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Comments

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PayPal's Two-Factor Authentication Can Be Bypassed Using eBay Bug

InfiniteBlaze Re:unable to replicate findings. (33 comments)

I misread. This is a new hole. My apologies.

about 2 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: IT Personnel as Ostriches?

InfiniteBlaze IT is tough like that... (2 comments)

Tech pros have access to essentially everything. We have to know the ins and outs of every piece of software, have access to everyone's user accounts, and access to all storage locations. Because of that, we have to maintain strict confidentiality. It's best to keep that information to yourself, educate users on best practices, and ensure that proper procedures for security are followed.

about 2 months ago
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Ode To Sound Blaster: Are Discrete Audio Cards Still Worth the Investment?

InfiniteBlaze Re:Slashvertisement event horizon (502 comments)

Contributor is an employee of referenced article's owner, I assume, since all of his posts come from the same site.

about 3 months ago
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Kingston and PNY Caught Bait-and-Switching Cheaper Components After Good Reviews

InfiniteBlaze That's a shame. (289 comments)

Kingston has been my go-to brand for at least a decade. I've used some others for performance, but Kingston was always rock solid, with great customer service. It saddens me to hear this.

about 3 months ago
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Congressman Introduces Bill To Limit FCC Powers

InfiniteBlaze Re:Good Sign (176 comments)

Exactly which cable company is NOT providing telephone service these days? They're telecoms now, plain and simple. The skirt around regulations by claiming "different technology", but it serves the same purpose, and seems like the same thing to the general public. It would seem you're against strict regulation. What will keep telecommunications providers from inspecting every packet that crosses their wires and holding up smaller businesses for protectio...I mean, transit fees? If I pay for 50Mbps bandwidth, and Netflix pays their provider for 50Tbps of bandwidth, but Comcast decides they should be making more money, what stops them from throttling Netflix traffic in exchange for more money? Streaming a video might take...2-3Mbps, right? The number crunchers at Comcast, though, see that Netflix traffic on their network takes up some 50%+ of the total traffic, and they want to ride the gravy train. So, they'll hold up Netflix for more dough, and Netflix will pass on the upcharge to their customers - making Netflix look like the bad guy to people who don't understand how it all works. Shady stuff, man, and we shouldn't give that kind of power to Comcast or At&t or anyone else.

about 4 months ago
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Registry Hack Enables Continued Updates For Windows XP

InfiniteBlaze Re:This act is highly illegal (322 comments)

Changing the key is not illegal. Using that change to access data which Microsoft has explicitly deemed outside your legal access IS illegal.

about 4 months ago
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The Neuroscience of Computer Programming

InfiniteBlaze Re:Sounds like a solid theory (161 comments)

I've never heard of Chinese++...isn't Chinese hard enough without making it more complex?

about 7 months ago
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The Neuroscience of Computer Programming

InfiniteBlaze Sounds like a solid theory (161 comments)

Programming languages are very much like spoken languages. If you understand the origin language, or have an innate ability to infer meaning, it is possible to naturally understand a new programming language. I studied C++ in high school, so Java and C# are familiar and easily understood. The structures make sense, and if I don't immediately know offhand what something does, I can infer from the surrounding code. The same holds true for spoken languages. English is my first language, and I studied German in school. I never formally studied any other languages because that wasn't my passion. My passion was working with computers. However, I can generally infer the meaning of spoken Spanish in the same way I would deduce the function of unfamiliar code. I look for parts I recognize, use them to help decide what the unfamiliar portion means, and test my guess.

about 7 months ago
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Android 4.4 Named 'KitKat'

InfiniteBlaze Re:Alphabet (247 comments)

"Alpha", "Beta"....?

1 year,28 days
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Intel Plans 'Overclocking' Capability On SSDs

InfiniteBlaze Re:Why... (106 comments)

Thanks. I responded to that aspect of it earlier, but I appreciate your taking the time to remind me of what we're dealing with here. I hope this upcoming hardware is an indication bus speeds will soon catch up to the performance metrics of the devices they are connecting.

about a year ago
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Intel Plans 'Overclocking' Capability On SSDs

InfiniteBlaze Re:Why... (106 comments)

No, that means improved longevity. Performing operations on the data before it is written to the storage medium does not improve the speed.

about a year ago
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Intel Plans 'Overclocking' Capability On SSDs

InfiniteBlaze Re:Why... (106 comments)

That's counter-intuitive. "Running processes" on data does not make the data travel faster. If using compression improves speed, there is a bottleneck somewhere that allows the data to pool in cache. When the interface reaches the speeds that eliminate the bottleneck, we'll really have some fast drives.

about a year ago
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Intel Plans 'Overclocking' Capability On SSDs

InfiniteBlaze Why... (106 comments)

would I want to use compression at all, if my goal is speed? If maximizing total capacity is not the concern, I would use none of the drive for compression. I think the point to be taken from this is that Intel is recognizing that storage capacities for SSDs are reaching the point where compression is no longer necessary to make the technology a viable alternative to mechanical drives, and we will now begin seeing the true speed potential of the technology.

about a year ago
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Ask Slashdot: Light-Footprint Antivirus For Windows XP?

