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The Physics of Why Cold Fusion Isn't Real

Jason Goatcher Re:Why Cold Fusion (or something like it) Is Real (335 comments)

It's not so much a natural law as the fact that palladium especially tends to soak up hydrogen. People, including, apparently, some scientists, seem to ignore that there's a lot of chemical energy in hydrogen, and so keep falling for cold fusion. Pretty much every cold fusion experiment has eventually been shown to involve palladium's natural sponginess towards hydrogen to act as a natural chemical battery, if you will.

Ahhhh, so you're saying we'd be better off studying a palladium/hydrogen battery idea? Sounds promising if this is where all the enthusiasm is accidentally coming from.

yesterday
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The Physics of Why Cold Fusion Isn't Real

Jason Goatcher Re:Why Cold Fusion (or something like it) Is Real (335 comments)

It's possible there are as yet unknown natural laws. It's even possible that there are natural laws our species is just too dumb to discover, ever. But the chance of undiscoverable laws is lower than the more general chance of as yet undiscovered laws.

            In the same way, the chance that there's an as yet undiscovered law which applies to this particular technology, and which has certain properties making it at all likely it gets inadvertently followed sometimes is possible, but is an accumulation of low probablility circumstances, and so has very low overall likelyhood. It's generally more likely that any undicovered laws will be ones where they consistently block getting the technological configuration right. For a simplified example, if there's some undiscovered property of, say, Tungsten, then it's likely to become apparent when people note that all the claims for success come from experiments where tungsten was used for a particular stage of the process in a particular way. There's much less chance that simply having a certain mass of Tungsten within a certain number of feet of the device, whether it's made into a part of the apparatus or light bulb filaments, will make the experiment very likely to succeed in either case.

        Try to describe a hypothetical law that works in such a way it is very hard to spot a pattern or regularity that will lead the researchers to really formally formulating that law, but makes a big enough difference that it determines general success or failure much more than many other variables. Try to craft such a genuinely new law for explaining anything, from apiary colony collapse disorder to zebra camoflage evolution*. I'll bet this results in a very long, convoluted law to explain all the conditions. That's what usually happens with novel approaches - sure every once in a while one pays off big time, but not every discovery is Special Relativity. If you end up with a long formulation, full of various clauses which make it fit all the observations, then what you have is a chain of things, and if any link of that chain is wrong, the whole formulation collapses. If a chain is really only as strong as its weakest link, then a very lengthy chain of logical inferences is a chain with a very low probability of being right.

* why do Zebras have stripes when one of their predators in roughly the same size range has polka-dots (Leopards)?, and another one even closer to Zebras in size is solidly colored (Lions)? Try to develop a new law relating to natural selection that rules out any possibilitys that this is simply happenstance, and yet that doesn't predict what sorts of camoflage any other species should display in case some of the facts don't fit that case.

Wow, you're what I wanted to be before I gave up on college because of schizophrenia. Unless I'm totally wrong about you going to college, what is, or was, your major?

yesterday
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The Physics of Why Cold Fusion Isn't Real

Jason Goatcher Re:Why Cold Fusion (or something like it) Is Real (335 comments)

A paper based on discredited experiments is not valid science.

There is no conspiracy in science. Facts rule. The fact is cold fusion is myth that needs to die. You cannot over come the columb barrier without sufficient energy. Fusion is an inherently thermal process.

I haven't studied cold fusion in much depth, but if I were to look into this I'd probably use more of a forensics type of approach than a scientific method type of approach.

It's entirely possible that there's a natural law that scientists are unaware of and are randomly following and not following when they try to duplicate the experiment.

2 days ago
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Saturn's 'Death Star' Moon May Hide Subsurface Ocean

Jason Goatcher Re:The quesiton that interests me (48 comments)

I know this is a troll, but you don't need Jesus if you don't have religion in the first place. It's only when you have to ability to gain knowledge and use it that things get all weird.

3 days ago
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Saturn's 'Death Star' Moon May Hide Subsurface Ocean

Jason Goatcher Re:That's No Moon (48 comments)

It's transportation to other solar systems and the means to duplicate it. There's no Prime Directive, if you can get to the space station and get it up and running then BOOM, you're a galactic citizen with all that that entails.

