Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Debian Talks About Systemd Once Again

JohnFen Re:Please let this be a good sign (516 comments)

For my own collection of systems, there's only one use that counts: that's me -- and this is a big deal for me. For my needs, both on my servers and workstations, systemd presents a lot of downsides and no upsides. Therefore, I reject it. I would prefer the relatively short-term pain of migrating my systems over the long-term pain of dealing with systemd -- but I rather that I could just continue to use Debian without having to use systemd at all.

3 days ago
top

Debian Talks About Systemd Once Again

JohnFen Re:Completely wrong (516 comments)

The summary is completely wrong. They are not discussing systemd, just whether packages can depend on a specific init system. I thought there was some kind of moderation here?

Yes, and this is really the key point. That there are packages that depend on systemd is the root problem -- it means that it's very difficult to use an init system other than systemd. If I could just select my preferred init system like I can select my preferred DE, then I wouldn't have an issue over systemd at all, since I could just avoid it entirely.

3 days ago
top

Debian Talks About Systemd Once Again

JohnFen Re:Remove It (516 comments)

Indeed. Which is why I hate Red Hat with a burning fire of a thousand suns. I stopped using Red Hat for my own systems many years ago, and I am greatly irritated that its influence is so hard to avoid.

3 days ago
top

Debian Talks About Systemd Once Again

JohnFen Re:Remove It (516 comments)

You can have your tamper-resistant logs right now, without systemd.

3 days ago
top

Debian Talks About Systemd Once Again

JohnFen Re:Hope! (516 comments)

In my mind, this comes down to whether we want a better functioning OS or an OS that adheres to the mindset that I think attracted many of us to Linux in the first place.

I don't think that systemd, on the whole, gives us a better functioning OS at all.

3 days ago
top

Debian Talks About Systemd Once Again

JohnFen Re:FORK DEBIAN! (516 comments)

It isn't developers or distro maintainers who hate systemd

I'm a developer and I hate systemd.

3 days ago
top

Debian Talks About Systemd Once Again

JohnFen Re:Some Sense Restored? (516 comments)

Yes, nondevelopers do use Linux on the desktop. I personally know 6 of them.

3 days ago
top

Debian Talks About Systemd Once Again

JohnFen Please let this be a good sign (516 comments)

The systemd problem will force me to stop using Debian, a prospect that I dread for a number of reasons (but mostly because changing all my servers and workstations will be a lot of work). Could it be that this is a sign I might not have to leave? Oh, please let it be so!

3 days ago
top

Android On Intel x86 Tablet Performance Explored: Things Are Improving

JohnFen Re:Why should I care? (97 comments)

Yes, this is a great point. I do care, but in the opposite way that Intel wants me to. Many of the apps I use are native, and all of the apps I write for Android are native. So, I doubt I will ever use an x86 based device. Unless there is some super-special advantage to what Intel is offering, the pain and impact of the change would be too much.

4 days ago
top

Android On Intel x86 Tablet Performance Explored: Things Are Improving

JohnFen Why should I care? (97 comments)

I couldn't care less what processor is in my phone or tablet. I only care if my phone or tablet can do what I want it to do. I suspect that I'm in the majority here. So, Intel, please explain to me why it matters whether my devices contain ARM or x86 architecture?

4 days ago
top

Millions of Voiceprints Quietly Being Harvested

JohnFen Re:When is enough enough? (86 comments)

Fortunately, they are very easy to permanently disable. At least for now.

5 days ago
top

Millions of Voiceprints Quietly Being Harvested

JohnFen Oh, great. (86 comments)

Now I have to use a voice scrambler for all my phone calls.

5 days ago
top

The Subtle Developer Exodus From the Mac App Store

JohnFen The app store (229 comments)

The app store lock-in is the primary reason why I won't ever own an iDevice.