InfiniteBlaze WinXP is essentially EOL... (294 comments)

ditch it for Linux. So much of what we do on PCs now is through a browser, they won't really be able to tell a difference. Ubuntu is extremely easy to learn and does not need a powerhouse to run. Installation is a breeze and updates are as easy as on Windows.

about a year ago
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Computer Repair Company Takes Revenge on Devious Customer

InfiniteBlaze Re:Ouch. (3 comments)

In the interest of being political, I will not expound upon the fault in your description of the problem. Suffice it to say that it's hooey. RAID isn't magic, and it isn't terribly complex. You add drives to an array, and that's handled by the drive controller. Most RAID controllers wipe the drive clean when you create an array, which would have destroyed all of his data. It wouldn't have just been "corrupted". I can think of maybe two scenarios where there might be "telltale signs" of a failed attempt to create a RAID array, but neither seems to apply in this case. Regardless, for some reason, your story piqued my interest, so I went ahead and searched on your customer's name. The first article of significance I came upon was this: http://www.complaintsboard.com/complaints/nerds-on-call-c443471.html It was on the third page of a Google search for the name listed in your "original source" link. I'd say his claim seems to back up my suspicion - the technician(s) assigned were not competent, and for you to come to a place where geeks hang out and try to besmirch the name of a customer for whom it seems the service was not just poor, but HORRIBLE is a smear on your own name. I'm not going to continue to chastise you. I imagine your fears of actually having to pay for the mistakes of one of your techs (or yourself) are enough to worry about without having your peers tell you the ways in which someone screwed up. My best advice is that when this actually goes to court, since it seems the man's disability claim has been affected and he'll need money on which to survive, let your lawyer do the talking for you. The one other claim that you linked (where a clerk gave him brake fluid instead of power steering fluid) does not constitute "a lot of 'mistakes'".

about a year and a half ago
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Computer Repair Company Takes Revenge on Devious Customer

InfiniteBlaze Ouch. (3 comments)

You don't seem to have much of a defense. There are no "telltale signs" of setting up a RAID. It's either set in the BIOS or set in the RAID controller's BIOS. Also, it's pretty easy to determine the integrity of the data - a simple hard drive test can tell if the drive is failing, and any live CD is acceptable for determining if the files still exist or not. Seems like a case of technical incompetence, IMO. Nice style on the website though.

about a year and a half ago
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Particle Physicists Confirm Arrow of Time Using B Meson Measurements

InfiniteBlaze Re:Time (259 comments)

Time flies like an arrow. Fruit flies like a banana. That's all I've got to contribute. Carry on.

Fruit flies poorly without wings or an outside force acting upon it.

about 2 years ago

Submissions

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Android Security Flaw Erases All Data

InfiniteBlaze InfiniteBlaze writes  |  about 2 years ago

InfiniteBlaze (2564509) writes "From the article:

"A major security flaw that causes all of the data stored on an Android smartphone to be erased has been discovered and samsung devices seem to be the target.

Technical University Berlin's Ravi Borgaonkar said websites have tricked Android owners into activating malicious code by selecting on-screen phone numbers.

He added that no Android device could tell the difference between real phone numbers to USSD codes recognized by smartphones as a set of instructions to erase the data from its memory card.

A proportion of the malware seems to only target Samsung devices. Once the malware triggers a factory reset, there was no method of restoring the data, he added.""

Link to Original Source
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Microsoft being anticompetitive?

InfiniteBlaze InfiniteBlaze writes  |  more than 2 years ago

InfiniteBlaze (2564509) writes "I know most Slashdotters prefer alternative browsers, but for a number of reasons, I use a combination of Chrome and IE. I've noticed that over the past few months, Microsoft has made it harder and harder to add Google as the primary search engine for IE. Each new iteration of the gallery has buried the legitimate Google option deeper and deeper. Now, searching explicitly for the word "google" on the Gallery doesn't even return the valid entry in the first five results. What gives? Has anyone else noticed this?"
Link to Original Source

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