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The Physics of Why Cold Fusion Isn't Real

Jherico Re:Muon-catalyzed fusion is cold and very real (342 comments)

Very much this.

The problem I have with this article is that it's basically pointing out a tautology. The kind of fusion created by slamming atoms together at high speed (in other words, high temperature fusion) can't be done at low temperatures. OK, but we have empirical evidence of other mechanisms for causing fusion.

Other forms of catalyzed fusion, if they exist, probably also require some pretty exotic physics, or we'd see lots of evidence of unusually high energy output in nature.

3 days ago
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Reverse Engineering the Oculus Rift DK2's Positional Tracking Tech

Jherico Re:Linux (26 comments)

I understand this point of view, but on the other hand, I think that the VR killer app hasn't been found yet. The 'mainstream' equation works both ways. Sure there's a bigger potential customer base for VR apps running on Windows and OSX, but I think there's a bigger 'idea base' for new VR apps with hackers running Linux.

about two weeks ago
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Reverse Engineering the Oculus Rift DK2's Positional Tracking Tech

Jherico Re:Article mentions me! (26 comments)

The Oculus SDK license specifically forbids using it to connect to non-Oculus hardware. On the other hand, they've recently released the full specs of the DK1 as open source, so it's now possible to legally build a piece of hardware that the SDK itself can't distinguish from the real thing. Hypothetically speaking, since the most recent version of the SDK relies on a runtime to communicate with the hardware, if you could spoof the runtime communication (which happens over a socket) then you could use any IMU you want to at all, as long as you replicated the mechanism that the runtime uses to send tracking data to a Rift enabled application. This is probably a violation of SDK / Runtime the license, but if you do a clean-room reverse engineering of the runtime you might be ok? IANAL.

about two weeks ago
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Reverse Engineering the Oculus Rift DK2's Positional Tracking Tech

Jherico Re:Article barely mentions me... (26 comments)

It's not hard to monitor HID, lol. None of this is hidden, buried, or secret. It's just not published. Anyone who has the SDK can easily do what you did.

Thank Captain Hindsight. Sure, technically anybody could have done it. But no one else actually did it, despite the numerous Linux developers complaining about the total lack of positional support for them. It's pretty easy to look at someone else's work and say "Oh, yeah, that's obvious" once they've actually done it. I don't really see why you've bothered commenting since you seem to be of the opinion that the entire exercise was pointless. If you don't buy into the entire premise of the article how can you be bothered to have an opinion of whether one of the participants in the work received proper credit?

about two weeks ago
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Reverse Engineering the Oculus Rift DK2's Positional Tracking Tech

Jherico Article mentions me! (26 comments)

Never mind. They've corrected the article.

about two weeks ago
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Reverse Engineering the Oculus Rift DK2's Positional Tracking Tech

Jherico Re:Article barely mentions me... (26 comments)

Anyone with the SDK can get these codes. Oh, and you made a thread on Reddit.

Really? Oliver explicitly said he'd had no luck in getting the codes. The SDK doesn't contain them, btw. Only the Oculus runtime, which is closed source, now communicates with the hardware. So, anyone who had the SDK and could also figure out how to write a DLL to intercept the HID calls made by the runtime (not the SDK, which doesn't contain the codes anywhere) could get the codes.

about two weeks ago
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Reverse Engineering the Oculus Rift DK2's Positional Tracking Tech

Jherico Article barely mentions me... (26 comments)

I think that the article kind of unfairly glosses over my contribution. I posted the original reddit thread, and I'm the one who discovered the codes required to actually enable the LEDs on the device. I appreciate that Oliver is an actual VR researcher, but I did this in part to get some visibility for the book I'm writing on Oculus Rift development.

about two weeks ago
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Amazon Nears Debut of Original TV Shows

Jherico Re:Way to miss the mark Amazon. (66 comments)

There are a bunch of comedies and a bunch of kids shows because Amazon is probably going to start of producing a comedy and a kid's show, because they're both proven genres. Having decided to do so, they produced a bunch of pilots in each genre with the intent of picking one or two of the best results. People keep reacting to these pilots as if they're the first episodes of a set of series Amazon will make, but they're not.

Also, while the networks are overloaded on comedies, they're sadly lacking in stuff that includes the way real human beings talk (i.e. saying fuck) or stuff that can include drug humor, so there's plenty of room for doing stuff that hasn't been seen before.

about a year and a half ago
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Amazon Nears Debut of Original TV Shows

Jherico Re:Coincidentally I just watched two of the pilots (66 comments)

Well, suffice to say that spreading their dollars across numerous pilots instead of one single show gets you what you expect: utter trash.

You can't compare the budget with House of Cards with the budget spent on these episodes. Amazon didn't make these pilots as an alternative to spending a lot of money on a single show. They did it as a prelude to spending a bunch of money on one or two shows.

I'm pretty certain Netflix produced a bunch of pilots which were equally as shaky as the Amazon work. The only difference is that those weren't shown to the general public, just focus groups and Netflix execs, and they picked the ones that they thought had the most promise. Many, if not most shows start out with a pilot that isn't nearly as good quality as the finished product, and not all series air a pilot as the first episode.

Your reaction to the pilots is pretty much why pilots don't get shown to the general audience: because most people go in with an expectation built up over years of watching final products.

about a year and a half ago
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How Would an Astronaut Falling Into a Black Hole Die?

