Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

New York State Releases Sex Offender Facebook App

JackOfAllGeeks Re:Scarlet Letter (252 comments)

Because there's a reason people become sex offenders.

Yeah, we have to remember that these are the sort of people that molest children and rape young women. Or, you know, send sexting messages in middle school, sleep with their high school girlfriend, or get plastered and take a piss in an alley. "Sex Offender" has become so dilute as to be almost entirely useless.

more than 2 years ago
top

Are You Prepared For the Zombie Apocalypse?

JackOfAllGeeks Re:I do think about this time to time (515 comments)

This is what I don't get -- zombies are dead already, so what good are tiny pieces of metal at high velocity? They don't need to breath, they don't care about blood loss or "vital" organs... Unless your bullets can explode their heads, I think you need a new plan.

more than 2 years ago
top

Are You Prepared For the Zombie Apocalypse?

JackOfAllGeeks Re:Easy (515 comments)

Outsmarting the zombies has never been the problem. How long can you run for? How many bullets do you have? How long can you keep swinging that crowbar? That they're individually stupid is irrelevant; it's their relentless march and unending numbers that are the problem. You need food. You need sleep. You will run out of ammo.

more than 2 years ago
top

Verizon Wireless Changes Privacy Policy

JackOfAllGeeks Re:Opt out (204 comments)

This is precisely why I'm not outraged. Verizon sent me a note about the change and made opting out almost trivial. And I could opt-out all the phones on my account at the same time.

more than 2 years ago
top

Security Expert Slams Google+ Pseudonym Policy

JackOfAllGeeks Re:Other way round (373 comments)

I'm pretty sure I remember hearing that there's an 87% chance that your gender+birthdate+postalcode is unique... So, yeah, knowing your postalcode and birthdate gets you a lot without knowing your name.

more than 3 years ago
top

DNA samples should be on record for...

JackOfAllGeeks Re:Not saying I don't care...but... (316 comments)

I think it depends on the specific serious crime. Intuitively, it seems to me that serial raping is more likely than serial killing (normalizing the relative frequency of both types of events).

That may well be true, but my point was that a one-time rapist is far more likely than a serial-rapist, or a one-time murderer is far more likely than a serial-murderer, rather than that different crimes have any relation to each other. Petty crimes might have a higher rate of repeat offense, but do we really need a DNA database for those?

more than 3 years ago
top

DNA samples should be on record for...

JackOfAllGeeks Re:Not saying I don't care...but... (316 comments)

The problem with collection on an as-required basis is...

IMHO the best option is to allow police to take DNA samples of people they can show reasonable suspicion of.

I guess you have a different definition of "as needed" than I do. These sound the same to me, and any definition of "needed" that doesn't include "can show reasonable suspicion" is problematic, I think.

To be fair, though, even in the case you presented...

if the police ask for your DNA and you refuse you instantly become a suspect

... do you mean to tell me you weren't already a suspect when they asked before you refused? Do you expect that the police will just swab the whole metropolitan area whenever any crime is committed? If they have no reason to believe you were involved why would they swab you, and if they think you might have been involved how is that different from being a suspect?

more than 3 years ago
top

DNA samples should be on record for...

JackOfAllGeeks Re:Not saying I don't care...but... (316 comments)

Except that when that laws gets passed around in congress, "rape" will be transformed to "convicted sex offender", which currently means a whole lot of people who really don't belong in that category, unfortunately. Examples abound of minors doing perfectly normal minorly-things and ending up labelled as a sex offenders for life.

This.

Also, why do we need a record? That's only useful if you believe they'll be a repeat offender, and anecdotally it seems like most serious crimes are one-off incidents. I think DNA evidence can be useful in many situations, but why can't that be collected on an as-needed basis? That avoids this whole issue.

more than 3 years ago
top

How Do People Respond To Being Touched By a Robot?

JackOfAllGeeks Re:Human touch is seen as empathetic (137 comments)

If it looks like a big-ass toy instead of a doll there's no conflict, and you will be able to attach to it emotionally as you can with dogs/cats/other animals.

more than 3 years ago
top

How Do People Respond To Being Touched By a Robot?

JackOfAllGeeks Re:How about robot as agent for compassion? (137 comments)

I bet your girlfriend wouldn't like receiving a love letter that you had bought from "Love Letters Unlimited" and just inserted her name into, would she?

