Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

An 8,000 Ton Giant Made the Jet Age Possible

JavaManJim Re:now technology (307 comments)

I love these old machines. Here the sturdy cast iron Royal Typewriter. They work nearly forever and give your fingers a little workout as you use it. I myself have an old Royal that I got off eBay used by this guy's mom then put into a garage forever. Its the kind with a glass panel on each side. Need to clean everything up just like you did.

Then I had a Sears Kenmore lawnmower once that was magnesium and clearly forged by a nifty fifty or its variant.

more than 2 years ago
top

Happy World Amateur Radio Day

JavaManJim Re:Stifling regulations and old timers (82 comments)

Thanks for your cogent comments and replies. I LOVE the idea of being able to fix your own electronics (vs buying another). After building an electronic kit you have the ability to detect and fix many obvious electronic problems.

And please any AARL old timers around this thread. Would you help train a novice? Would you support a novice? Myself and others need this.

more than 2 years ago
top

What Is the Most Influential Programming Book?

JavaManJim Re:No Indeed good sir (624 comments)

Agreed, a little known book for C++ from the ground up. Is an extremely well organized book "Starting Out With C++" by Gaddis. Dietel and Dietel C++ is manageable but its a thicket of information that makes it tough for some (I have gone through Deitel C++ and Dietel Java). There are a thousand books on C++ and probably a thousand squared number of paths to learning C++. Whatever your C++ journey, have fun!

The C classic is wonderful The C Programming Language Brian Kernighan and Dennis Ritchie.

Knuth is computer philosophy. Makes your soul shine. Treat it like philosophy, read it at leisure and think hard about every word on every page.

more than 2 years ago
top

Bezos Discloses Failure of Blue Origin Rocket Test Flight

JavaManJim POGO PROBLEM? (99 comments)

POGO oscillation used to be a problem with rockets. Wonder if those POGO sputters from the Blue Origin picture were the problem or not? One might think that today's rockets like Blue Origin are so sophisticated that they are happy with POGO oscillation. The Wiki article is below. Would appreciate any knowledgeable insight on this.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pogo_oscillation

more than 2 years ago
top

Could You Pass Harvard's Entrance Exam From 1869?

JavaManJim Re: Cube root (741 comments)

Yes the cube root is trivial. You can do cube roots in your head. See pp209-211 of "Secrets of mental Math" Arthur Benjamin & Michael Shermer.

As to slide rules cube roots there are the K and D scales - some basic slide rules do not have K and D scales.

Hope this helps some,
Jim

more than 3 years ago
top

Could You Pass Harvard's Entrance Exam From 1869?

JavaManJim Re:Nope (741 comments)

Future Latin teacher?

What kind of background in school are you using for this? Classes books etc? I know a Judge where I live who majored in classical studies (and has a great background). Now he's a civil judge.

Also what is your favorite study method for Latin and etc? FYI I made mp3 from a Ralph McInerny cassette that came with "Lets Read Latin". This is Ecclesiastical Latin which is like modern Italian and Spanish. I could create a CD out of the mp3 for you if you want.

Jim

more than 3 years ago
top

Could You Pass Harvard's Entrance Exam From 1869?

JavaManJim Re:Nope (741 comments)

Vieux, happy you still have your dad's Greek primer (bet its Attic Greek). I have a Latin grammar from 1930 and the classic languages haven't changed much.

My dad and his friends studied and knew Greek. And conversed with each other occasionally in Greek (late night at parties). But they were college facility too. Phd's every one of them. Every one of them knew Latin too.

Personally I think we should have a good grasp of a foreign language, math through calculus, statistics, philosophy. Also knowing a few jokes and a daily read of a national news paper. And have a good background for your day job stuff. Kind of a rounded person we can talk to (and not tech school curriculum). My two cents worth.

Right now I am trying to learn Latin and Greek. Pronunciation is the interesting part here. Plimseur for the Greek (modern pronunciation).

