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Pope Francis: There Are Limits To Freedom of Expression

Jesrad Pope Francis is pissing all over MY religion ! (894 comments)

It might sound fine to you but it's definitely not fine with me. By saying that one ought not to insult a religion, pope Francis denies me the right to practice my own religion, Discordianism, for which blaspheme, apostasy and heresy are actual religious duties.

He's denying me the right to practice my religion, and basically insults my most sacred beliefs, while denying everyone the right to insult religions in general. What an hypocrite.

So, yes, shupt the fuck up Francis, and go fuck your mother.

about two weeks ago
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Parents Investigated For Neglect For Letting Kids Walk Home Alone

Jesrad Biased Institutions FTW (784 comments)

"I think what CPS considered neglect, we felt was an essential part of growing up and maturing," says Alexander. "We feel we're being bullied into a point of view about child-rearing that we strongly disagree with."

The "child protection" services have all the apparent responsibilities of caring, without having to pay the price for the efforts they demand. That's why they are intrinsically biased in favor of perpertually inflating the needs of childs and the duties of caretakers... to the point of ridiculous extremes.

about two weeks ago
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Study Casts Doubt On Mammoth-Killing Cosmic Impact

Jesrad Study debunks nothing at all, move along (19 comments)

The study focuses solely on siliceous scoria droplets, says they were made from local rock in high temperature but conventional fires. Well, that's great to know, but the Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis has agreed on that all along anyway. Those scoria were indeed local and made in fires - like the vast fires that spread everywhere after the airburst. The best evidence for the very high temperature and pressure associated with impact is not the siliceous scoria droplets, but the hexagonal-structure nanodiamonds (lonsdaleite) found all over the large zone sampled: http://test.scripts.psu.edu/de...

about three weeks ago
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The Downside of Connected Healthcare: Cyberchondria

Jesrad Re:What other choice is there? (79 comments)

My wife's GP was just like that, but France's socialized healthcare structure made life impossible for him so he moved to Switzerland :(

about three weeks ago
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The Downside of Connected Healthcare: Cyberchondria

Jesrad Re:What other choice is there? (79 comments)

This has been my experience too, unfortunately. But, hey, at least your doctor straight-out asked you what tests you wanted. I had to argue with mine just to get to that point.

For most of my life I’ve had episodes of tachycardia, intense nausea+vomiting, severe muscular weakness and dizziness happening seemingly randomly sometimes after physical exertion or exposition to cold. I’ve had an abnormally early puberty with almost absent secondary sexual characteristics. Also, at times my limbs become paralysed, unable to move at all except for breathing and talking, it usually happens after resting.

The crises receded in my 20s when I became prediabetic and grew very fat, and came back with a vengeance after I followed a very low carb diet in my 30s, lost the extra weight and suppressed my HbA1c back to healthy level. In a few of those ‘new and improved’ crises I almost died, so I firmly committed to finding an explanation and possibly a cure. The occasional paralysis also came back.

I went to my GP who prescribed a dozen blood tests, then some more, and then assumed it was all in my head somehow. After more arguing and disproving some of his false assumptions (mostly about my character and reactions to stress) he grudgingly dismissed me to an endocrinologist. I thought I was making progress at last.

The endo swept most of the lab tests aside and just assumed that I was overdosing on vitamin D (which I only had been supplementing in the previous winter months). So I stopped all vitD and saw no improvement on the crises’ front.

I talked about all this to a (rather unorthodox) psychotherapist, in case it really was in my head all along, and this guy suggested instead it might be some rare genetic disease at play. He then asked for a second opinion from a friend of his, a surgeon with a fondness for puzzles, who accused me of either being insane or of lying about my symptoms and lab results – because it all made no sense to him and he had no answer.

I never held the medical profession in any special regard to begin with, to me they’ve always been highly-trained workers with heads full of precious, specific knowledge but with little wisdom to connect it all and make sense of it except in the most common clinical cases. But even if I had special consideration for them, I’d have certainly lost it after all this, because they’ve been right next to useless. All the useful data I got so far came from blood tests I had to pry from them with pointy words, all their proposed treatments failed, all their explanations conflicted with already present evidence. It’s like they have no curiosity at all, and little training in actual science – as in epistemology = the proper way of forming beliefs from objective reality.