Jherico Re:To an outside observer he'd never die (412 comments)

This depends on the size of the black hole. The larger the black hole, the smaller the tidal forces at the actual event horizon, in which case you're correct, he just seems to slow down and redshift from an outside observer. However, for a small enough black hole he'll be ripped apart and quite dead long before he reaches the event horizon. If it's small enough to have a hot accretion disk (whether the disk is there or not).

about a year and a half ago
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NASA's Basement Nuclear Reactor

Jherico Re:Sounds Highly Dubious (368 comments)

Read it again. It says the nickel becomes copper, which means that the proton isn't ejected from the nucleus. The energy of it and the electron will end up getting distributed as thermal energy. I suppose you might get some beta radiation at the edges if electron escape the nucleus with enough energy, but that's nowhere nearly as dangerous as something like a fast neutron.

about a year and a half ago
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Ask Slashdot: What To Do About Patent Trolls Seeking Wi-fi License Fees?

Jherico Re:"Buddy Network" (347 comments)

He got a threatening letter from a law firm, not a summons. If they brought an actual case against him you would be correct that ignoring it would be stupid, but ignoring asshat extortion lawyergrams is a perfectly legitimate tactic.

about a year and a half ago
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Perl's Glory Days Are Behind It, But It Isn't Going Anywhere

Jherico Re:Wait, what? (379 comments)

Defining and using the regex inline is a bug, not a feature. It typically means you're putting regex literals into the code, which is just as bad as peppering your code with hard-coded constants.

about a year and a half ago
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Why Ray Kurzweil's Google Project May Be Doomed To Fail

Jherico Re:Ah! (354 comments)

I hope Kurzweil succeeds simply so that we can assign the resulting AI the task of arguing with these critics about whether it's experience of consciousness is any more or less valid than theirs. It probably won't shut them up, but it might allow the rest of us to get some real work done.

about a year ago
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How Do YOU Establish a Secure Computing Environment?

Jherico Re:Yes. (314 comments)

Excellent summation. A more concise version can be found here, from whnce this quote comes:

I am regularly asked what average Internet users can do to ensure their security. My first answer is usually, "Nothing--you're screwed."

about 2 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: Do Coding Standards Make a Difference?

Jherico Re:hmm (430 comments)

That's fine, but that means that you can't look at a reasonable diff prior to checkin, unless your diffing tools also do the inverse formatting on checking out the old version to diff against. This means every auto-formatting option has to be deterministic and reversible. It also means your code review tools have to support it. This quickly spirals into an every growing list of requirements that rapidly becomes much more onerous than simply following the fucking standard.

about a year ago
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Ask Slashdot: Do Coding Standards Make a Difference?

Jherico Re:Learn your tools. (430 comments)

I imagine what the original poster was hoping for was something along the lines of tools that magically converted to and from the 'standard' convention to his local standard so that he can ignore the global standard. Unfortunately this isn't really feasible given the number of items in the typically development toolchain that would have to support this functionality.

about a year ago
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Ask Slashdot: Do Coding Standards Make a Difference?

Jherico Fix your damn tools (430 comments)

As a result, I've [wasted] hundreds of hours in code reviews because [I couldn't follow instructions]

FTFY.

about a year ago
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Misunderstanding of Prior Art May Have Led to Apple-Samsung Verdict

Jherico Re:Que the False Narratives (503 comments)

You're not countering my point. You're just being an asshole. My examples weren't meant to be illustrative, not definitive. Also, that is a suppressor, not a silencer. There is no gun you can shoot that makes a 'phut' noise and won't draw the attention of everyone in a 20 meter radius.

Yeah, a lot of people have misconceptions, which is often why there are expert witnesses to clarify issues that aren't commonly in the general body of knowledge. However, that doesn't mean that any knowledge not gleaned from an expert witness is forbidden.

more than 2 years ago

Submissions

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Google Maps adds 'questing' layer

Jherico Jherico writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Jherico writes "Google Maps has added an 8-Bit retro 'Quest' layer to their maps website. Sayeth the blog: "In our pursuit of new digital frontiers, we realized that we may have left behind a large number of users who couldn't access Google Maps on their classic hardware. Surprisingly, the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) was unsupported, despite its tremendous popularity with over 60 million units sold worldwide.""
Link to Original Source
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1 MW LENR plant supposedly to come online tommorow

Jherico Jherico writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Jherico writes "Andrea Rossi (covered here a few times before) is scheduled to bring his 1MW plant online tomorrow. This will likely either be the point where 'unexpected technical difficulties' unmask this for the scam it is, or the presence of an actual 1MW plant with no chemical fuel source will silence a lot of skeptics. What would you do if it were real?"
Link to Original Source
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Netflix offers second price hike in 6 months

Jherico Jherico writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Jherico writes "Having added a $1 surcharge for blu-ray access in October, Netflix has decided the best way to deal with the recession is to raise the price again.

As we buy more, you are able to choose from a rapidly expanding selection of Blu-ray titles. And as you've probably heard, Blu-ray discs are substantially more expensive than standard definition DVDs — often as much as 30% more. We're committed to providing a high quality Blu-ray experience for our members who choose to add Blu-ray access, and in order to do that we need to adjust Blu-ray pricing. As a result, the monthly charge for Blu-ray access is increasing for most plans and will now vary by plan.

The new pricing is essentially $1 per slot in your plan, plus $1 for the account, i.e. $6 for a 5-at-a-time plan. Customer response has been immediate and venemous."

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