All the best,
Jim

more than 3 years ago
top

AT&T's Metered Billing Off By Up To 4,700%

JavaManJim Re:One more reason to not do metering. (250 comments)

Sounds good, would it be OK to post your schematics and details on construction? I think double checking everything is necessary today.

Thanks,
Jim

more than 3 years ago
top

What Happened To the Bay Bridge?

JavaManJim Re:small (407 comments)

I am only replying to save this as a placeholder for this segment/thread. Fascinating little tidbit. I would like to hear a lot more of how "hey!" thinks (about anything). An interesting mind there.

Thanks!

more than 4 years ago
top

Software To Flatten a Photographed Book?

JavaManJim Re:Some cheap cameras can do it (172 comments)

That's a Nikon CoolPix 5200. p38 in the manual.
"Scene Mode" "Copy"

"Copy provides clear pictures of text or drawings on a white
board or in printed matter such as a business card."

"Colored text and drawings may not show up well in the final picture"

more than 4 years ago
top

AT&T Makes Its Terms of Service Even Worse, To Discourage Lawsuits

JavaManJim Re:Weirdly working - not working DSL (412 comments)

2A that's NOT a staple but a straightened out paper clip. I use this to poke it into the reset hole in the back of the DSL modem. This erases the stored userid and password.

more than 4 years ago
top

AT&T Makes Its Terms of Service Even Worse, To Discourage Lawsuits

JavaManJim Weirdly working - not working DSL (412 comments)

My DSL has experienced these local solvable issues.

1. Lots of intermittent line failure. The wire from my DSL modem to the wall corroded. A look using a magnifying glass showed significant corrosion of the four wires that plug into the wall. A new cable from Fry's fixed this.

2. My DSL modem. Netopia if you want to know. Fails occasionally.

2A. When its working go to DOS and find the modem's address.
DOS
nbtstat
Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 172.32.0.254 (get this ip address)

2A. I have a staple to reset via that hole in the back of the DSL modem.

2C. I type http://172.32.0.254/ which brings up a little web page from
the DSL modem I go to the setup tab and type my DSL modem's userid
and password. Your modem may vary.

Hope this helps!

more than 4 years ago
top

AT&T Makes Its Terms of Service Even Worse, To Discourage Lawsuits

JavaManJim Re:Speaking of Class-Action Suits (412 comments)

I have had ATT for about three years now.

First I got ATT BASIC DSL like you have. Same speed as you only my down was ~750kbs and UP ~350kbs. That was via copper physical medium to the switching station. I was just inside the max distance. I think I had the last or only copper connection. An ATT guy living below me could not order a an ATT DSL connection.

BEWARE THE ATT PRO UPGRADE! Had connection issues not related to ATT (long story omitted). ATT tech said oh you need to go fiber instead of that crummy old copper. The ATT repair tech was great. She even showed me the nearby HVAC underground switching station.

UNANNOUNCED PRICE INCREASES. Yes fiber is faster and used to cost $20 a month. This month Aug my ATT long distance was cut about a third. But my internet DSL was raised to $30. Guess what? The changes cancel each other out. By the way ATT told me about long distance but DID NOT TELL ME my internet was going up.

So I wonder. What happened to market competition? Where else can I go for cheaper phone and DSL service? Better than a total of $84/month.

Thanks

more than 4 years ago
top

Playing a First-Person Shooter Using Real Guns

JavaManJim What do these scores mean? (225 comments)

What's "expert"? The list of qualifications. Then more please on your 221 and 7 out of ten experience. 7 out of 10 what's?

For example in my little world of high power rifle.

A Individual classification
    High Master 97% or above
    Master 94%-96.99%
    Expert 89%-93.99%
    Sharpshooter 84%-88.99%
    Marksman below 84%

B targets and sizes

    200 yard target
    Aiming black
    x ring 3"
    10 ring 7"
    9 ring 13"
    Rings in white
    8 ring 19"
    7 ring 25"
    6 ring 31"
    5 ring 37"

    300 yard target
    Aiming black
    x ring 3"
    10 ring 7"
    9 ring 13"
    8 ring 19"
    Rings in white
    7 ring 25"
    6 ring 31"
    5 ring 37"

    600 yard target
    Aiming black
    x ring 6"
    10 ring 12"
    9 ring 18"
    8 ring 24"
    7 ring 36"
    Rings in white
    6 ring 48"
    5 ring 60"

What are your target values, the size of the 10, 9, 8, etc rings?