To think that there are millions of people like me, all with all kinds of rare diseases that all these doctors know little or nothing about, that the medical profession fails to help in the same way, is rather unnerving.

To this date, and all on my own using the Internet, some dangerous self-experiments and my college training in science, I have finally figured out diet adjustments that really do work for me, preventing the crises and drastically reducing the frequency and severity of the paralysis episodes. It consists of avoiding a long list of food items, and gobbling salt by the gram nearly every day. I’ve had zero crisis since.

The websites that actually helped me: support groups' forums for people with CAH and Addison's disease (neither I have though... mine might be pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1, except it’s unusually mild and with a late onset, and covers only half the symptoms), Wikipedia's trove of pages about steroidogenesis and associated disorders, and several obscure publications on PubMed about specificities of organ-specific aldosterone receptors and the genetics thereof.

At this point the “proper” thing I should do is find a geneticist and confirm the suspicions of having some unclear, maybe unknown, rare disease, or just keep doing my stuff and disregard medical “help”. And the former really looks like a waste of time and money... I've just sent a DNA sample to 23andme as a stab in the dark, I'm waiting on the results now.

about three weeks ago
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'Citizenfour' Producers Sued Over Edward Snowden Leaks

Jesrad Re: Does he stand a chance? (163 comments)

That provision only covers money made from the information itself, and not the money made from how the information got divulged, nor information about the information.

It's a subtle but significant difference.

about a month ago
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US Links North Korea To Sony Hacking

Jesrad Dubious because facts (182 comments)

Marc Rogers disagrees strongly, and poitns at a long list of evidence that make it much more likely that it was a vengeful inside-job badly disguised into a Nork attack for unrelated publicity added-value:
- elements of language that do not fit north-korean lingo
- hardcoded filepaths indicating insider knowledge
- social-network savvyness unlike anything the DPRK ever did
- no mention of The Interview movie until after the possible tie with DPRK was suggested ... and more.

about a month and a half ago
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NASA Study Proposes Airships, Cloud Cities For Venus Exploration

Jesrad Re:it can be air filled (200 comments)

Also mind the day duration: the Venus sidereal day is 243 Earth days. That makes for a worse than polar night, solar panel-wise, and that's not even counting the permanent, thick cloud cover. There just is no point in reaching the venusian ground and its lead-melting heat. It's far better to hang in the high atmosphere, well above the sulfuric acid clouds, and loft around in the 200 mph winds, circling the planet every 4 or 5 Earth days.

about a month and a half ago
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NASA Study Proposes Airships, Cloud Cities For Venus Exploration

Jesrad Re:As with all space missions: (200 comments)

Meat starts cooking at around 60C.

about a month and a half ago
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CIA Lied Over Brutal Interrogations

Jesrad Re:America, you stink. (772 comments)

You are referring to the islamists you funded and trained in your war against the soviets, right ?

about 1 month ago
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CIA Lied Over Brutal Interrogations

Jesrad Re: Really? (772 comments)

Of course Hitler won. He won the moment the same antihumanist ideas that formed most of his ideology were also adopted by your very own top social class and government executives back in the 1920s and 1930s.

Look at the names of the founders and forefront proponents of every "population control" organisation that arised back then, and read what they wrote, it's all the same: the focal point is about exterminating and/or sterilizing the "genetically inferior races" and the "feeble-minded", at an industrial scale, in order to "improve" the human race "stock" and preserve its natural environment from overuse and exhaustion.

Then look at the conditions enforced on third-world countries in exchange for foreign US aid and world bank aid back in the 60s and 70s: programs of mass (often forced) sterilisations for the poor populations, that were done in unsanitary conditions.

The nazis have won, and today they're in charge of most of your foreign aid programs and environmental protection programs, they have been exterminating for decades, they still are at it right now.

about 1 month ago
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2 Futures Can Explain Time's Mysterious Past

Jesrad Re:Time travel (107 comments)

Boring. I might head there next week-end if I can bother, or maybe the one after. Time travel means I can procrastinate indefinitely.

about 2 months ago
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Programmer Father Asks: What Gets Little Girls Interested In Science?

