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Comments

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I prefer my turkey ...

Just Some Guy Crock Potted (115 comments)

Step one: put barely-thawed turkey breast in crock pot.
Step two: turn it to medium and walk away for 8 hours
Step three: eat a ridiculously moist and tender bird

There are tastier methods, but the marginal gain per effort exerted isn't worth it to me.

yesterday
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Apple To Donate Profit Portion From Black Friday For AIDS Fight

Just Some Guy Re:AIDS is bad (102 comments)

I think you're really grasping at straws. Note that Apple is donating all of the proceeds to charity. It's kind of hard to make a profit in volume when you're losing money on each individual sale.

4 days ago
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Apple To Donate Profit Portion From Black Friday For AIDS Fight

Just Some Guy Re:AIDS is bad (102 comments)

Why would you get a tax writeoff for buying something? They're the one donating their part of the transaction, not you.

4 days ago
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Launching 2015: a New Certificate Authority To Encrypt the Entire Web

Just Some Guy Re:No thanks... (212 comments)

Given the parties involved, I don't. Mozilla Foundation and EFF are two groups I implicitly trust. That doesn't mean their proposal will be perfect, of course, but to me it means that their motives are good and that smart people are trying to do the right thing.

about two weeks ago
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Apple Disables Trim Support On 3rd Party SSDs In OS X

Just Some Guy Re:Ancient news (327 comments)

Apple should find a way to sign these

They did, at WWDC 2013. More to the point, I wonder why the Trim Enabler dev isn't signing his kext? Are there legitimate reasons, like he needs a special kind of thing that can't be signed using the provided tools, or is it because he doesn't want to pay for a dev license to sign the software he's selling? In a vacuum of information, there's not much point in speculating.

People replace HDDs in macs, they need to support it.

Why? Is TRIM empirically faster on your drive, or is this something you think you need?

about two weeks ago
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Apple Disables Trim Support On 3rd Party SSDs In OS X

Just Some Guy Re:Generic SATA storage devices don't support TRIM (327 comments)

I'm wondering about that myself. Early benchmarks showed that the 840 EVO benefits from TRIM, but that drive also had wonky firmware that was causing read degradation. Could the old firmware have accounted for some of the benchmark problems?

Side note: I applied the firmware upgrade myself last week and it went through without a hitch. YMMV, but I had an easy time of it.

about two weeks ago
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Apple Disables Trim Support On 3rd Party SSDs In OS X

Just Some Guy Re:Just to be clear... (327 comments)

Apple, for whatever dumb reason, has _never_ enabled Trim on non-Apple branded SSDs.

I don't work for Apple, but... Older MacBook Pros came with instructions for replacing the RAM and hard drive. This was considered a normal thing to do and didn't void warranties. For example, my 2011 MBP has normal Phillips screws on the bottom, and it takes me about two minutes to have the back panel off and the RAM and HDD snap right out.

SSDs have a history of notoriously horrible firmware. SandForce, anyone? Someone goes to Best Buy and comes home with a new SSD, pops it into their MBP, uses it for a month, and the thing asplodes and eats their data. They call Apple support to scream at them for writing a terrible OS that loses their data, and Apple loses money and reputation.

I can imagine perfectly non-nefarious reasons why Apple would disable TRIM by default and only enable it for drives that have been explicitly tested for compatibility. Even today, you can still turn TRIM on for yourself as you described, at the price of reverting to pre-Yosemite security. I haven't done so on the 840 EVO I swapped into my MBP because I've judged that it's not worth the tradeoff for me, but it's an option. Trim Enabler even has a GUI to do it for you.

I'd be hard pressed to come up with more of a manufactured controversy.

about two weeks ago
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Apple Disables Trim Support On 3rd Party SSDs In OS X

Just Some Guy Ancient news (327 comments)

Apple has never enabled TRIM on non-OEM SSDs, which is probably the conservative and correct thing to do. If you're clever enough to install a new SSD, you're clever enough to enable it on your own (and presumably to know whether you should enable it, and whether it's even a benefit for your particular drive).

