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Comments

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Favorite "Go!" Phrase?

JThaddeus Get ready (701 comments)

Get ready.
Outboard personnel, stand up.
Inboard personal, stand up.
Hook up.
Check static lines.
Check equipment.
Sound off for equipment check.
Stand in the door.
Go!

Since my day, the Army has changed "Stand in the door" to "Stand by." The former had meaning for C-130s, but not C-141s and helicopters.

3 days ago
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Study Shows Agent Orange Still Taints Aging C-123s

JThaddeus Maybe I have a claim (166 comments)

I'll have to check my jump log.

about 5 months ago
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Telegraph Contributor Says Coding Is For Exceptionally Dull Weirdos

JThaddeus Hey! (453 comments)

I resemble that!

about 9 months ago
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Dick Cheney Had Implanted Defibrillator Altered To Prevent Terrorist Attack

JThaddeus New Heart Device Allows Cheney To Experience Love (242 comments)

One of my favorite headlines fromThe Onion:
http://www.theonion.com/articles/new-heart-device-allows-cheney-to-experience-love,2294/

about 9 months ago
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Never Underestimate the Bandwidth of a Suburban Filled With MicroSD Cards

JThaddeus Think of one 8GB thumbdrive... (208 comments)

...and a play ticket to Hong Kong (with transfer to Moscow).

about 10 months ago
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What Marketers Think They Know About You and What They Really Do

JThaddeus Couldn't find me (277 comments)

Huh? They can't find anything with data provided. I don't think these guys are gonna challenge Google or win many NSA contracts.

about a year ago
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Feds Seek Prison For Man Who Taught How To Beat a Polygraph

JThaddeus Selectively administered (374 comments)

Polygraphs are one reason I left classified work for greener pastures. I believe they are nearly worthless, used just as much to harass as anything else.

In my last classified job, my employer hired a new security officer. After several months on the job she was sent for her polygraph. She returned the same day, the test unadministered because she had a heart problem. The problem was manageable, but it made it impossible for an "accurate" test. Despite this she remained in her job. With access to far more material than myself and others--sensitive material covering many programs--she was excused. Obviously the intelligence community doesn't believe in polygraphs either. I'm glad to be out of that world.

about a year ago
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Feds Seek Prison For Man Who Taught How To Beat a Polygraph

JThaddeus Witchcraft (374 comments)

"Polygraph tests are 20th-century witchcraft." --Senator Sam Ervin

about a year ago
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Microsoft Has 1 Million Servers. So What?

JThaddeus server comparison (BSD vs Micro$loth) (172 comments)

I attended the first ApacheCon in 1998. One of the top brass at Yahoo (founder? CEO?) spoke on open source software. I don't recall all the details, but I remember him saying that they had about 450 servers running BSD.

During the Q&A, someone asked what version of BSD they were running. As I recall he said that over half were running the latest, another 30% or so were on one version earlier, and the rest--15-20%--were on an older version. This caused a mummer from the audience, and an ASF panelist asked for elaboration.

Oh, replied they Yahooligan, why the old OS? Well it doesn't seem to make much sense to reboot a server that's run for over 18 months without a problem just to upgrade the OS.

At this point the president of the ASF, Brian Behlendorf, stepped to the mic and said, "Let's hear Microsoft say that ."

The crowd went wild (except for the two MS reps in front of me).

1 year,9 days
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What's Going On In KDE Plasma Workspaces 2?

JThaddeus Fix Akonadi, Nepomuk, etc. (122 comments)

Lord, how I miss KDE3. It worked, simply worked. It didn't lock up. When my Linux box was running KDE3, I don't recall ever having to telnet in to restart a frozen machine. It happens all too often with KDE4. And KDE4 ruined, utterly ruined, KMail, once the best email program I ever used. KDE4's efforts at a "semantic desktop" and a "personal information manager" rendered over a dozen years of email archives unsearchable by anything but find and grep. Restarting, clean-up and reinstalling, etc. never worked. Hello, Thunderbird. You ain't all that great, but at least you let me search old emails. Farewell, KDE. Farewell SUSE. Farewell, Linux. My personal workstation has been Linux since 2000, but it looks like you've driven me back to my first love, the Macintosh.

about a year ago
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Ask Slashdot: Current State of Linux Email Clients?

JThaddeus Re:Thunderbird works (464 comments)

KMail was always my favorite but the axis of evil that is Akonadi, Nepomuk, and Strigi have ruined it. Not long ago indexing just shut down rendering twelve years of KMail archives about as searchable as the spiral notebooks on my shelf. And that was a good day. On a bad day some filter kicked in and removed the message body from all incoming emails.

No amount of Google searching, no amount of reloading and resetting, no amount question on the KDE boards helped. Indexing might start, but it always froze

Screw KDE. I switched to Thunderbird, finding a Python script that moved all my mail archives from maildir to mbox. I hated to give up maildir, but at least now my email is usable.

about a year and a half ago
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Ask Slashdot: Which OSS Database Project To Help?