Thanks,
Jim

more than 4 years ago
top

Company Claims Potential Magnification In Bio Fuel Production

JavaManJim Re:big oil is not stupidly evil (260 comments)

The parent comment is not insightful as graded. Please downgrade to 1.

Reason is I have worked in the petroleum production business. Oil is here and there in certain strata under the ground. Sometimes like in the East Texas Oil field its a puddle 3,300 feet under the ground. Cheap to extract. Other wells cost upward of 20 million to drill so their associated costs are much higher. Even more so if the well is far offshore. Finally an oil company is in business to produce the stuff. They never ever hoard oil. It may appear that way because come oil is more expensive to produce than a current price per barrel indicates.

Think back last Summer when oil price per barrel was extremely high $147. Every energy project was golden. Every expensive well could be turned on. Boone Pickens could invest in wind turbines because at $147 his expensive wind turbines were competitive.

about 5 years ago
top

The Rocky Road To Wind Power

JavaManJim Re:And Distillation Columns are Small? (281 comments)

I suppose the difference between windmill shipment and distillation column shipment are the destinations.
A petro chemical plant is situated near highways. And same probably for the distillation column manufacturer.

But windmill destinations are way out in the boonies through small towns and smaller roads.

Thanks,
Jim

about 5 years ago
top

The Rocky Road To Wind Power

JavaManJim Re:My -2 cents observation better transport design (281 comments)

Yes, I suppose those help a little bit. Especially those guys carrying something that juts up like the elbow of a digging machine screeching to a stop.

That hit yesterday was physics to the max powerful. Somewhere amongst the road litter of cement chunks there is a bow shaped piece of that armor strip.

Have a great weekend,
Jim

about 5 years ago
top

The Rocky Road To Wind Power

JavaManJim Re:My -2 cents observation better transport design (281 comments)

In the USA (here TX only), I have not seen much construction like you describe. Especially the height warning signs. Most highways here have two height signs and a fairly generous clearance. But no specialized IR light interruption warning signs. And certainly no sacrificial beams. In lieu of sacrificial beams, TXDOT found that the pillars were vulnerable so care was put in directing wayward trucks away from the support pillars.

Thanks,
Jim

about 5 years ago
top

The Rocky Road To Wind Power

JavaManJim Re:Railroads (281 comments)

Your picture and description is excellent. But I suspect that the largest wind turbines might easily the width of a railroad track (something like 12 feet).

I think your suggestion to air lift might be interesting. If weight is not exceeded. If a heavy lift helicopter can lift about 45,000 kg /99,208 lbs /49.6 tons.
http://www.aerospaceweb.org/question/helicopters/q0284.shtml

Thanks,
Jim

about 5 years ago
top

The Rocky Road To Wind Power

JavaManJim My -2 cents observation better transport design (281 comments)

Observations,

These are very special hauling requirements, so they require a much more specialized design. I am uneasy about that generic hauling truck trailer shown in the picture.

1. If the blades are 50 yards long, then designing a hauling truck like an old fire engine ladder truck might be better. Those had a rear cab and movable wheel carriages in the back.
2. Also the trailer design in the picture is horrible regarding height. Design a trailer with lengthwise side support that allows blades to travel four or five feet lower. This could also incorporate hydraulic lifting to raise the trailer over bumps and low spots. Think lowrider cars that jump up.
3. Additional tires on the truck and trailers to distribute weight and save the roadways. Heavy equipment haulers here in TX once in a while have as many as 50 wheels per tractor\trailer(s). For max wheels see this site (the bottom picture).
http://www.goodtransportationinc.com/
4. I hope for low interstate overpasses that trucks could exit, then take the service road up, over (and adjacent) to the interstate then return to the interstate.
5. And a lead car with laser height and side measurement device to alert the hauling convoy of incorrect, changed, or terrain shifted height/side measurements.