The current workaround involved a single software vendor who didn't sign their kexts. Apple's new security policy won't let you load random unsigned kernel modules unless you explicitly turn off the signature checking. While this is inconvenient for me personally - because I have a 3rd-party SSD and I used that software myself - on whole, I'd rather have a more secure OS than the dubious benefit of a possibly slightly faster SSD.

about two weeks ago
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Microsoft Losing the School Markets To iPads and Chromebooks

Just Some Guy Re: Compromise combos don't work (219 comments)

A Surface Pro 3 starts at $749 - list price, less in qty. - that gets you close to 'good' laptops and tablets.

RT Surfaces go up against cheap Android tablets, not iPads or good high-end Androids. $449 is way more expensive than the competition.

At $749, you get a bottom-end CPU and no keyboard, so you're not competing against laptops at all. It's also $150 more than an iPad Air 2 with the same amount of storage (although the iPad will have more available space after subtracting the OS install), so you're paying more for a tablet with less available tablet-centric software.

OP was right: Surface is a hybrid that does neither thing well.

about two weeks ago
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Microsoft Losing the School Markets To iPads and Chromebooks

Just Some Guy Re:Microsoft losing to the school what? (219 comments)

And don't forget the alternate risks of mugging you're subjecting children to by having them carry around a $600 thief-magnet

While I don't disagree with your general point, theft rates started dropping as soon as Apple added Activation Lock to iOS 7. There's not a lot of street value in a device that can't be used, and they're not the thief magnet they were even a year ago.

about two weeks ago
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How 4H Is Helping Big Ag Take Over Africa

Just Some Guy Dihydrogen Monoxide. (377 comments)

because hybrid seeds are bred for intensive agriculture, they typically need chemicals to thrive

...unlike natural, free-range grains that are invulnerable to pests and thrive under the gentle light of the waxing crescent moon. Sorry, but you lost me at "chemicals". Yes. They're matter-based lifeforms, and need a whole slew of chemicals to exist.

about two weeks ago
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AT&T To "Pause" Gigabit Internet Rollout Until Net Neutrality Is Settled

Just Some Guy Proof positive (308 comments)

Rephrased, AT&T just confirmed that their financial plans including deliberately breaking the would-be net neutrality rules. I mean, if they weren't, it wouldn't affect their plans at all.

about two weeks ago
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Duke: No Mercy For CS 201 Cheaters Who Don't Turn Selves In By Wednesday

Just Some Guy Re:type of assignment (320 comments)

At mine, it was specifically allowed. You absolutely weren't allowed to share work unless explicitly told otherwise, but discussing your approach and debating the benefits was considered a legitimate learning method.

about two weeks ago
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Duke: No Mercy For CS 201 Cheaters Who Don't Turn Selves In By Wednesday

Just Some Guy Re:type of assignment (320 comments)

Undoubtedly. Side note: yet another reason why it's good to get to know your teachers before you're counting on them to have a good impression of you.

about two weeks ago
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Duke: No Mercy For CS 201 Cheaters Who Don't Turn Selves In By Wednesday

Just Some Guy Re:Is it cheating? In CS classes, yes it is (320 comments)

The problem isn't necessarily that code was copied directly from the Internet

It might be as simple as that. If the syllabus said "do your own work" and they didn't, then it's cheating. If your calc teacher says "I expect you to do the arithmetic by hand" and you use a calculator, then you're cheating. A classroom is a tiny little environment with its own rules, and violating those rules (even if they seem silly or outdated by those who don't understand them) isn't generally tolerated well.

about two weeks ago
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Duke: No Mercy For CS 201 Cheaters Who Don't Turn Selves In By Wednesday

Just Some Guy Re:The Internet Is The Way We All Do It. (320 comments)

In a way, using the internet to get the answer is the way it works in IT these days.

Speak for yourself. I don't copy stuff off the Internet because I'm making new things and don't have anyone to copy from. I'd change careers tomorrow if I had a job where copy-and-pasting was the order of the day.

That's assuming you weren't talking about downloading modules to do routine stuff. Sure, I'll use someone else's HTTP request library instead of rolling my own.

about two weeks ago
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Duke: No Mercy For CS 201 Cheaters Who Don't Turn Selves In By Wednesday

Just Some Guy Re:type of assignment (320 comments)

I've told this story before, but... why not. I used to do my homework with my buddy. We would not copy each other's stuff, but we'd bounce ideas around: "hmm, this problem sort of looks like this thing", and "I'm trying to decide between these two data structures". That kind of stuff. You know, actually learning by thinking things through out loud and considering alternatives.