And you even get a free ride back to Earth.

And, yes, I'm totally joking.

3 days ago
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How Nigeria Stopped Ebola

Jason Goatcher Re:US,Nigeria (378 comments)

If the US has an Ebola epedemic, it'll probably be because of people fighting for their "civil rights."

Not saying I'm against civil rights, I personally hate the Patriot Act and what the NSA has become, but sometimes you just have to live by the golden rule. In this case, that means turn yourself in for testing and possible isolation if you think you might have Ebola.

3 days ago
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Who's In Charge During the Ebola Crisis?

Jason Goatcher It's okay... (279 comments)

People haven't taken the constitution seriously in years, why on earth would they start during an Ebola epedemic?

5 days ago
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Netflix To Charge More For 4K Video

Jason Goatcher Re: Thats Fair (158 comments)

No, don't pay more, then the ISPs win. We need to force more competition.

5 days ago
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Z Machine Makes Progress Toward Nuclear Fusion

Jason Goatcher Re:STOP THE VIDEO ADS SLASHDOT! (151 comments)

All I do is stop most scripts from running. I don't mind ads, just so long as they don't animate without my permission.

about a week ago
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Simple Hack Enables VR Mode For Oculus Rift In Alien: Isolation

Jason Goatcher Damn (57 comments)

As if this game isn't already scary enough as it is, now you can have the creepy alien kill you in 3d.

about two weeks ago
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Study Weighs In On the Reliability of Eyewitness Testimony

Jason Goatcher Re:The whole juror system needs to be abandoned (102 comments)

You're correct that "case law" is meaningless bullshit.
But you're absolutely wrong about laws being objectively, logically, and deterministically. You're also absolutely wrong about laws that are vague or contradictory. Most laws are vague, contradictory, or both, and they're still in full effect.

Have you ever actually sat down and read the law? I suggest you try. In my case, it was income tax law. My conclusion was that the IRS runs on lies and subterfuge. The guy who pointed me in that direction(never actually met him, he sold audio tapes way back in '93 with the pertinent information on them) also suggested people research the speed limit laws if they had a "lead foot."

Not going to judge you if you don't do it, but you might try actually sitting down with the laws. Not the case law BS, but the laws themselves. Focus on things that affect you in a negative way and see what the laws actually say.

Also, realize that very few lawyers respect the literal laws if it contradicts what they've been taught. Living based on the actual laws can be a rather dangerous affair. If you do intend to do this sort of thing, go in 100% or not at all, and be a loudmouth about it. Evil fears the light, and talking about illegal practices is the light I'm talking about.

about two weeks ago
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One In Three Jobs Will Be Taken By Software Or Robots By 2025, Says Gartner

Jason Goatcher Re:automation + liberal capitalism = disaster (405 comments)

My boss is paid near $100k/year. The business relies on people working for free (we have had, at one point, three staff members volunteering) or next-to-nothing (the rest of us get paid the legal minimums) but even then he can't get things right - he commits wage theft to ensure he remains the CEO.

The entire city I live in is like this.

The whole region is like this, almost one quarter of the nation.

They pay us next-to-nothing then accuse us of not working hard enough and even bitch that we're not spending enough.

That's a horrible thing to occur, honestly I wasn't attacking anyone in particular. But think about it, if he could make just as much money without persecuting his workers, don't you think he'd choose that alternate method? I'm guessing he's feeling greed, and not an urge to screw with people. Screwing you guys is a means to an end.

But again, sorry about your situation.

about two weeks ago
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Fuel Efficiency Numbers Overstate MPG More For Cars With Small Engines

Jason Goatcher The small engines are growers (402 comments)

Late at night, in the wee hours, a hand sneaks out of the gas cap and gently rubs the engine. For a short period of time, the car has the same size engine as the other cars.

Okay, now we just need a joke about black cars, and maybe Japanese cars.

about two weeks ago
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Sharp Developing LCD Screens In Almost Any Shape

Jason Goatcher Re:What shape would you like (60 comments)

I am very happy with rectangular shape of the screen. It is very intuitive and practical. GUI windows are rectangular after all.

What shape would you like your screen if you had a chance to customize?

