a bunch of people.

The obvious response, to write a Chromium extension for Tree-Style Tabs, is not an option. The Chromium plugin API does not expose the functionality necessary to do so.

Webkit (Chromium/Chrome's layout engine) seems to be a little faster than Gecko (Firefox's equivalent), but I would prefer to use a browser that gives the user (ME!) control over it, even at the cost of some rendering speed.

The time I would gain in rendering efficiency would probably be lost trying to scan this, as opposed to this.

more than 2 years ago
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'Eco-Anarchists' Targeting Nuclear and Nanotech Workers

I(rispee_I(reme Re:Do they realise... (426 comments)

For shame. I assumed you were talking about Leia.

more than 2 years ago
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Where's HAL 9000?

I(rispee_I(reme Re:It's not just specialization, there is also fea (269 comments)

'"'That would be #2 "Ignore the premise that the CR supports and pick on the illustration'"

Those who use analogies should be prepared to defend them. I admire the craft displayed in the creation of the Chinese Room scenario. It seems on the surface to be a well-intended thought experiment for the purpose of shedding light on whether Artificial Intelligence is possible. Upon closer examination, the conclusion forced by it is foregone, and it serves primarily to insult the author's opposition.

A better thought experiment would be to replace the human with a black box that behaves exactly the same. For some reason, the presence of a human in the room incites an emotional response. Stripped of the author's semantic legerdemain, it is no longer so certain that the room does not "understand Chinese".

In any case, I target the premise directly. The premise, as I understand it, is that the "Chinese Room" does not understand Chinese, and that's it's absurd to suggest that a room could do so.

However, that fails to take into account that, in the Chinese Room scenario, the human occupant is part of the room, and by all accounts understands Chinese. Ignoring this is like removing the hardware from a workstation enclosure before benchmarking it.

Ultimately, the measure of "understanding Chinese" is being able to carry on a meaningful conversation in Chinese. The alternative is to define thinking as "something humans do". If that's your perspective, I'll grant nothing but a human will ever be able to perform actions that by definition can be performed only by a human. (I suspect that even if our intellect is surpassed by machinery, homo sapiens will remain unsurpassed in its tautological vanity.)

Would you say that a Chinaman's brain does not understand Chinese, since there's no Chinaman inside his skull to understand Chinese for him?

Wikipedia lists five categories of replies to the Chinese Room scenario. You only listed 4. The omission is left as an exercise for any interested parties.

more than 2 years ago

Submissions

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Mac OS X 10.8 Limited to App Store/Signed Apps by Default

I(rispee_I(reme I(rispee_I(reme writes  |  more than 2 years ago

I(rispee_I(reme (310391) writes "The newest preview release of the Macintosh Operating System is configured to prevent applications from running, unless they are signed by Apple. This includes applications found on the App Store. While this setting is optional, it is enabled by default. Is this the latest step in a series of restriction on using Apple platforms for general-purpose computing?"
Link to Original Source
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Google Hides Cached Search Results

I(rispee_I(reme I(rispee_I(reme writes  |  more than 2 years ago

I(rispee_I(reme (310391) writes "Google has moved the links to cached web pages in its search results, hiding them inside the new "instant preview" JavaScript popup, which requires mousing over search results and a brief loading time to view. As a side effect, disabling instant preview also removes your access to cached web pages. Over at Google Support, the reaction to the change is less than enthusiastic."
Link to Original Source

Journals

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Review: Abuse

I(rispee_I(reme I(rispee_I(reme writes  |  more than 9 years ago

Today's review is for Abuse, a gpl'ed sidescroller (surely you know that means the source code is available), with public domain content, which is strange and unusual, and also means the entire game can be downloaded free of charge, here.

The linked page hosts a Windows port of the game, and that is what this review is relevant to, but ports exist for many other operating systems, and if you're running one, you probably know how to use google.

Abuse steals pages from the respective books of Metroid and Contra, and adds mouselook, making it the only 2d platformer I've played that supports (hell, requires) a mouse and keyboard control scheme. This sounds awkward, but mouselook works unexpectedly well in this style of game, and makes Samus and the Contra boys seem like poor marksmen indeed.

