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Microsoft To Open Source .NET and Take It Cross-Platform

Joey Vegetables Re:Perfect Linux Application for .NET (525 comments)

OK, yes, but don't worry. It will be split into 4,212 different assemblies (although each will depend on all of the others). :)

about two weeks ago
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NY Doctor Recently Back From West Africa Tests Positive For Ebola

Joey Vegetables Re:Responses: for New York etc (372 comments)

But then Big Pharma doesn't profit. Therefore, it won't happen. A better idea IMO: dose *yourself* with appropriate amounts of these nutrients (I'd say much more than the current RDA, which is useless, but still less than you suggested, only because that much C would be prohibitively expensive and that much D could be toxic over long periods of time; 1-5g of C and 4800IU of D should suffice in a person not already sick). On top of a proper diet including lots of green leafy veggies, fresh fruits, and as little other sugar or high-glycemic carbs as possible. And start now. Odds are you will be much more resistant to any viral infection, and will defeat it much more easily should it happen anyway.

about a month ago
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Ubuntu Turns 10

Joey Vegetables Re:Happy Birthday (110 comments)

Don't hold back dude. Tell us how you really feel.

about a month ago
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Soda Pop Damages Your Cells' Telomeres

Joey Vegetables Re:Cumulative? How about other quantities? (422 comments)

For most people it probably will. I was not so fortunate, at least not yet. My research leads me to believe that in as extreme a case as mine, there is a lot of arterial damage already, and BP won't come down much until that is reversed. I will say that my cardio endurance has improved a great deal . . . I went from not being able to walk a mile without pain, to being able to run 4, albeit at a fairly gentle pace (13-15 minute miles), in just under 2 months, although since that time I keep injuring my calf, rendering me unable to run although I still walk and bike an hour a day when possible. So my heart, liver, and kidneys are probably still serviceable, but I'll need time for the arteries to become more flexible. Interval training is said to be better for this purpose than pure cardio, and I'm looking into how I can do some without continually re-injuring my legs.

about a month ago
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Soda Pop Damages Your Cells' Telomeres

Joey Vegetables Re:Overly broad? (422 comments)

HFCS is indeed broken down more rapidly which likely accounts for much of the difference, for the same reasons that high-glycemic carbs cause more damage than the same amount of low-glycemic carbs. Sugars follow different metabolic pathways when too much are consumed in too short a period of time. But, in addition, there are several other concerns regarding HFCS: (a) It is often contaminated with heavy metals, which damage the body in similar ways as fructose itself (and more - they are generally neurotoxic as well). (b) It contains large traces of the enxymes used in its manufacture, which have the nice effect of breaking down other carbs into sugars early in the digestive process. (c) It does not need to be broken down into fructose and glucose, as does sucrose, which is most of why it is absorbed more rapidly. And (d) because it is cheaper it is used in much greater quantities than sugar.

about a month ago
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Soda Pop Damages Your Cells' Telomeres

Joey Vegetables Re:Cumulative? How about other quantities? (422 comments)

Me too, through much of my 20s and 30s. (Not MD . . Pepsi . . but metabolically basically the same thing.) Then I had a family, and needed life insurance, and couldn't get it, because of metabolic syndrome (obesity, high blood pressure, high blood glucose, the whole works). I decided, this past summer, to make what I hope will be permanent lifestyle changes to try to reverse this damage. I'm now mostly soda-free, HFCS-free, still addicted to some other sweets (and other high-glycemic carbs which are almost as bad), but working on it. Trying to exercise more and to eat mostly nutrient-dense rather than calorie-dense foods. I look and feel better already, but BP and other numbers are still bad. I expect to have to lose much of the fat I gained before they improve enough for me to represent a decent risk to a life insurance company, and, by then, I may well be in my mid-50s, so it will still be expensive, but it will be possible. I wish I could go back in time and change this nasty habit, perhaps by educating myself better about what it would ultimately entail, not just for me but much more importantly for the people I love. You may very well have some manifestations of metabolic syndrome, not all of which are outwardly apparent. If you have access to decent healthcare, get yourself checked out, even if you feel and look otherwise healthy. But be aware that most doctors will want to prescribe drugs, which will treat some of the symptoms but possibly at the expense of causing or exacerbating others. What you really want instead is to eliminate the cause, which most nutritionists believe to be consumption of sugars and high-glycemic carbs, which trigger insulin and leptin surges, resistance to these and other hunger-related hormones over time, and a positive feedback loop eventually leading to high blood pressure, heart and artery disease, diabetes, obesity, and a high risk of death from stroke, heart attack, or renal failure. Most people who have not yet been hospitalized for one or more of these ailments - and even some who have - have been able to reverse them through proper nutrition and exercise.