JThaddeus Re:MySQL, PostgreSQL not the only options (287 comments)

I'll second the various recommendations for Firebird.

About 10 years ago our senior engineer asked me to look into open source database systems as a back end for our product. The idea was to target customers who didn't want or couldn't afford Oracle, Sybase, etc. MySQL was out since it can't be use commercially without fee. PostgreSQL (at that time) lacked a robust transaction management system. Firebird was in its infancy, still known as Borland's Interbase, but it was fully open source and had the transaction management chops I needed.

In just a few weeks I had ported over 13K lines of Oracle embedded SQL to Firebird|Interbase. It worked very well, and was easy to install. It's speed, simplicity, and reliability quickly made it our go-to database for inhouse use. When Macintosh went Intel and db vendors stopped supporting Mac, we began using Firebird commercially. It's a champ.

about a year and a half ago
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Proposed Posting of Clients List In Prostitution Case Raises Privacy Concerns

JThaddeus Public record (533 comments)

Unless they involve minors, misdemeanor charges--DUI, shoplifting, simple assault, etc--are matter of public record. Why should these charges be an exception?

about 2 years ago
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Bill Moggridge, GRiD Compass Designer, Dies

JThaddeus The first computer I ever used (29 comments)

I fell into CS by accident. My first job out of the Army was to perform analysis and studies for the Joint Chiefs of Staff. But the Army Reserves misplaced my file and could not confirm my clearances. While I was being recleared, to keep me off overhead I was put on a project that was developing computer systems for tactical units. In November 1982 I was given one of the first GiRDs and told to "think of how you would use this if you were back in the infantry." Shortly after that I was learning SQL and Pascal. So long ago...

about 2 years ago
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Amazon Debuts Kindle Paperwhite, Kindle Fire HD In 2 Sizes

JThaddeus All this technology... (307 comments)

...and computing sales tax on a state-by-state business is too difficult for them. Bah!

about 2 years ago
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Free Desktop Software Development Dead In Windows 8

JThaddeus Ha! (462 comments)

I Gnu it.

more than 2 years ago
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Amazon Patents Annotating Books, Digital Works

JThaddeus There is prior art that is decades old (125 comments)

There is nothing new about annotating electronic documents. This has been a part of document management systems for decades. I've been at this company (http://www.mindwrap.com/) for over 15 years. It's been part and parcel of our product since before I arrived. Before that, in 1993, I worked on a FileNet document management system installation. FileNet already had an annotation capability for Windows clients. I wrote a Macintosh implementation for the project.

more than 2 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: Making JavaScript Tolerable For a Dyed-in-the-Wool C/C++/Java Guy?

JThaddeus Re:GWT (575 comments)

I second this. I've been using the Google Web Toolkit (GWT, http://code.google.com/webtoolkit/) for about 5 years now with good results. Write in Java, compile to Javascript, and let GWT handle the browser differences. The source is all there if you want to see how their Javascript works, and you can insert you're own Javascript code when and where you want it. Finally, the user's group has been an excellent source of advice.

more than 2 years ago
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Symantec Sued For Running Fake "Scareware" Scans

JThaddeus Is this legally provable? (391 comments)

I'm wondering if this charge is legally provable. I would think the complainant would have to do some reverse engineering of Symantec's software and reverse engineering is most likely forbidden by Symantec's EULA. Without this, how can it be proven what Symantec did or did not find on the computer? Even then, does anyone think it can be made understandable to a judge or 12 jurors?

more than 2 years ago

Submissions

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The JavaScript juggernaut rolls on

JThaddeus JThaddeus writes  |  about 6 months ago

JThaddeus (531998) writes "An article in TechWorld Australia summarizes the latest opinions on JavaScript from ThoughtWorks: "There is no end in sight to the rise of JavaScript... 'I think JavaScript has been seen as a serious language for the last two or three years; I think now increasingly we’re seeing JavaScript as a platform,' said Sam Newman, ThoughtWorks’ Global Innovation Lead." The article touches on new additions to JavaScript tools, techniques, and languages built on Javascript. As the fuller report (PDF) says, "The ecosystem around JavaScript as a serious application platform continues to evolve. Many interesting new tools for testing, building, and managing dependencies in both server- and client-side JavaScript applications have emerged recently.""
Link to Original Source
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Starbucks Phone App Stores Password Unencrypted

JThaddeus JThaddeus writes  |  about 6 months ago

JThaddeus (531998) writes "The Daily Caller reports a serious security flaw in the Starbucks phone app: "Starbucks confirmed late Tuesday that anyone could access the unencrypted data stored on the official Starbucks app simply by connecting the phone to a computer – bypassing lock screen or PIN security features with no hacking or jailbreaking necessary." The linked report is for iOS. No mention of Android, but do you think it is any different?"
Link to Original Source
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Frog Sacrificed to LADEE Launch