Jesrad Re:She's _4_ (584 comments)

That and more. I've been trying to sneak some of the wilder Doctor Who references through, too.

about 2 months ago
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Do you worry about the singularity?

Jesrad Re:No, it's not even possible (181 comments)

Your mind is a process that exists through a tangible substrate. Therefore it can be reproduced artificially.

I am not saying that souls do not exist, I'm saying that souls actually exist in objective reality as complex bundles of (neg)entropic processes, that arise from the right sort and amount of physical phenomenon.

It's only a matter of time before we can measure, copy, move and alter them.

about 2 months ago
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Programmer Father Asks: What Gets Little Girls Interested In Science?

Jesrad Re:She's _4_ (584 comments)

Maybe the father can give his daughter examples of actual princesses' lives and deeds, since it seems to be such a spontaneous center of interest for her. Like the bios of Grace Kelly, Diana, Margaret of Snowdon, Beatrice of York, etc.

Full disclosure: my 5 year old niece is a prime piece of Disney'dest princess-wannabe, and I regularly take great delight in trolling her with facts about real princes and princesses, and alternate versions of her favorite stories.

about 2 months ago
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People Trained To Experience an Overlap In Senses Also Receive IQ Boost

Jesrad Re:IQ is not a simple measure (68 comments)

534 is a red, rounded corner box containing a green rectangle with a blue blob inside. Which makes it rather pungent than gingery.

about 2 months ago
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Martin Jetpack Closer To Takeoff In First Responder Applications

Jesrad Re:Not a jet pack (55 comments)

I still wonder how hard it would be to just use a pair or triplet of AMT Titan microjet engines to make an actual jetpack ? That's the smaller-is-better approach "Jetman" has followed, with success.

about 2 months ago
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ISPs Removing Their Customers' Email Encryption

Jesrad Re:Most severs shouldn't be vulnerable (245 comments)

I'm trying to get them to block-list all of Nigeria off the Webmail. With 120000 users we get about a couple compromised accounts each month, which I think is actually good. And 99% of the time it's from a 41.xxx address.

about 2 months ago
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MARS, Inc: We Are Running Out of Chocolate

Jesrad Wonder what planet the 'extra' cocoa comes from (323 comments)

Chocolate deficits, whereby farmers produce less cocoa than the world eats, are becoming the norm. Already, we are in the midst of what could be the longest streak of consecutive chocolate deficits in more than 50 years. It also looks like deficits aren't just carrying over from year-to-year—the industry expects them to grow. Last year, the world ate roughly 70,000 metric tons more cocoa than it produced.

So last year we imported 70 000 tons of cocoa from... outside Earth ? Or are there long-term stocks of cocoa somewhere ? Because if the latter, then getting rid of those stocks year after year and moving to a tighter production chain makes a lot of sense, and fits in the trend of decreasing transaction costs. It could also be a sign that producers expect their cocoa products to sell less well in the future, or raw cocoa to become cheaper. In any case, the claims in TFA make little sense.

about 2 months ago
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ISPs Removing Their Customers' Email Encryption

Jesrad Re:Most severs shouldn't be vulnerable (245 comments)

A well configured server will behave this way on the *submission* port (587) but if the MX port (25) were configured this way then you would be blocking a lot of legitimate email from old servers on the internet that do not support STARTTLS

That's what we do here on the big-gov't email servers. Filtering for non-auth'd relays curbs spam quite cheaply. We already have an answer for ISPs who'd complain about rejection: "Tough."

about 3 months ago

Submissions

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Privately-funded study to test coconut oil as treatment for Alzheimer's

Jesrad Jesrad writes  |  about 6 months ago

Jesrad (716567) writes "Following the growing viral popularity of Dr Mary Newport's reported success in treating her Alzheimer's Disease-stricken husband with coconut oil, and some positive results of in-vitro tests, come news of a clinical trial of coconut oil as a potential treatment for halting and reversing symptoms of the neuron-destroying disease."
Link to Original Source
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Going from traditional DVD distribution to direct Internet sales and streaming