about a month ago
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Former Department of Defense Chief Expects "30 Year War"

Joey Vegetables Re:And some say Obama isn't a Republican (425 comments)

The beauty of the system you just described is that it paints not just "opposing" authoritarians, but those of us who are more liberty-minded as well, as the enemy. Of both sides. It is perhaps the most demonically clever system of social control ever devised. It can tolerate a certain amount of dissent, which is why people like you and me are still alive. It knows that even if a few people discover that they are in a Matrix, they are very unlikely to ever convince enough others to matter. Now, let's see if it can handle the combination of Ebola plus a billion or so people who actually live out their faith, as opposed to simply using it as an excuse to live as they please. My guess is that it can't. Of course, even if it did, any system of tyranny always contains the seeds of its own destruction. Betting on the long-term survival of this wicked world empire would be an extremely bad bet, although it will likely still do a lot of damage before it finally goes away.

about a month ago
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Former Department of Defense Chief Expects "30 Year War"

Joey Vegetables Re:You Forgot One (425 comments)

Not half. A tiny, tiny minority. However, I would be honored to be among that minority. There would be no doubt left at that point that anything that hurt the rogue U.S. regime would help the U.S. people (whom I have sworn an oath to defend against any enemy, foreign OR DOMESTIC) as well as the people of the entire world, and I will consider it an honor, if need be, to give my life in service of that oath. BTW, I also will happily give my life, if need be, to protect my Muslim neighbors or innocent Muslims elsewhere, even though I do not share their faith, culture, or heritage. They are good, peaceable, hospitable neighbors; they have done nothing to wrong me, and our disagreement is not sufficient reason for me to be able to justify taking their lives, whether directly, or through the same cowardly inaction that doomed so many Jewish people during the middle of the previous century.

about a month ago
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David Cameron Says Brits Should Be Taught Imperial Measures

Joey Vegetables Science is not a popularity contest. (942 comments)

So anyone who disagrees with the OP "hasn't a clue about science." Wow. You could not ask for a better example of ignorance, arrogance, and projection, all at the same time. Yes, the metric system has numerous advantages over the imperial one, and yes, it would be much better for almost everyone if those remaining places that have not adopted it would do so. But to say that anyone who doesn't "hasn't a clue about science" says only that the OP hasn't a clue about science. It is a method of learning about the world and universe around us. It is NOT a priesthood. It is not a popularity contest. And it is not a fixed, unchanging, dogmatic body of conclusions, verified by a circle-jerk of industry- and government-funded "peer review." There will be far too little real science done until people, including even some people who unjustifiably fancy themselves to be "scientists," get this through their amazingly ignorant heads.

about a month and a half ago
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Low-Carb Diet Trumps Low-Fat Diet In Major New Study

Joey Vegetables Refutation (588 comments)

The study was badly flawed and does not support the conclusion in the headline.

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse...

I take no position on whether "low-fat" or "low-carb" is more stupid. They are both stupid. The body needs adequate amounts of both, and nutrients that are only available, or absorbable, in the presence of one or the other. While there are many unanswered questions in the science of nutrition, there is overwhelming evidence that nutrient-dense diets, all else being even close to equal, are ALWAYS superior to calorie-dense diets. In other words, avoid high-fat and high-carb diets and eat as much natural food, in as close to its natural state, as possible. Avoid refined junk. Exercise. If you are of color or live someplace other than the equator, supplement with vitamin D.

about 3 months ago
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The Evolution of Diet

Joey Vegetables Re:Keyword: Believe (281 comments)