JThaddeus JThaddeus writes  |  about 10 months ago

JThaddeus (531998) writes "One of the close-up cameras watching the LADEE launch caught the image of another frog sacrificed to science, and in a far more spectacular way than in your high school biology class: "... a new picture which has been released by NASA of the LADEE launch also featured an intruder a small frog which unfortunately was at a wrong place. The picture of the amphibian seen clearly silhouetted against the Minotaur 5 rocket smoke is not a fake and this has been confirmed by NASA." Follow this link to see the photo."
Link to Original Source
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The Balkanization of Chatting

JThaddeus JThaddeus writes  |  about a year ago

JThaddeus (531998) writes "Slashdot's own (or former) CmdrTaco has a posting on the Washington Post's website where he discusses how chat apps have overtaken SMS. Yeah, they are cheap. There's no telecom fee per message or for some number of messages per month. However "The problem of course is that these systems are annoyingly incompatible with each other. My phone can buzz with chat notifications from 3 different apps at any moment. My desktop has even more scattered across browser tabs and standalone apps." Ditto, nor do I want to hassle learning some app or trying to understand its who's-listening settings. I'll stick to email and to occasional SMS."
Link to Original Source
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Engineers are cold and dead inside

JThaddeus JThaddeus writes  |  about a year and a half ago

JThaddeus writes "From The Register comes a report on a study by Swedish researches claiming "that people who go into engineering are less caring and empathetic than those who enter professions such as medicine." The study claims to account for the fact that women--who are assumed to be more empathetic--enter medicine at a great rate than enter engineering."
Link to Original Source
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Declining Life Expectancy for Less Educated Whites

JThaddeus JThaddeus writes  |  about a year and a half ago

JThaddeus writes "Citing mortality data, researchers assert that the life expectancy of less educated U.S. whites is declining. According to the New York Time article, "Four studies in recent years identified modest declines, but a new one that looks separately at Americans lacking a high school diploma found disturbingly sharp drops in life expectancy for whites in this group...The reasons for the decline remain unclear, but researchers offered possible explanations, including a spike in prescription drug overdoses among young whites, higher rates of smoking among less educated white women, rising obesity, and a steady increase in the number of the least educated Americans who lack health insurance." Could the Cracker problem be self-correcting?"
Link to Original Source
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The Shatner Comma

JThaddeus JThaddeus writes  |  about 2 years ago

JThaddeus writes "The Los Angeles Times reports on a Twitter kerfuffle "that made it seem like Oxford University Press was dropping the use of its eponymous comma." The report was erroneous. Of interest to Slashdot-ters is the L.A.Times writer's suggestion that style guides include "the Shatner comma." I, bet, you, can, guess, how, the, Shatner, comma, is, used."
Link to Original Source
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Lawsuit Claims AT&T Overbills on Data Plans

JThaddeus JThaddeus writes  |  more than 3 years ago

JThaddeus (531998) writes "A complaint filed in federal court in California alleges that 'AT&T has "systematically" overcharged iPhone and iPad owners with capped data plans by inflating the amount of data they download and adding "phantom traffic," a lawsuit claimed last week.' The plaintiff's attorney is asking the judge to grant the lawsuit class-action status for all iPhone and iPad users on capped data plans. 'AT&T said it would "vigorously" fight the suit.'"
Link to Original Source
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Scientists Identify Head of France's King Henry IV

JThaddeus JThaddeus writes  |  more than 3 years ago

JThaddeus (531998) writes "The Associated Press reports that "After nine months of tests, researchers in France have identified the head of France's King Henry IV". Henry was assassinated in 1610, and his head has been missing his body was dug up and decapitated during the French Revolution. Researchers found features similar to those in royal portraits, and radiocarbon dating confirms that the head dates to the 17th Century. Interestingly, "Perfumers on the team used their professionally trained noses to identify specific embalming substances in the mouth used to hide nasty odors." The results have been published an online medical journal."
Link to Original Source
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Your brain on GPS

JThaddeus JThaddeus writes  |  more than 4 years ago

JThaddeus (531998) writes "Do you think you're good with directions? Do you never get lost? Or are you directionally challenged? If you are among the growing numbers that rely on GPS to get around, maybe you want to rethink that. From the article:

"The increase in GPS use also has meant that people spend less time learning details about where they are at any moment. British researchers have found that drivers using GPS formed less detailed and accurate cognitive maps of their routes than drivers who use paper maps. Similarly, a University of Tokyo study found that pedestrians using GPS-enabled cell phones had a harder time figuring out where they were and where they had come from.""

Link to Original Source
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Yahoo! Begins Tailored Advertising

JThaddeus JThaddeus writes  |  about 7 years ago

JThaddeus writes "The Washington Post (free registration) reports that "Yahoo yesterday launched a system to let marketers tailor advertising content to individual users, theoretically making the ads more effective and, therefore, more lucrative for Yahoo... Yahoo's advertising service, SmartAds, uses behavioral, demographic and geographic information to try to connect people with marketing that caters to their interests. Yahoo said it is its largest effort to cull information about its users.""

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