This is why the greeting card industry has been such a failure.

more than 3 years ago
top

How Do People Respond To Being Touched By a Robot?

JackOfAllGeeks Re:Human touch is seen as empathetic (137 comments)

Humans anthropomorphize *everything*.

This.

My brother attributes a personality and identity to his iPod, I'm sure people will be able to empathize with a robot. The fact that the robot doesn't empathize back is irrelevant -- even in human-to-human interactions, my perception of your intent is far more important than your actual intent, which is recognized in the original comment:

Even if we know it's disingenuous, or that it's part of a person's job, there is still something in the back of our minds that responds to it as a genuine human connection.

more than 3 years ago
top

Can You Beat a Computer At Rock-Paper-Scissors?

JackOfAllGeeks Re:I can beat the computer... (292 comments)

Why not? Because that was the premise. If you want to introduce dice to "ensure" randomness that's fine, but it wasn't really the question at hand. And then people will start questioning whether you are playing the game/beating the computer.

more than 3 years ago
top

Ask Slashdot: Privacy Paranoia

JackOfAllGeeks Re:Use aliases. (323 comments)

But it's never a specific rejection letter - it's always a simple mass-mailing to everyone who applied and failed. Even if you went to an interview, they won't say why you're being rejected, just that you are.

So you have no reason to believe you were rejected based on anything you said or did, only that you didn't get the job. A job is a very nice thing to have -- one might argue necessary -- but I'm not going to self-censor before I see evidence that people are losing their livelihoods based on "remotely political" comments they've made, if then.

more than 3 years ago
top

Ask Slashdot: Privacy Paranoia

JackOfAllGeeks Re:Use aliases. (323 comments)

It isn't advisible to say anything at all under your real name any more, not when everything is archived and googleable. There is nothing you can say on any issue remotely political without the risk of upsetting someone, and that someone may be your now-or-future co-worker or boss.

If you have such frail conviction in your own beliefs and values... I believe what I believe regardless of what someone else thinks of it, and if my boss would fire me over it then I probably wouldn't be happy working there any ways. If it gets to the point that I can't find any job because of my opinions, then there are bigger problems in the world.

more than 3 years ago
top

Can You Beat a Computer At Rock-Paper-Scissors?

JackOfAllGeeks Re:I can beat the computer... (292 comments)

Truly random play has the same expected results against every single strategy.Think about it this way: no matter what the computer thinks you will do, if you play truly randomly, its odds of winning, losing or tying are all 1/3. If it did any better, it would be able to predict randomness, which is by definition impossible, and if it did any worse, then by inverting its strategy it would do better, and the same reasoning holds.

That makes sense, but it supposes that someone is playing randomly. If the premise is that humans can't play randomly, then you don't have "random vs strategy," you have pseudo-random vs pseudo-random, and it's possible/probable that the computer's choices are skewed. Which is kind of what you said in the second paragraph (and what I said above, if maybe not as elegantly as you).

more than 3 years ago
top

Can You Beat a Computer At Rock-Paper-Scissors?

JackOfAllGeeks Re:I can beat the computer... (292 comments)

Purely by chance these numbers should be the same.

That's probably the key -- although you might be close-to-random, the computer is using some kind of prediction algorithm which *isn't* random, so it's choices are going to be skewed based on previous experience.

more than 3 years ago
top

Can You Beat a Computer At Rock-Paper-Scissors?

JackOfAllGeeks Re:I can beat the computer... (292 comments)

Strictly speaking, I'm not sure it's possible for a human to "choose randomly," but maybe I'm over-thinking the phrase... And it's probably insignificant in practical terms, since "random" and "based on sufficiently-unknown processes" are probably close enough for most purposes.

more than 3 years ago
top

Wikipedia Moves To Delete the Free Speech Flag

JackOfAllGeeks Re:5 fucking color stripes in a square. (258 comments)

No, but the flag is a "derivative work" of the number: if the number can be protected by copyright then the creator of the flag needed a licence from the owner of the number's copyright.

That's disputable. The original "work" is just a handful of hex digits. The flag is a picture. You might argue that the flag was "inspired by" the key, but even at that they key doesn't exist anywhere in the flag itself -- at a bit level, it looks drastically different than the key. Only the author's intent indicates any relationship at all with the key.

more than 3 years ago

Submissions

JackOfAllGeeks hasn't submitted any stories.

Journals

JackOfAllGeeks has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>