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It's Not Developers Slowing Things Down, It's the Process

JohnFen Re:Agile is supposed to fix these things (185 comments)

Yes, those are the ideals of agile. But I have never seen any of them successfully done in the real world. Instead agile as implemented (which never resembles the ideal) just makes everything worse.

about a week ago
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It's Not Developers Slowing Things Down, It's the Process

JohnFen Re:Constant Planning (185 comments)

Then fix it.

You say that as if its possible.

about a week ago
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It's Not Developers Slowing Things Down, It's the Process

JohnFen Re:Constant Planning (185 comments)

Good lord, I could not agree more. From what I've learned in the last three companies I worked for that used agile, agile means that an ungodly amount of time is spent in meetings and constant, meaningless record-keeping. God, I hate agile. It gets in the way of doing good, timely work.

about a week ago
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Debian Votes Against Mandating Non-systemd Compatibility

JohnFen Re:Debian OS is no longer of use to me now (575 comments)

Perhaps because that's not the most important part of the quote. Those are not big issues for Linus, but they may be big issues for VGPowerlord. I don't know. I do know that they are very big issues for me.

about a week ago
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Debian Votes Against Mandating Non-systemd Compatibility

JohnFen Re:Systemd works OK in Fedora (575 comments)

I'd doubt that Linux is alienating power users. What it is alienating is traditionalist system admins.

I know a lot of non-sysadmin Linux users who very alienated by this whole thing.

about a week ago
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Debian Votes Against Mandating Non-systemd Compatibility

JohnFen Re:No trust (575 comments)

Why is choice important to me? I would think the answer was self-evident: so I have the freedom to arrange my systems in any way I choose. This is the #1 problem that I'm having -- Debian, the distro that has built its reputation on the notions of choice and user benefit -- has effectively said that those notions aren't so important to them after all. So I can no longer trust Debian.

As to systemd in particular, I think the objections to it have been articulated pretty well, and many of them I agree with. There's little point in rehashing all that here, since my focus is not on whether or not systemd is a good thing but on the General Resolution.

factual errors (e.g., that it's monolithic, and therefore not UNIXy)

I don't think that's a factual error at all. I think it's accurate. The counterarguments really address things that are slightly different than the claim. For example, just because a system is distributed as a whole bunch of binaries doesn't mean that it's not monolithic or that it's "UNIXy".

I found Russ Allberry's analysis pretty compelling. Why do you disagree?

I did not. However, it's a bit difficult to engage in a point-by-point response here. My big picture take is that while the use of systemd has clear advantages to the people who must maintain the distros themselves (and to users of the OS in certain use cases), it does so at a cost to the users. For those of us that get no real benefit from systemd at all, this means that its inclusion is nothing but cost.

I'm really wondering what I'm missing here, because this seems like much ado about nothing, and I haven't been able to get anyone who is really concerned about it to explain why it's really a big problem.

I hope I was able to help. In short: the outrage is less about systemd in particular as it is about the fact that if nothing is done, systemd will be effectively required.

about a week ago
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Debian Votes Against Mandating Non-systemd Compatibility

JohnFen Re:Go back in time 5 years (575 comments)

I thus far have seen noone complain about the systemd part of systemd but only about the coupling between systemd and logind

I have seen people complain about it (I have complained about aspects of it myself), but perhaps the reason that these complaints aren't harped about endlessly is that the root problem is not systemd itself. It's that systemd is becoming impossible to do without if you want to do without it.

That's why the coupling issue you bring up is a big deal. And even there, it's not that issue in particular, is the general problem of its use becoming mandatory.

about a week ago
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Debian Votes Against Mandating Non-systemd Compatibility

JohnFen Re:Go back in time 5 years (575 comments)

If they would have done that, they would have found that systemd is just fine.

You assume far too much here. I've installed it, configured it, administered it. I don't want it. It isn't some magical artifact that you'll love if you just use it. It's a tool, and it can be appropriate for some cases and inappropriate for others. That's why the ability to choose whether or not to use it is so important, and that choice is what is going away. That's the entire complaint right there.

about a week ago
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Debian Votes Against Mandating Non-systemd Compatibility

JohnFen Re: Go back in time 5 years (575 comments)

It is more opaque and nonstandard.