Jesrad Jesrad writes  |  about 10 months ago

Jesrad (716567) writes "Independant documentary producer Tom Naughton recounts how going with a traditional DVD worldwide distribution of his movie 'Fat head' almost bankrupted him, and how he turned the situation around by going with direct Internet sales from his blog and with Hulu/Netflix distribution instead. The account shows just how badly middle-men of the movie industry and Hollywood accounting can burden up independant film-makers, and how short-cutting them using the Internet can let them finally get a dime from their own work. Jump to below the photos for the edifying read."
Link to Original Source
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Leaked document details ADA's plan for internet nutrition censorship

Jesrad Jesrad writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Jesrad (716567) writes "Using two leaked internal documents, Forbes' Micheal Ellsberg offers a deep look into the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (formerly American Dietetics Association) plans to stifle competition in the diet counsel and nutritional advice market, up to and including severe internet censorship, in a manner reminiscent of how they had previously treated Steve Cooksey of diabetes-warrior.net.

The documents outline a detailed policy of surveilling and frequent reporting of citizens who provide nutrition advice publicly, providing continued justification for licensure laws through 'continual incidents to investigate'. The wording makes it extra clear that the goal of their lobbying for restrictive licensing laws is not concern for the public's health or safety, but rather 'adding member value' in order to further and strengthen their practice's scope."

Link to Original Source
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Jesrad Jesrad writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Jesrad (716567) writes "While looking for away to heat up and destroy cancerous cells using radiowaves, Sanibel Island resident John Kanzius was surprised to see his saltwater sample ignite and produce a big flame instead of just heating up. It seems the apparatus radiolyses water molecules into hydrogen and oxygen, which can immediately recombine and burn. It's not known yet how energy-efficient the process is, but it could make hydrogen production cheap and fast."
Link to Original Source

Journals

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EULAs and the risk of corporate law-making.

Jesrad Jesrad writes  |  more than 11 years ago

The more I think of EULAs (End User License Agreements), the more I think they are a tool designed to take away law-making from law-makers, into the hands of copyright holders everywhere.

They make it possible for copyright holders to force insane clauses on unsuspecting customers, after all.

Are EULAs enforceable ? In countries such as Holland and Norway, they are not. They have no legal value whatsoever. In the USA, the DMCA makes it possible, provided you incorporate some "copyright protection" (ROT13 could qualify), you can enforce whatever EULA you bundle with your copyrighted work. In many other countries, the issue is not clear, and EULAs stand in a state of legal limbo. Some companies take advantage of this fuzzy situation, like Oracle, who uses EULAs to frighten their customers into not reverse-engineering their software _even though the Law explicitly grants them this right_. Would a judge be convinced ? I don't think so.

Some corporations have been abusing these EULAs to extort money from other organizations (i.e. Microsoft with schools, enforcing its nefarious "audit" right they granted to themselves in the EULA). This means it is URGENT to have law-makers everywhere clear this issue once and for all.

The two solutions (Holland/Norway solution of stating EULAs are void of any legality, and the US solution of enforcing terms of the EULA through "copyright protection devices") have their own advantages and inconvenients.

The US solution gives copyright holders the possibility to make their own laws for enforcing their EULAs' terms. The Holland/Norway one gives customers back their fair use rights and protects them from abuse and some forms of extortion.

The US solution is, IMHO, a very bad one. But the Holland/Norway solution has one major issue: the voiding of EULAs means that software editors are liable for their products. This threatens the very existence of the software industry, by making them pay for bugs and security breaches. It could sink Microsoft, it could sink Red Hat, it could sink Apple, it could send Linus Torvalds or RMS in jail or financial oblivion.

Of course I have a solution to this problem... Pass a law that makes EULAs explicitly void of any legal enforceability (like Norway Law does), and that mandates a minimal guarantee on software that consists of a full refund and/or access to the source code.

What ? Me biased in favor of Open Source ?
--
Disclaimer: IANAL, but I studied national and international Intellectual Property Right with lawyers in College. If you have legal precedents concerning these issues to give me, you are Very Welcome to post them here.

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