I'll agree with you in large part. Not that it's a secret conspiracy, but rather a conspiracy hidden in plain view. Modern processed "food" is engineered to be addictive. It needs to be avoided insofar as possible. The approach I have become sold on, and am seeing good results with in my own life, is to go for a high nutrient-to-calorie ratio (also advocated by Dr. Joel Furhman and many other nutritionists). You avoid anything that is calorie-dense (sugars, most fats, and refined grains), fill your stomach with high-nutrient, low-calorie foods first (fruits, veggies, beans, nuts, seeds, etc.), and then eat reasonable portions of as much moderate-nutrient, moderate-calorie foods (UN-refined grains, starchy vegetables) as is consistent with your weight loss goals. Both bulk and calories are needed to trigger satiety, especially in people addicted to overeating, so this approach produces allows eating less, while getting more nutrients, and without feeling hungry all the time.

about 3 months ago
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Google's Driverless Cars Capable of Exceeding Speed Limit

Joey Vegetables Re:Why speed only a little? (475 comments)

Speed matters greatly in parts of the U.S. which are fairly spread out. Even here in northeast Ohio, which is not, at 120MPH, commuting to any of the 5 or 6 major cities closest to me (Detroit, Pittsburgh, Columbus, Erie, Buffalo) would be a realistic option. At 30-40MPH, it is not.

about 3 months ago
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Figuring Out Where To Live Using Math

Joey Vegetables Re:Check your arithmatic (214 comments)

Unfortunately, humidity is very high in the summer throughout most of the southeastern United States, including Atlanta.

about 3 months ago
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WHO Declares Ebola Outbreak An International Emergency

Joey Vegetables Re:Why is everything gotta do with Israel ? (183 comments)

So anyone not approving of the state of Israel shelling civilians is automatically a "Hamas fanboi"? That is the classic example of the fallacy of the excluded middle. People with any sense of compassion tend to be appalled at the suffering of innocent people regardless of their ethnicity, and people with any sense of history know that neither side is exclusively to blame.

about 3 months ago
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US Army To Transport American Ebola Victim To Atlanta Hospital From Liberia

Joey Vegetables Re:Thanks for the pointless scaremongering (409 comments)

They believe, as I do, and as does CAMA, the missions organization I more typically support , that it does little good to heal the body and ignore the soul. CAMA is already in the affected regions, already working with the victims. We personally know some of the people who are there full-time as well as others who've been on short-term missions trips, many of them with a medical component since most people in west and central Africa do not have regular access to medical care.

about 4 months ago
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US Army To Transport American Ebola Victim To Atlanta Hospital From Liberia

Joey Vegetables Re:Vaccine is coming (409 comments)

That is often the case, but it really depends on the pathogen. Because most viral illnesses are self-limiting . . . the immune system clears them up if it is working properly and if the patient doesn't die first . . . vaccination even after exposure may still make sense. For instance, rabies can usually be prevented or at least made non-fatal if the shots are given shortly after exposure. Generally, a vaccine will be effective if (a) it stimulates production of sufficient antibodies in sufficient time to prevent the pathogen from overwhelming the victim; and preferably (b) if the severity of the side effects are not significantly more damaging than the disease itself, which is the problem that many people, including me, have with childhood vaccinations, which prevent old strains of very mild diseases (at least compared to, say, Ebola or smallpox), but also contain potent toxins whose effects are known to be harmful.

about 4 months ago
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EU, South Korea Collaborate On Superfast 5G Standards

Joey Vegetables Re:It's gonna be funny when our cellphone Internet (78 comments)

Absolutely, in the U.S. where "laws" prevent competition. The results elsewhere will likely be better. Remember basic economics: in a market with enough buyers and sellers that none can exert inordinate influence on prices, those prices will tend toward the marginal cost of production. That doesn't happen here in the U.S. mainly because of regulatory capture - telecom regs are written by the telecom companies and are designed to hinder competition to the greatest extent possible.

about 5 months ago
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"Super Bananas" May Save Millions of Lives In Africa

Joey Vegetables Re:And hippies will protest it (396 comments)

While starvation is uncommon in the U.S., malnutrition, especially among the poorest (which would be the working poor - they are generally worse off than people on welfare), is not. It is damned-near universal among the children of the working class, as well as the children of those with substance abuse and/or mental health issues. Almost every family in my church - and most of us are at best lower-middle-class ourselves - helps to feed other kids in our neighborhoods. We mostly have access to cars and such, which children and the poorest adults don't, and to places one can buy food that is reasonably healthful and affordable, which most people in the inner city, regardless of income, can't unless they drive. Now, there are always things to eat . . but . . NOT necessarily healthy things. Not for the inner-city poor, the vast majority of them children.