How about a screen that's shaped like a part of a sphere and can change it's concavity based on where the bridge of my nose is?

about two weeks ago
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DoJ: Law Enforcement Can Impersonate People On Facebook

Jason Goatcher Re:disgusting (191 comments)

I really, REALLY, hope this is sarcastic humor.

My dad doesn't believe the nuclear bombing of Hiroshima was a terrorist attack. And people think I'm crazy for some of the things I say about the US of A and it's laws.

It makes me very sad.

about two weeks ago
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One In Three Jobs Will Be Taken By Software Or Robots By 2025, Says Gartner

Jason Goatcher Re:automation + liberal capitalism = disaster (405 comments)

Unless we trust in the kind intentions of our politicians and business owners, I see a dystopian nightmare in the works. We already have the capability to feed, house, and clothe everyone on the planet and look at how many people do without their basic needs being met.

Unless we trust in the kind intentions of our politicians and business owners, I see a dystopian nightmare in the works. We already have the capability to feed, house, and clothe everyone on the planet and look at how many people do without their basic needs being met.

That situation is created by everyone collectively, it's not like the rich are actively preventing people from helping out poor people. The rich aren't always persecuting poor people, sometimes it's simply apathy that causes severe poverty. Not the apathy of the poor person, but the apathy of people who have the time to do things like pay for and screw around on the internet.

Don't get me wrong, I'm guilty too.

about two weeks ago
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One In Three Jobs Will Be Taken By Software Or Robots By 2025, Says Gartner

Jason Goatcher Re:Yes yes yes (405 comments)

Unless we're prepared to have some big (and forced) reductions in populations, we had better get comfortable with larger welfare states.

How does reducing the population help? Then you'll simply have fewer people to buy and sell goods.

I always get bothered when I hear politicians and pundits talk about "labor participation rates". Until the 1960s, we had much lower labor participation rates in the US. Families were able to get by and make progress only having one person in the family working full time. Today, if you're a stay-at-home parent you are counted as "out of the labor force" and politicians will use you as a statistic for why the economy is bad. But that's an ass-backward way of looking at it. If we had a good economy, we'd be able to thrive on a much lower labor participation rate. I mean, what are we talking about here. If someone in 1980 had told me that in the 21st century we'd all have to work harder, for longer hours, and longer into our lives in order to survive, I would have thought they were crazy. But that's where they're at.

Why can't we do that now, instead of reducing the population like you said a few sentences back? People work more because they want more, they see that shiny new Iphone as a necessity rather than a privilege.

Productivity is at record levels, but everyone has to work harder and longer. Does that really make sense to anyone but a "free market conservative"?

I generally consider myself a conservative, but I agree. Forcing people to succeed to the point their stressed out is wrong. We shouldn't hate others for having a different work ethic than us, it's only when it affects us that we should have a problem.

about two weeks ago
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Study Weighs In On the Reliability of Eyewitness Testimony

Jason Goatcher Re:The whole juror system needs to be abandoned (102 comments)

Agreed. The flaw in jury by peers is that the law is written to be incomprehensible, so the jury is forced to defer to the lawyers about what actions could possibly be considered a crime

This is a fallacious argument that simply helps dishonest lawyers make money. Reading the law isn't fun, it's rather tedious, but it's not simply a mishmash of laws. Absent of case law, which has no legal basis in the American judicial system, laws are written to be understood the way a computer would understand a computer problem. You simply read them and apply them. If there are any contradictions or vagueness, then that part of the law is simply void and doesn't apply to that particular case.

about two weeks ago
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Study Weighs In On the Reliability of Eyewitness Testimony

Jason Goatcher Re:Documentary (102 comments)

Depending on the situation, the "whole truth" and "nothing but the truth" are two different things. One could argue the "whole truth" would include opinions while also arguing that "nothing but the truth" would only include verifiable facts. Which means telling the "whole truth and nothing but the truth" could be a logical impossibility in some situations.

about two weeks ago
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It's Not Just How Smart You Are: Curiosity Is Key To Learning

Jason Goatcher Re:I'm curious.... (83 comments)

Sorry, I should've added the word unhypocritically.

about two weeks ago

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