We had one class with an archetypically CompSci homework assignment, like "simulate a telephone switchboard with M operators, N callers, and X extensions". We each started off with boilerplate like "int operators, callers, extensions", etc., and went from there. When we were finished, we had written the exact same program. I mean, same variables, same functions, same indentation, everything. Probably not surprising given that we'd been doing this for a couple of years by that point, but still.

Fortunately, we had an awesome professor who knew both of us well. He called us each in separately (without saying why) to ask us how our program worked, why we'd made the design choices, and so on - basically interrogating us to see whether we'd actually done the work ourselves. Then he brought us in together, showed us each other's assignments, and watched us stammer in confused terror before he broke down laughing.

That could have gone very, very badly. We didn't cheat in any sense of the word, but it definitely would have looked like it to anyone else.

about two weeks ago
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LibraryBox is an Open Source Server That Runs on Low-Cost Hardware (Video)

Just Some Guy Re:Justify my love (47 comments)

Like maybe a kind of mesh network/anonymous proxy capability or some kind of distributed file system where you could subscribe or publish content that would get automatically replicated between devices when they came in range of each other. Maybe some kind of messaging/bulletin board communications.

Ooh, like a cross between Freenet and FidoNet? I'm in. I don't know that this is the right software, but PirateBox shows a lot of potential and runs on the same hardware.

about three weeks ago
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LibraryBox is an Open Source Server That Runs on Low-Cost Hardware (Video)

Just Some Guy Re:Justify my love (47 comments)

To clarify: I want to buy my own $35 hardware and install the downloadable firmware on it, not pay a 300% markup for someone else to do it for me. The project itself looks neat, not the commercial product itself.

about three weeks ago
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LibraryBox is an Open Source Server That Runs on Low-Cost Hardware (Video)

Just Some Guy Justify my love (47 comments)

Why do I need one of these? Seriously, I want one, and I could buy the hardware off Amazon for $35 and download an installer for free to make my own. I just can't think of a single legitimate reason why I should have one beyond "it's really neat". Help me, geek brethren and sisthren: why do I need to buy and set one of these up?

about three weeks ago

Submissions

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SCO On The Ropes

Just Some Guy Just Some Guy writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Just Some Guy writes "The SCO Group just published their SEC Form 10-Q Quarterly Report for July 31, 2007. In summary, they really needed a victory over Novell that didn't come. In their own words, "[as] a result of both the Court's August 10, 2007 ruling and our entry into Chapter 11, there is substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern." Other highlights include:

Revenue from the UNIX business decreased by $2,704,000, or 37%, for the three months ended July 31, 2007 compared to the three months ended July 31, 2006 [...]


and:

Revenue from our SCOsource business decreased from $31,000 for the three months ended July 31, 2006 to $0 for the three months ended July 31, 2007.


Are we close to the end of the saga?"
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SCO No Mo'

Just Some Guy Just Some Guy writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Just Some Guy writes "The other shoe has dropped; SCO has filed for bankruptcy. From their press release: "The Board of Directors of The SCO Group have unanimously determined that Chapter 11 reorganization is in the best long-term interest of SCO and its subsidiaries, as well as its customers, shareholders, and employees."

Although they "want to assure [their] customers and partners that they can continue to rely on SCO products, support and services for their business critical operations," they later go on to say that "SCO owns the core UNIX operating system", contrary to findings in the SCO v. Novell court case. It's not advisable to take their words at face value."

Link to Original Source

Journals

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PyCon 2011

Just Some Guy Just Some Guy writes  |  more than 3 years ago

I am in Atlanta for PyCon, and you're on Slashdot reading about it. So there. Neener neener neener.

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I think they're trying to kill Slashdot.

Just Some Guy Just Some Guy writes  |  more than 6 years ago

I seriously believe that someone is trying to sabotage Slashdot by making it decreasingly pleasant.