about 5 months ago
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MIT Used Lobbying, Influence To Restore Nuclear Fusion Dream

Joey Vegetables Re:Falling funding: Why fusion stays 30 years away (135 comments)

Your argument appears to be "we haven't solve the technical and practical challenges yet, so we never will." Progress is disappointingly slow; I'll give you that. The challenges are hard. I'll give you that too. However, given what human ingenuity has managed to accomplish just in the past 20 years, I think it is a very, very poor strategy to bet against it in the long term. Part of why we're not solving these challenges is that we're frankly not trying that hard. What we have now is still good enough for now. When that changes, when sufficiently larger players start taking fusion research seriously, I think the game will change pretty dramatically.

about 5 months ago
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MIT Used Lobbying, Influence To Restore Nuclear Fusion Dream

Joey Vegetables Re:Article doesn't go into details about quality (135 comments)

A lot of wisdom I do agree with. Regarding the storage problem - which I also agree to be the main bottleneck toward adoption of cleaner energy: why not use that energy at the point of production, to crack other hydrocarbons (biomass, corn husks, dirty coal, other carbon-rich waste), into liquid fuels using that energy, and store/transport these liquid fuels to the point where they will be used? I realize the process is not yet optimally efficient and not quite carbon-neutral, but it seems to me no worse and in many incremental ways better, than our current strategy of "burn whatever, just tax the crap out of it so we can bomb more brown people."

about 5 months ago

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Joey Vegetables hasn't submitted any stories.

Journals

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Joey Vegetables Joey Vegetables writes  |  more than 11 years ago

Te sakam Iskra!

(that means I love you Iskra, in Macedonian, her language, which I hope someday I'll be smart enough to learn.)

Iskra is my sweetheart, friend, and future wife.

There are no words in any language to express the love I have for her, much less the love she truly deserves.

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July 4; Government=God? :(

Joey Vegetables Joey Vegetables writes  |  more than 11 years ago

It's the 4th of July. I'm supposed to be "patriotic." Blah.

I love God, my family and friends, and all people of good will.

I want to love my country too. I really do. And I once did - look at my Usenet postings if you don't believe me.

But true patriotism requires me to say that while I love what my country once stood for, and even much of what it claims to stand for today - I do not love our "government" and I will never understand why people support or encourage or even tolerate it.

July 4 was once sacred to us precisely because we threw off a foreign occupying "government" that was oppressive and tyrannical by the standards of its day.

But I would welcome King George back with open arms if his tyranny were the worst I ever had to see.

Why, oh why, do people believe every @&!@$# think that the !*@$@$ so-called "government" tells them?

Government: "It's illegal to copy MP3s." So people think it's illegal.

Government: "It's illegal to ingest chemicals we don't like / don't control / profit from artificially restricting supply of / whatever." So people think it's illegal.

Government: "It's illegal to own guns for self-defense, or for defense against a tyranical government (which, of course, we will NEVER become)." So people think it's illegal, and let strangers rob, enslave, rape, and murder their supposedly "loved" ones.

Government: "It's OK to butcher your unborn baby." So people think it's OK. It isn't (hint: read the 5th and 14th Amendments. better hint: THOU SHALT NOT KILL.)

Government: "It's OK to butcher millions of Iraqis/Serbs/Afghanis/Iranians/whatever (through depleted uranium, 'sanctions', cluster bombs, low-yield nukes, whatever)." See above.

The CONSTITUTION is the highest law of the land, folks. So-called "laws" contrary to it are null and void.

My theory: people need something or someone to worship. Hardly anyone around here believes in God, so they worship some level of government instead. How is this worship? Well, they obey it. They pay tithes to it. They consider its word law (whether it truly is or not). They defend it, even to the death. They allow it to do things that they know are unspeakably evil, all in the name of a "greater good."

I'm sick of it. God must be too. He wasn't too crazy about the politicians or religious leaders of Jesus' day.

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