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Vintage 1960s Era Film Shows IRS Defending Its Use of Computers

K. S. Kyosuke Re:Uproar? (141 comments)

Obviously, the script writers weren't programmers! Or at least group theorists.

3 hours ago
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The Dismal State of SATCOM Security

K. S. Kyosuke Re:Encryption (47 comments)

Be a contrarian - go for Type i encryption devices!

5 hours ago
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Vintage 1960s Era Film Shows IRS Defending Its Use of Computers

K. S. Kyosuke Re:Uproar? (141 comments)

That makes me wonder...if I'm already putting my heart and my soul into my work, is that tax-deductible?

10 hours ago
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Vintage 1960s Era Film Shows IRS Defending Its Use of Computers

K. S. Kyosuke Re:Uproar? (141 comments)

Were people afraid the computers would make mistakes and overcharge them or what?

They were afraid that the computer will send them a bill asking them to either pay $0.00 or to go directly to jail.

12 hours ago
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GoPro Project Claims Technology Is Making People Lose Empathy For Homeless

K. S. Kyosuke Re:Spare Change (305 comments)

Hasn't marijuana been proven to be significantly less of a life destroyer (in terms of addictivity and physiological damage) than alcohol?

yesterday
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Code Quality: Open Source vs. Proprietary

K. S. Kyosuke Re:Not a surprise (122 comments)

It's called stochastic sampling. There are "never enough" stochastic samples if you want to get to zero error, but given an arbitrary acceptable error, there are usually acceptable sample numbers and sampling strategies.

yesterday
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Survey: 56 Percent of US Developers Expect To Become Millionaires

K. S. Kyosuke Re:wait, what? (441 comments)

They lie, lie and lie some more.

Are you implying they made the wrong career choice and should have gone for statistician jobs instead?

yesterday
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'Thermoelectrics' Could One Day Power Cars

K. S. Kyosuke Re:Ah, the clickbait (151 comments)

A salt made of Selenium and Tin.

Apparently, the author is a lunatic from some tinpot university.

yesterday
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Lavabit Loses Contempt Appeal

K. S. Kyosuke Re:The Real Cost (121 comments)

Well, that's why you have to decentralize! Let them deal with millions of individual users instead.

yesterday
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Retired SCOTUS Justice Wants To 'Fix' the Second Amendment

K. S. Kyosuke Re:"Ignoring the traditional definition of the ter (1408 comments)

As the Second Amendment does not make distinction between different types of armaments, no, I do not mean firearms, I mean weapons.

So I guess that, as per second amendment, private ownership of land mines, sarin bombs, nukes etc. are all perfectly fine? Even if it would violate international treaties? I didn't know that. I guess there actually is a line somewhere there no matter how underspecified the second amendment is.

Not being able to serve active duty in the official military is not the same thing as being "unfit" to protect your homeland from tyranny and invasion; for example, while losing a leg above the kneecap might disqualify you from Selective Service, it by no means diminishes your ability to hold a position and fire a weapon.

Agreed. But I wasn't arguing that the criteria should be the same for both. It's just that the term "disabled" is too broad for both purposes - as it covers both people who should and shouldn't be given weapons (missing a foot vs. being mentally handicapped, for example), both "disabled people should be denied weapons" and "disabled people shouldn't be denied weapons" are irrational opinions unless further elaborated what "disabled" means. Of course "he doesn't think that disabled people should have access to weapons", since the opposite would be dangerous. And he probably doesn't think that disabled people shouldn't have access to weapons either. It's basic logic.

If you can't make a point without resorting to ad hominems, you don't have a point worth listening to

I haven't made any ad hominem. I'm just asking for sane reasoning. That's not an ad hominem, that's a call to put aside emotions and to use logic.

yesterday
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Retired SCOTUS Justice Wants To 'Fix' the Second Amendment

K. S. Kyosuke Re:Militia, then vs now (1408 comments)

So the five extra words of the proposed amendment can't hurt, now can they? ;-) If there's a process for it...

yesterday
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Retired SCOTUS Justice Wants To 'Fix' the Second Amendment

K. S. Kyosuke Re:Militia, then vs now (1408 comments)

the US had a few million people back then

...I'm feeling dumb today, too. :-)

yesterday
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Retired SCOTUS Justice Wants To 'Fix' the Second Amendment

K. S. Kyosuke Re:Militia, then vs now (1408 comments)

The world population of AD 1800 was about 10 million fewer people than the population of Mexico alone is today.

Uh, the world population in 1800 was almost one billion. Mexico has one billion people already?! No wonder all those Mexicans are willing to try to get into the US at any cost!