Exhibit A: the new-and-busted discussion system. I actually like it more than the old way for reading comments, but for writing comments it's almost maliciously bad. The new system's preview button is much slower than the old way, and the mandatory waiting time between posting comments is a lot longer than it used to be. The net result is that whenever you're eventually allowed to click the "Submit" button, if your comment doesn't go through immediately, you're stuck staring at a pink error message until the countdown is finished. The only thing keeping this tolerable is that you can middle-click on "Reply to This" to open the old-style comment form in a new window, but I don't know if this workaround is going to be left in place long-term.

Exhibit B: Idle. This is truly the worst interface I've ever seen on Slashdot, from the painful color scheme to the tiny fonts to the difference between the markup used in comments between Idle and the rest of Slashdot. For example, the <quote> tags are treated like <p> in Idle, so there's no visible difference between text you're quoting and your own words. I don't even mind the content so much because it can be an amusing diversion, but wow, the implementation is just terrible.

No, I contend that the new changes are deliberately designed to drive away readership. I don't think that the Slashdot admins are incompetent, so I'm convinced that this is on purpose.

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Avoid the Ramada

Just Some Guy Just Some Guy writes  |  more than 6 years ago

This isn't tech-related in the least, but my family just got back from staying at the Ramada Inn in Kearney, Nebraska. It wasn't pretty.

Not that Kearney is a likely destination for Slashdotters, but for those who might find yourselves there: you've been warned.

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Tuning Slashdot, part 1: Relationship CSS

Just Some Guy Just Some Guy writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Refactoring relationships

Right now, relationships are embedded into the comments section of story pages with tags like:

<span class="zooicon"><a href="//science.slashdot.org/zoo.pl?op=check&amp;uid=198669"><img src="//images.slashdot.org/fof.gif" alt="Friend of a Friend" title="Friend of a Friend"></a></span>

This is ugly for a few reasons. First, it's a mess. Second, it means that every visitor has to have their own custom-rendered comments sections so you can't apply aggressive caching to the page-generation code. I would replace this with per-user CSS.

First, create a CSS file for each user like this:

/* Default class */
a.relationship {
background: url(neutral.gif);
width: 12px;
height: 12px;
display: inline-block;
text-decoration: none;
}

/* User-specific values start here: */

/* Friends */
a.user3352,a.user42 { background: url(friend.gif); }

/* Foes */
a.user666 { background: url(foe.gif); }

Next, replace the HTML in the comments section with generic relationship information such as:

<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="relationships.css">
[...]
<p>by neutral (1234) <a href="bar" class="user1234 relationship">&nbsp;</a> on 2008-01-20</p>
<p>by Just Some Guy (3352) <a href="bar" class="user3352 relationship">&nbsp;</a> on 2008-01-20</p>
<p>by foe (666) <a href="bar" class="user666 relationship">&nbsp;</a> on 2008-01-20</p>

All "a" tags with the "relationship" class get the default CSS values. If there is also a corresponding "user*" selector in the visitor's stylesheet, then the values in that selector override the defaults. For a sad user with no friends, this means that everyone gets the neutral.gif icon. As that user accumulates more specific relationships, those CSS definitions are applied instead.

This benefits Slashdot because suddenly they don't have to generate a brand new comments section for every visitor. The per-user CSS would also be extremely simple to generate. In any case, it would be no more difficult than the current method of embedding all that information directly into the comments section.

Finally, those CSS files could also be cached very easily. Since they would only change whenever a user's relationships are modified, Slashdot would no longer have to query that information every single time it creates a page.

There are two drawbacks to this idea. First, there are no more alt attributes on images, so users don't see a "Friend" popup if they hover over the relationship button. If that's a problem, replace the icons with little smiley or frowny faces as appropriate. Second, it would take slightly more work to support putting users in multiple categories at the same time ("Friend" + "Freak"). The fix is to create a whole set of graphics like "friend_freak.gif" and "foe_friendoffriend.gif" and corresponding CSS classes. There aren't that many categories, though, so it would require only minimal extra work to cover every possible combination.

How 'bout it, Taco - could you use something like that? Less code, less bandwidth, and less processing should be pretty easily reachable goals.