5 days ago
top

Fighting the Culture of 'Worse Is Better'

JohnFen Re:Worse is Better doesn't mean that. (240 comments)

That's why apps now have functionality metrics (Firefox seems really big on it for example).

Are you talking about products looking at the functionality that people are using in the field to determine what features to drop or keep? If so, then these metrics are a bit of a plague today, since the assumption seems to be that you can determine how important a feature is by how often it's used. This results in very important, rarely used features getting dropped. (The obvious most recent example is the Windows start menu).

about a week ago
top

Fighting the Culture of 'Worse Is Better'

JohnFen Funny, coming from a UX guy (240 comments)

Judging by the output of the UX crowd over the past few years, they actually seem to believe that worse is better. It's kindof funny seeing him arguing against the proposition.

about a week ago
top

CSS Proposed 20 Years Ago Today

JohnFen Re:CSS is fine, devs are the bigger problem. (180 comments)

By that logic, everything sucks. C++, Haskell, HTML, all of it.

And yet, most of the code written in those languages results in a better track record than CSS. In fact, most professionally produced code that has problems fails in edge cases. Most the the CSS I encounter has problems in the main use cases.

sure, you can break things, but at least you'll usually get something that's still readable.

True, about 80% of the time when I have a problem with CSS-based pages, I can still sorta read the pages. Often I have to do annoying things like resize my browser, reduce my font sizes, or other types of workarounds before the page becomes readable, though, so that's sorta weak sauce. Nonetheless, there's still an annoying high rate of breakage -- I'd say about half of the websites I go to present some amount of functionality loss or unreadable text due to CSS.

But even worse than that, the limitations of CSS make web designers choose designs that are just bad (for instance, my own pet peeve of pages that have a fixed width or limited ability to handle arbitrary window sizes. Yes, you can do these properly with CSS, but it's much more difficult to do, so most web designers don't.

I'm not saying it's impossible to make a great, robust web page using CSS. I've done it. I am saying, however, that for nontrivial web pages it's much more difficult than making the equivalent page without it and it's much easier to mess it all up. In my view, that makes it a poor tool.

about two weeks ago
top

The CDC Is Carefully Controlling How Scared You Are About Ebola

JohnFen Re:What A Weapon (478 comments)

Sure, this is possible -- but if we're going to get that hysterical about the potential of ebola, then there are hundreds of other things we should be getting hysterical about first.

For the record, although there is some uncertainty about it, it appears that ebola may be able to exist for only a few hours outside the body (some studies say as long as a couple of days, though) on hard surfaces. It doesn't last more than a handful of minutes on soft surfaces such as fabrics.

about two weeks ago
top

The CDC Is Carefully Controlling How Scared You Are About Ebola

JohnFen Re:What A Weapon (478 comments)

Indeed it is. However, that's still a very poor method of transmission. Just getting infected fluids on your skin isn't enough for transmission to take place. The fluid has to enter a cut, abrasion, or mucous membrane.

about two weeks ago
top

CSS Proposed 20 Years Ago Today

JohnFen Re:CSS is fine, devs are the bigger problem. (180 comments)

I don't know. Given that most of the CSS-heavy sites I see routinely break or suck as a direct result of using CSS, its clear that most web developers don't know how to properly use it. And if, after 20 years, most developers don't know how to use a tool then I tend to think the fault is not the developers, the tool.

about two weeks ago
top

CSS Proposed 20 Years Ago Today

JohnFen Re:They _Should_ Replace It (180 comments)

The problem with tables is that they generally were very inflexible.

True, but this problem can be worked around by using dynamically generated web pages -- which brings an additional benefit of still separating layout from content, if you feel that's important.

Trying to resize your browser (back in the day) often caused strange layout issues (and lets not forget the 1px transparent GIFs).

A problem that CSS has not actually resolved, judging by the number of websites that become unusable when I make my browser window my preferred size.

about two weeks ago

Submissions

JohnFen hasn't submitted any stories.

Journals

JohnFen has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?