As far as I know, the US had a few billion people back then - mostly because it was still contained to the East Coast. So, those 50 marines sent to North Africa around 1800 would make something like 3000 marines today. Yet there were 100k soldiers in Iraq, there are 30k soldiers in Afghanistan... If you count in all the high-tech equipment, I still think that the regular forces back than were cheaper per capita, even if you account for lower economic productivity (especially given that this extra economic productivity that we got later is what gets deducted from people's income).

yesterday
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Retired SCOTUS Justice Wants To 'Fix' the Second Amendment

K. S. Kyosuke Re:"Ignoring the traditional definition of the ter (1408 comments)

So, either he's trying to redefine the term to mean "only those serving active duty in governmental military units," or he doesn't think disabled people should have access to weapons.

First, you probably meant firearms, not weapons. Second, the "active duty" thingy seems like nonsense to me - there's all kinds of reserve duties around the world, even in the US, isn't it? Why would he be against it? Third, if unfit people can't join the militia then why would that apply to them? (I'm not asking whether they should or shouldn't be allowed to be armed for any reason whatsoever - including self-defence, for example - just whether there's a non-wacko line of reasoning that leads from needing to keep militia to arming people who can't serve in it.)

yesterday
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Retired SCOTUS Justice Wants To 'Fix' the Second Amendment

K. S. Kyosuke Re:Swiss gun laws are nothing like the US (1408 comments)

Swiss gun laws are nothing like the US

Which I'm sure allows both parties to heave a sigh of relief! ;-)

yesterday
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Retired SCOTUS Justice Wants To 'Fix' the Second Amendment

K. S. Kyosuke Re:Militia, then vs now (1408 comments)

I'm not an expert at US history (obviously, being a European) but isn't it true that the taxation was vastly smaller back then, essentially meaning that whatever standing army or navy the US could have financed was incomparable to our day and age? If that's the case, it would make sense why they were so persistent about militia back then.

(Wikipedia says that in the First Barbary War, a whopping 54 Marines detachment partook in the fights, alongside the hundreds of crew of like twenty five ships or so, and all the hired mercenaries. The Battle of Derne - 10 Marines, 500 hired mercenaries...)

yesterday
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Retired SCOTUS Justice Wants To 'Fix' the Second Amendment

K. S. Kyosuke "Ignoring the traditional definition of the term"? (1408 comments)

I don't see how this is "ignoring the traditional definition of the term militia". Not wearing the militiaman hat all the time seems to be working for the Swiss just fine, BTW.

yesterday
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San Francisco's Housing Crisis Explained

K. S. Kyosuke Re:The bay area used to have affordable housing (347 comments)

making excuses for the bad behavior being "cultural"

Are you sure the word "excuses" is more applicable in this context than "explanations"? "Excuses" is not nearly the same thing. Especially serious sociological research tends to produce explanations rather then excuses - unless you're a Nazi or a communist getting the results you want.

yesterday
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52 Million Photos In FBI's Face Recognition Database By Next Year

K. S. Kyosuke Re:I grew a beard (108 comments)

Strawman. Didn't say it was. What AI is about, though, is Artificial Intelligence, and unless you know something no one else around here knows, there still isn't any. At all. Expert systems? Sure. Clever algorithms to solve specific problems? Yep. Dedicated hardware to mimic neurons? That too. Are these things artificial? They are. But are they, or do they incorporate, or do they evidence, intelligence? No. Not even. No way. There is no "field of AI."

You know, you've just demonstrated why many clueless people denigrate AI: whenever the field of AI solves some problem, that problem stops being considered an AI problem and spins out as a separate area with its own research and applications. Then, hordes of people like you shout "but they haven't found out anything useful yet!"

yesterday
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Lack of US Cybersecurity Across the Electric Grid

K. S. Kyosuke Re:Why is this crap on the internet (93 comments)

Do you want to build a separate redundant, self-routing network of switches, identifiers, and miles of cable for your company's network, when you can piggyback on the one that's already there?

You mean the wires that are already there? If only it were possible to use the power lines to transport a modest amount of control information...

2 days ago

Submissions

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Radio Contact Lost With Vostok Station

K. S. Kyosuke K. S. Kyosuke writes  |  more than 2 years ago

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) writes "Russian scientists at the Antarctic Vostok Station, who have been trying to dig into the liquid heart of Lake Vostok, have suddenly gone silent.

The conditions in the lake are presumed to be similar to those of Europa and Enceladus and there is a hope that previously unknown forms of life could have found a niche in this unusual environment. Despite having been warned that their drilling technology (using freon and kerosene to lubricate the bore hole) may not be up to the task of reaching the lake without harmful enviromental side-effects, the Russians have decided to go on with the drilling. They haven't been heard from for the past five days."
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HP releases AdvFS under GPL

K. S. Kyosuke K. S. Kyosuke writes  |  more than 5 years ago

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) writes "The battle for the "next-gen Linux file system" might have just become a little fiercer. Hewlett-Packard have just released their AdvFS file system under GPL. There is a press release on the HP web site, but the Wikipedia entry sports less PHB talk. The reaction of Sun and Oracle (each with their own advanced FS initiative, ZFS and Btrfs, respectively) to this might be interesting."
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