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Get over it, UbuntuDupe

Just Some Guy Just Some Guy writes  |  more than 6 years ago

UbuntuDupe screwed up an Ubuntu installation almost two years ago. He still hasn't gotten over it.

UD, let me give you some free advice: move on. Really. You don't even have to admit that you were wrong. Just stop yapping about it and move on.

Do you notice that every time you bring this up, everyone opposes you? It's not because we don't like you, but because even if you were in the right (which you weren't), after two years we simply don't want to hear it anymore. Stop embarrassing yourself and let it die already, OK?

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NSFW? Fark off.

Just Some Guy Just Some Guy writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Fark: Is read by your boss.
Slashdot: Is read by the weird guy in the server room.

Fark: Tries to be corporate friendly.
Slashdot: Links to Tubgirl.

Fark: Garfield.
Slashdot: Doonesbury.

Quit whining about "oh noes this is not teh NSFW!" If you want Fark, read Fark. This is Slashdot.

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I've been mod-bombed - yay!

Just Some Guy Just Some Guy writes  |  more than 8 years ago Within a five minute period yesterday, 5 of my comments got modded down with "-1: Troll". They were in different stories about completely different topics, but they were my most recent posts at that time.

I noticed that I've been building up a nice little list of liberal extremist freaks lately. It seems pretty clear to me that one of them happened upon some mod points and decided to spend them by modding me into oblivion.

I'm kind of flattered in a way, because they must have felt that I'm pretty important to spend their points against me. Even better, though, is this reminder that the favored tool of the liberal is silence. It's not enough to ignore opposing viewpoints, since someone else may hear them and be influenced. No, their response to someone who doesn't buy into their propaganda is to steal their voice.

On Slashdot, at least, they're limited to moderation. That's a lot better than in reality, when they'd probably scream "racist!", or "sexist!", or "capitalist!" in hopes that I'd run for shelter. That's not quite as funny.

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I Am Not This Serious. Seriously.

Just Some Guy Just Some Guy writes  |  more than 9 years ago I think I may have to take a break from Slashdot.

Why? Is is because it's eating into my work? Nah - I have plenty of long compiles that allow me to waste a few minutes here and there. Is it because I'm actually building a "Freaks" list? No way! The fact that some people find my honest opinions too insulting to bear is kind of amusing.

No, it's because I've started Acting My Age and becoming way, way too serious.

I am not at all like my Slashdot persona. I mean, my opinions and beliefs are the same - I've never once misrepresented those - but my personality is completely different. I'm a nice guy who likes to laugh, enjoy life, and have fun. I'm almost never this intense or serious in day-to-day life, but put me in front of a comment box and I go uber-professional and detail-oriented. Those are OK traits, sure, and it's nice to know that I'm capable of logical and serious discussion, but that's still not who I am.

I even get along brilliantly with people I disagree with. Although I'm a very staunch conservative, one of my long-time good friends is a deliberately homeless tree-hugger (I mean it - literally!) who's typically into paganism, environmentalism, socialism, and a lot of other isms that I don't really want any part of. We get along great, though, and although we disagree on pretty much everything we always have a fun time in the process. Not here, though. Oh, no. For some reason, I seem to lose the ability to parse gentle sarcasm when I come here and just have to respond in a pedantically exact manner.

So, why is that? I kind of blame Slashdot itself, and its "coverage" of the 2004 elections in particular. Despite our differences, we used to all pretty much get along before then. Now our little green corner of the 'net is hyper-politicized and angry, and you can't ask for a recommendation of a nice IDE drive without being lectured about the evils of magnetoresistive manufacturers and their harm to the third-world environment.

I'll make you a promise: if you promise to lighten up and begin enjoying the humor inherent in a population of nearly a million crotchety geeks from across the world, I'll do the same. In fact, as a token of good faith, I'll be the first to try. On the other hand, if I can't pull it off, then I'm out of here. Seriously. I enjoy life too much to be sucked down into a swirling pit of Seriousness and Thoughtful Deliberation.

Let's have fun again, shall we? Wish me luck.

