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Linux 3.14 Kernel Released

Ioldanach Oblig car analogy (132 comments)

You guys keep working on that. Meanwhile Apple will continue selling millions more Macbooks and Mac Pro's to hard core developers, scientists and engineers who have work to do and need a computer to get it done with.

  • Apple: sportscar; moves you around quick and looks good while you do it. Useful for a lot of personal tasks.
  • Windows: suv; a bit bloated and gas guzzling but reliable for basic user-level grunt work.
  • Linux: truck; From tractor-trailer on down to pickup truck, great at heavy lifting but it has to be fairly stripped down (e.g., android) in order to do useful user-level work. Most people wouldn't use the heavy versions of it, but for those of us who need it, it is indispensable.

about three weeks ago
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Linux 3.14 Kernel Released

Ioldanach Re:WOW! (132 comments)

Also, my Macbook Pro is 7 years old and looks like new.

So?

And here we have the crux of the Mac v. Linux argument.

about three weeks ago
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Homeopathic Remedies Recalled For Containing Real Medicine

Ioldanach Re:Homeopathic principles (173 comments)

So we might ask why they labelled it "homeopathic" when it has such a high fraction of active ingredient. Our guess is "marketing": The company that packages it wants to sell to the not-insignificant fraction of the population that believes in homeopathic cures. The doctors probably just grin, knowing that it's meaningless, but also knowing that a good number of traditional "folk" remedies are actually useful, as long as the problem is minor and precisely-measured medicine isn't required.

A "medicine" marked "homeopathic" is technically regulated by the FDA, but isn't tested for safety or effectiveness.

about three weeks ago
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Homeopathic Remedies Recalled For Containing Real Medicine

Ioldanach Re:Homeopathic principles (173 comments)

If they aren't diluted, they aren't homeopathic. Holistic, maybe.

Why don't you simply google for homeopathic medicals and check yourself?

I'm well aware of the theoretical basis of homeopathic medicine, but even so I already refreshed my memory with google and a few sites both supporting and debunking it. I even included a link to wikipedia in my original. If you want to dispute my claim, provide a citation and not a "google it yourself" response.

Homeopathy is based on the idea that a substance that causes the symptoms in normal quantities cures the symptoms in smaller quantities. Hence the dilution.

Oscillococcinum, one of the most common of these quack remedies, typically comes in 200C dilution. A C dilution is a 1/100th dilution, so 200C is 1/(100^200) dilution rate.

Then it is not a "homeopathic" medical but nonsense.

Quite a lot of homeopathic products use the C dilutions, in surprisingly high numbers. Of course, there are also a number of products that use small numbers of X (1/10th) dilutions as well. The 3X-6X dilutions do result in a product that contains the active ingredient. Of course, if I started with a 1g sample of a drug, say, tacrolimus, and performed a 3X dilution on it, I'd end up with a 1mg product. This isn't homeopathy, because that is well with in the dose-response curve for that drug and the drug at that level produces a direct and specific response in line with its properties.

about three weeks ago
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Homeopathic Remedies Recalled For Containing Real Medicine

Ioldanach Re:Homeopathic principles (173 comments)

That is wrong.

First off all plenty of homeopathic medicals are not diluted at all.

If they aren't diluted, they aren't homeopathic. Holistic, maybe.

Those that get diluted get repeatedly diluted by a factor of TEN not HUNDRED.

And this is NOT repeated 100 times, the maximum AFAIK is 23.

Oscillococcinum, one of the most common of these quack remedies, typically comes in 200C dilution. A C dilution is a 1/100th dilution, so 200C is 1/(100^200) dilution rate.

about three weeks ago
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AT&T Exec Calls Netflix "Arrogant" For Expecting Net Neutrality

Ioldanach Re:So what am I paying for? (466 comments)

What exactly does my cable bill give me then, if not access to services on the web?

It gives you access to services on the web, but they have to pay their connectivity bill, too. If the company they chose doesn't have a good connection to your company, though, then your experience with that company will suffer.

In Netflix's case, they chose Cogent, and Cogent wants to take advantage of peering arrangements that presume data will cross their links to other providers in both directions equally, but they want to send far more data than they receive. But they don't want to pay the transit fees that would normally incur.

about a month ago
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AT&T Exec Calls Netflix "Arrogant" For Expecting Net Neutrality

Ioldanach Re:Not how it works? (466 comments)

"But it's not how the Internet, or telecommunication for that matter, has ever worked,' Hasn't that how the internet has been? If someone calls me to play a song they wrote over the phone should they pay a fee to provide me that entertainment over the phone?

They had to pay for their phone connection and you had to pay for yours. (We'll ignore the possibility of long distance charges.) If they went with a cut rate provider, though, their end might be choppy and not provide you with quality entertainment.

about a month ago
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AT&T Exec Calls Netflix "Arrogant" For Expecting Net Neutrality

Ioldanach Re:It's not arrogant, it's correct. (466 comments)

Put another way:

* Netflix pays for their bandwidth * Customers pay for their bandwidth

And yet, AT&T wants more money because they think they have the right to charge Netflix more to pass through their tollbooth.