I know this is blitheringly obvious. But plan and triple check. Just yesterday in Dallas a large fork lift plowed into a 14 foot 5 inch clearance underpass and thoroughly shattered the first cement beam.
http://www.wfaa.com/sharedcontent/dws/wfaa/latestnews/stories/wfaa090722_wz_tootall.6696c458.html

Thanks,
Jim

about 5 years ago

Submissions

top

JavaManJim JavaManJim writes  |  more than 7 years ago

JavaManJim writes "This week marks the passing of a calculus icon. Did you ever suffer through "Thomas' Calculus" or any of his other books? If so, then please shed a tear for George B. Thomas who passed away on Monday 11/13/2006. Myself long before Monday, I cried and laughed, flunked and passed, hated and loved that old book. Spent many a night mastering its mysteries. Have kept up with the editions, its in its 11th edition now and I keep it handy to refresh my neurons.

What have your experiences been during and after studying "Thomas' Calculus" or any of his other books? Did you ever have the benefit of being taught by Dr. Thomas himself?

Below is the NYTIMES article.
Source: http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/13/us/13thomas.html ?_r=1&oref=slogin

George B. Thomas Jr., 92, Dies; Wrote Calculus Text

By JEREMY PEARCE
Published: November 13, 2006

George B. Thomas Jr., a mathematician whose widely read calculus textbook has introduced legions of students to the challenges of functions, derivatives and integrals since the early 1950s, died on Oct. 31 in State College, Pa. He was 92.

Dr. Thomas's death was confirmed by his family.

His book, "Calculus and Analytic Geometry," was published by Addison-Wesley in 1951 and remains in print, now in its 11th edition as "Thomas' Calculus." It was intended for undergraduates but has since become a text in high schools, where it is assigned for advanced courses in calculus, the branch of mathematics that deals with quantities and limits, areas, and volumes of spaces, among other topics.

Dr. Thomas, who taught at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for four decades, was the sole author until the 1970s, when he began a collaboration with another mathematician, Ross Lee Finney III, in making periodic revisions.

Hartley Rogers Jr., a professor of mathematics at M.I.T., praised Dr. Thomas's clarity and selection of problems and said his book represented "a new departure" from previous texts.

"George Thomas presented calculus in a way that was closer to real mathematics," Dr. Rogers said, "giving a strong sense of functions and number systems that hadn't been adequately emphasized in earlier textbooks."

At the outset of his career, Dr. Thomas had considered teaching high school math, and he later helped coach and prepare schoolteachers in calculus and other subjects. With Frederick Mosteller and R. E. K. Rourke, he wrote another textbook, "Probability and Statistics" (Addison-Wesley, 1961).

George Brinton Thomas Jr. was born in Boise, Idaho. He received his undergraduate and master's degrees from Washington State College before earning a doctorate in mathematics from Cornell in 1940.

Dr. Thomas was named an assistant professor of mathematics at M.I.T. in 1944 and became a professor in 1960. He retired in 1978.

Dr. Thomas's wife of 39 years, the former Jane Heath, died in 1975. He then married Thais Erving, who died in 1983. He lived in Concord, Mass., before moving to State College in 1990.

He is survived by two daughters, Fay Bakhru of Glen Mills, Pa., a former math teacher, and Jean Thomas of West Chester, Pa.; a son, James H., of Owls Head, Me.; three sisters, Trudy Nelson of Twin Falls, Idaho, Carol Hypes of Greeley, Colo., and Peggy Turner of Lubbock, Tex.; two stepdaughters, Melissa Goggin of Beverly, Mass., and Susan Hamill of Union, Me.; a stepson, Brad Waldron of Beverly; nine grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren.

Best wishes to all you math mavens,
Jim Burke"

Journals

JavaManJim has no journal entries.

Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...