While it plays like a hybrid of the two console classics mentioned above, save games are implemented, as are quicksaves, which gives you the option of playing through console style, saving only when the save points come up, or creeping through as though you were playing Quake, saving every few feet. You'll probably end up doing the latter; the difficulty spikes relatively early.

Oh yeah, there's a story: You're the lone survivor (aren't you always?) in a prison taken over by a failed experiment and filled with mutants with laser beams attached to their heads. This is a paraphrasing, but you get the idea. Cue dark, spooky corridors and explosives.

Which sound like explosives should: bang. Sound effects are on point and the music is mostly atmospheric. I believe that with a few exceptions (such as the Super Mario Brothers overworld music), the less you notice the sound in a game, the better it does the job of involving you, and I hardly noticed the sound in Abuse.

Abuse offers network play over TCP/IP, serial cable, modem, or IPX. (Special note to coders: Make a client/server mod for Abuse so we can have 32 player 2d sidescrolling deathmatch! Please? It worked well for zDoom...) Now, all of the above is impressive for a free game, but it also includes a level editor. So you can make your own killing grounds, or even single player levels, if you're lame.

Anyway, Abuse is a little under 3 megs, and packs a whole lot of game. I recommend it. If you're feeling frisky, try the newer version, which adds higher resolution graphics, also linked to at the above page. By the way, I've seen the author of this port post to slashdot a few times, so big ups to you for the fine effort, Jeremy Scott.

update: Abuse actually takes up a little over 9 megs on the old hard disk. The download is less than three megs, though

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Review: N

I(rispee_I(reme I(rispee_I(reme writes  |  more than 9 years ago

N is the best Flash game I have ever played, so discard any expectations of objectivity. If you are no longer interested in reading the review, I advise you to form your own opinion by downloading it here.
Everybody else, feel free to continue reading.

As mentioned above, N is written in Flash, and is thus available for Windows, Mac, and Linux, in no particular order. Unlike virtually every other Flash game I've played, the purpose of N is not to display advertisements, or nag you to register; it is an actual videogame. The genre is an old favorite of mine, the 2d platformer, and the difficulty is reminiscent of Contra without the infamous Konami code. This, in spite of the fact that you have infinite lives.

Yes, that's right. Infinite lives. You may continue playing until you give up in frustration. But I get ahead of myself. N puts you in a level, all of which is visible with no scrolling, in the style of Donkey Kong. You are a very well animated Ninja, and your goal is to exit the level within the time limit. There are gold coins, too, and each adds two seconds to your time. So far, par for the course. What sets N apart from the myriad similar games is a physics engine that makes it almost as much fun to kill the ninja as it is to strive for the exit. To my knowledge, it is the first use of ragdoll physics in a 2d game, although if I'm wrong, I'm sure I'll be corrected.

The first few levels are a slow warm up, allowing you to grow comfortable with wall jumping and the additional demands the physics engine adds to controlling the Ninja. On level three, mines show up, and not two long after that... robots, the sworn enemy of all ninjas. The enemy AI is among the best I've seen in such a simple game, and even after you learn its rules, it is still challenging. Not too long after that, the game becomes so demanding you'll find yourself biting back curses like Yosemite Sam with each of your deaths. And those deaths, I'm sorry to say, are your fault. The simple controls (left and right arrows to walk; spacebar to jump) leave no room to blame anyone else, which is a hallmark of many great games.

With over 200 levels, a price of free, and able to fit on a floppy disk, I would say that most Flash-capable computers should be able to find room for N on their hard drive. Note: Go into options and set spacebar as the Jump key. You're only setting yourself up for heartbreak otherwise.

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I(rispee_I(reme I(rispee_I(reme writes  |  more than 9 years ago

Welcome, and abandon hope. I will be using this journal to document kick ass games that I am playing. As forewarning:

Things I like:
1) Opensourcedness.
2) Realtime combat, as opposed to turn-based.
3) Cheap things, preferably free.
4) Multiplayer.
5) 2d platformers of the old school variety.

Things I don't like:
1) DRM'ed games.
2) EA XXXX '## sports "games"
3) Practically anything from EA.
4) MMORPG's or other games with a monthly fee.
5) 3d games that are 3d for no reason.

Hopefully that gives you a feel for what will be on display here. Now I'm going to get busy reviewing N, so I can change my sig.

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