In a typical peering arrangement, both sides of the link pass roughly equal amounts of data to the other side. Netflix, however, gives Cogent so much data that the peering links are lop sided. Cogent delivers a lot of content, and receives very little. In such an unbalanced situation, the side with more data to serve typically pays a transit fee for the use of the other network.

Cogent doesn't want to pay the transit fee. If they had to pay the transit fee, they'd have to pass that along to Netflix, and Netflix would have to raise the rates they charge their subscribers.

about a month ago
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California Bill Proposes Mandatory Kill-Switch On Phones and Tablets

Ioldanach Re:What could go wrong? (341 comments)

Actually, they don't need a kill switch for the phones to do this--there are a lot fewer devices to shut off if you simply shutdown the cell-towers in the area to cutoff communication.

But those devices don't render any video recordings you may have made inaccessible.

about 2 months ago
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Chinese Icebreaker Is Stuck In Ice After Antarctic Research Vessel Rescue

Ioldanach Re:It's still there? (361 comments)

I'd still like to see a citation.

I can't find his actual quote offhand, reported in original context. I can find, however, that he was apparently citing Zwally, as also cited by National Geographic. Ggiven that it is going down by steps and not in a continuous flow, however, I think the real year that the arctic will be free of ice in the summer will happen sometime between next year and 2040 (one of the more realistic original estimates), but we can't really be sure which year it'll be. It'll also be interesting to see what the impact of the new solar cycle will be.

about 4 months ago
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Man In Tesla Model S Fire Explains What Happened

Ioldanach Re:They should upgrade the warning ... (526 comments)

He's lucky the plasma conduit behind the steering wheel didn't explode in his face. Probably because he wasn't wearing a red shirt.

about 5 months ago
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International Space Station Infected With Malware Carried By Russian Astronauts

Ioldanach Re:Oh, the irony... (226 comments)

The ISS is nothing more than a thinly veiled weapons platform cloaked as a space station. Rods from God is the ultimate weapon, inflicting nuclear scale devastation without the pesky fallout. Within our lifetimes expect to see an attack launched and the USA will claim that they had no part in it, when in reality they will be the instigating party with plausible deniability.

Why would the Rods from God project require a manned platform? Especially an international crew that would be likely to discover the device and report it back to their own respective countries?

about 5 months ago
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Atlanta Man Shatters Coast-to-Coast Driving Record, Averaging 98MPH

Ioldanach Re: "Driving like a fool" (666 comments)

Not exactly the kind of "fool" you hear of on those Dumb Crook News segments in the media

Except for the segments where the Dumb Crook was found out because he admitted his crime.

about 6 months ago
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Nebraska Scientists Refuse To Carry Out Climate Change-Denying Study

Ioldanach Do the study, with unintended consequences (640 comments)

Since the language of the law (page 3) requires the task force to plan for "unintended consequences of climate adaptation and mitigation," the study should be completed as requested, and the effect of human activity against the baseline ebb and flow of regional climate should be included on the chart as an "unintended consequence."

about 6 months ago
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Facebook Isn't Accepting New Posts, Likes, Comments...

Ioldanach Re:works fine for me (258 comments)

MY MONITAR WIL NOT TURN ON!!11!!

Please make sure the power cable is plugged in.

IS TO DARK T0O SEE WHAT I'M DOING THE POWR IS OUT.

about 6 months ago
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Books With "Questionable Content" Being Deleted From ebookstores In Sweeping Ban

Ioldanach Re:And people ask me why I do not like eBook (548 comments)

Well, not that i am into erotica, but I dislike being told what I am being allowed to read by private company.

You're not. A private company is deciding which products it wishes to sell and which it does not.

The problem with eBooks, though, is that in most implementations they can reach in and retroactively remove the books you've purchased. So even if they chose to sell a book and you chose to buy it, they can choose to un-sell the book to you if they decide the content is a problem for them.

about 6 months ago
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Students Hack School-Issued iPads Within One Week

Ioldanach Re:Just proxy it out at the router. (375 comments)

No doubt part of the deal to get parents to accept them was that they would also be locked down at home. Of course, parents could just lock down their network at home too, but how many of them are going to get off their asses and do that when they can just bitch at the school to do the parenting for them instead?

What if the parents didn't agree to the deal? What if parents thought that the school's predetermined whitelist was too much? Or too little? Maybe the parents were parenting, and decided that their kids should have more rights than the school would like them to have.

about 7 months ago
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Students Hack School-Issued iPads Within One Week

Ioldanach Re:Just proxy it out at the router. (375 comments)

Block vpn at proxy level.

Open only certain ports, that what students really need, like port 80 for www. They may even consider a whitelist of sites students can visit from the school network.

You can proxy over standard https port 443, so blocking proxying is mostly a dead end. You'd have to stick with the whitelist.

about 7 months ago
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Court Declares Google Must Face Wiretap Charges For Wi-Fi Snooping

Ioldanach Re:Good. (214 comments)

Yeah how about trying "We were ordered to do it by the US government and we can't give you details because a) national security and b) gag order". Seems to work for the government, why can't it work for Google?

Because the government will be able to declare in court that they didn't do it, and Google won't have proof that they did?

That's covered, because the gag order gags itself, so you can't show it to the court.

about 7 months ago

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