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Why you're my foe

Just Some Guy Just Some Guy writes  |  more than 10 years ago I use my "Foes" list to manage the people who've established a pattern of saying things far beyond my threshold of tolerable stupidity. It's not that I dislike these people personally but that they detract from intelligent conversation to the point that they make themselves a nuisance. I'm not going to spend mod points to silence them, because that goes against my principals (and because I'd rather reward good conversation than attempt to "punish" the bad), but I personally have no interest in what they have to say and don't want to be bothered with it.

So, I think it's only fair to tell people why I've added them to the list. I'm not going to bother with prior entries, but I will be explaining all new ones.

The first recent addition is killjoe. I've disagreed with some of his postings, but this quote is what pushed him from "people I sometimes disagree with" to "people I don't want to listen to":

As for me I think the days of the peaceful liberals are over. It's time we adopted the republitard tactics. Yes that means dragging them behind cars and crucifiying them alongside the highways.

As far as I'm concerned, people who make comments like that are ineligible for civil conversation.

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Authenticated anonymity on Slashdot

Just Some Guy Just Some Guy writes  |  more than 10 years ago

Want to post anonymously but verifiably? That is, do you want to be able to say things that you don't want traceable back to yourself, but you do want interested parties to be able to verify that multiple posts originate from the same person?

Right now, Anonymous Coward (AC) posts are stored without any identifying information. This means that while you may divulge some important information, another person can reply to your post, claiming to be you, and contradict your statements. Example:

You: I have proof that my company is making toxic waste.

Reply from twit: And no matter what you hear, I was not fired from my last job for making false accusations!

With common software, this is almost trivially easy. The idea is to post as an AC but always sign your messages with the same GPG ID. The advantage is that you can still be an AC when it's important, but interested observers can verify whether other a given set of posts come from you.

If you want do this, here's how:

  1. Generate a GPG key.
  2. Submit your key to a public keyserver.
  3. Write your Slashdot text in an external editor.
  4. Sign the post with your "anonymous" key.
  5. Use <ecode> tags to encapsulate your signed message.
  6. For added obscurity, add "no-version" to you gpg.conf file. If you're using GPG on Linux, that string may not narrow the field of candidates too much. If you hand-compiled it on your TI-85 calculator, and you've explained to your boss in great detail how cool it is to run crypto on your calculator, then it may reveal more information than you want.
  7. Be sure to click the "Post Anonymously" checkbox!

Now people interested in such things can verify that all of your posts originate from the same person, even though they can't determine who that person is.

This isn't exactly a brilliant invention on my part; all of the pieces already existed in usable form. However, I've never seen anyone actually do this, and I thought it might be a useful idea for someone.

Caveats:

  • Assume that your IP is logged by Slashdot and the public keyserver and available to whomever you're trying to hide from by posting as an Anonymous Coward.
  • Be darn sure that you remember to check the "Post Anonymously" box or your cover is definitely blown in a big way; the people you're hiding from can now trace a whole batch of incriminating posts back to you. For example, when I first tested the idea, I made that mistake and forever ruined a key with a clever name (IMHO).
  • This method can't prove that a post did not come from you. In the example above where an anonymous twit is trying to negate your statements, your best course of action is to post a signed reply to him stating that the reply post was not from you.

A Note To Slashdot Editors

I'm not writing this to be a pain in the butt, honest - this seems like a legitimate need that I think needed to be addressed. This specific implemention relies on the idea of <ecode> tags keeping the contents in pristine condition. If people start using this, please don't change ecode's functionality so that old signed posts are broken.

A giant extra helping of karma to the authors if you add code to detect signed messages, keep a list of key IDs that've been used, assign a serial number to each one, and print that serial number in the message header of each signed message. Then, casual visitors could see that a string of messages were all signed by "Slashdot authed AC #243", although responsibilty for actual verification would still lie with interested end-users.

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Ditch "Overrated" already!

Just Some Guy Just Some Guy writes  |  more than 11 years ago Would-be moderators, get this through your head: "Overrated" should almost never be used! If you think that something moderated as "Funny" isn't very humorous, then accept that other people enjoyed it and move on. If something is marked "Insightful" but you don't agree with it, then move on. Get the point?

I always kill "Overrated" in meta-moderation. Always. Keep that in mind, would you?

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