However, the thing that makes it a dealbreaker for me is that it reduces the granularity and flexibility of the system. It absorbs far too many system services. If it were just an init manager, I'd have no real qualms with it. That it goes way beyond that, and important applications are beginning to require it, means that it signifies a huge shift away from the sort of system architecture that is the very reason I'm using GNU/Linux systems to begin with.

Since it's removing a real advantage of GNU/Linux systems without giving me any benefits that matter to me, its presence is an overall degradation of the OS.

If Debian had done the right thing and preserved user choice by creating a distro that realistically allows you to avoid using systemd, none of this would be a problem. That's why the failure of this GR is such a disaster: it's Debian voting against user choice.

about a week ago
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Debian Votes Against Mandating Non-systemd Compatibility

JohnFen No trust (575 comments)

With the failure of this GR, it is clear that I can not trust Debian to ensure that systemd remains optional. As such, I cannot trust Debian to remain a distro that meets my needs. It's all well and good that the dependency will remain avoidable in Jessie -- that gives me enough time to enact my escape plan to BSD with minimal disruption.

I am so saddened by this whole thing. I am even more saddened that a wonderful distro that has served me very well has stopped doing so. But, I suppose, times change.

about a week ago
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Carmakers Promise Not To Abuse Drivers' Privacy

JohnFen Re:Pinky swear? (98 comments)

The problem with the statement is that it doesn't really address my major privacy concerns at all. Even if they adhered to it 100%, there are enough exceptions that I don't care. It doesn't reassure me. My car simply should not be phoning home, period. It gives me zero benefit, and exposes me to risk.

about two weeks ago
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NSA Director Says Agency Shares Most, But Not All, Bugs It Finds

JohnFen Re:To what Standard? (170 comments)

i'm more worried about google knowing everything about me... or facebook.

Well then, you're in luck. You can avoid being spied on by the likes of Google and Facebook. You have no such choice about being spied on by the government.

about three weeks ago
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NSA Director Says Agency Shares Most, But Not All, Bugs It Finds

JohnFen Re:To what Standard? (170 comments)

To what standard do you hold the US government as opposed to other governments? You can be damn sure that every other intelligence agency is doing exactly the same thing... but you're criticizing NSA why exactly?

For two reasons: The NSA is part of my own government, and the other governments aren't, and the US government is in a position to cause me a lot more harm than other governments are. That other nations may be doing the same thing is irrelevant to the issue at hand. We cannot set our standards of freedom and liberty based on the global lowest common denominator.

about three weeks ago
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NSA Director Says Agency Shares Most, But Not All, Bugs It Finds

JohnFen Re:Positive spin (170 comments)

You made the claim. You back it up. That's how basic logic works.

Logic that the NSA director apparently feels doesn't apply to him.

about three weeks ago
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NSA Director Says Agency Shares Most, But Not All, Bugs It Finds

JohnFen Trust me (170 comments)

And why should we believe what Rogers says?

about three weeks ago
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Chinese Hackers Mess With Texas By Attacking Fracking Firms

JohnFen No sympathy (104 comments)

It's awfully hard to be sympathetic to companies that engage in or support fracking.

about three weeks ago
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Cutting the Cord? Time Warner Loses 184,000 TV Subscribers In One Quarter

JohnFen Re:abusive (392 comments)

They probably have no choice. In the area I live in (large metropolitan), my available broadband choices consist of Comcast, Comcast, or Comcast.

about a month ago
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Cutting the Cord? Time Warner Loses 184,000 TV Subscribers In One Quarter

JohnFen Re:They tried to raise prices 20% unnanounced (392 comments)

A lady at work the other day didn't seem to know that one could still receive over-the-air broadcasts for television. I wonder how many people don't realize this and are paying for TV that they don't want or need.

Since the digital switchover, there are a lot of people who can no longer receive OTA broadcasts at all, even in urban areas. The coverage of the digital broadcasts is very, very spotty.

about a month ago

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