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Operation Wants To Mine 10% of All New Bitcoins

Karl Cocknozzle Re:I admire their spunk, but... (275 comments)

Yeah man totally. VISA and Mastercard won't be able to maintain their business model of processing transactions much longer.

Apples to zebras, my friend: VISA and MasterCard process transactions in hundreds of currencies. Even if one of those currencies (or even ten) were to simply become worthless it wouldn't really do any damage to them: They'd just figure out how to process Visa card transactions in the currency that replaced whatever disappeared.

Bitcoin processors are basically fucked. Maybe they can repurpose some of their uber-expensive GPU rigs to mine other currencies, too.... But maybe not.

I think it would be hysterical if, in three years, eBay had 10,000 auctions running for these overpriced "GPU in a box" rigs that were selling like hotcakes last year before the late-adopters figured out BitCoin wasn't really a workable currency.

about three weeks ago
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Operation Wants To Mine 10% of All New Bitcoins

Karl Cocknozzle Re:I admire their spunk, but... (275 comments)

When I see how much hardware and electricity is being wasted on these various mining processes, I can only shake my head.

I'm not sure when BTC is slated to have all of its coins mined, but it will be instructive to see what happens to it at that point.

Its value will plunge precipitously. There simply isn't enough money "processing transactions" for other people for a reasonable "business" to be run doing so, and that is all that would be left for "miners" once all the bitcoins are found. So "processors" will start disappearing almost immediately. This will in turn drastically reduce the ability to spend your bitcoins which will in turn demolish their "value."

All of that is to say "Dump them now, avoid the rush, maybe get some of your money back."

about three weeks ago
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Some Sites That Blue Coat Blocks Under "Pornography"

Karl Cocknozzle Re:Exploited sites? (119 comments)

Perhaps one or more of these sites were running expoitable software, and were hijacked to serve porn without their owners knowledge.

I know of at least one federal agency that had a poorly secured FTP server loaded with child porn back in to 90's

Perhaps, but most of these devices have a separate category for that (so you can run a report and quantify just how much "more secure" you are than if you'd stayed with your old product.)

about a month ago
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Pro-Vaccination Efforts May Be Scaring Wary Parents From Shots

Karl Cocknozzle Re:Solution - Face-saving way out (482 comments)

Mandatory? Fascism much?

Uh, no.

It isn't "fascism" to say your unvaccinated-child may not infect my too-young-to-be-vaccinated child with a preventable disease and risk his life/kill him. In general, your "freedom" to choose an activity end at the point that you're harming another person.

about a month and a half ago
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Pro-Vaccination Efforts May Be Scaring Wary Parents From Shots

Karl Cocknozzle Re:Solution - Face-saving way out (482 comments)

They also have a big messaging problem. When a person gets a polio vaccine the assumption is that they won't get polio. Yet every year these same people hear the newscasters saying that they should get a flu vaccine. The words don't mean the same thing to the public as they do to the researchers or the doctors. If they would clean up the language I suspect their success rates would improve.

We have a problem, but it is only partly the "messaging." The other part is the "population that can barely read at an aggregate 4th grade level" problem. Specifically, we live in a nation of morons that squeaks through high school with a minimal amount of required "hard-science" and can even get university degrees that require minimal or zero science education (Bachelor of Arts, anyone?) and can then consider themselves "educated" besides knowing neither jack nor shit beyond 12th grade science, and only having a passing familiarity with even that basic level of material.

Certainly if every newscaster mentioned, every time they mentioned flu vaccinations, that it was a vaccination for specific flus and that you can still get other flus, that might help. But if Americans weren't so fucking blidningly stupid when it comes to science, more of us would be able to imply such information by using our noodles.

about a month and a half ago
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Pro-Vaccination Efforts May Be Scaring Wary Parents From Shots

Karl Cocknozzle Re:Solution - Face-saving way out (482 comments)

However, the problem is that the school boards have also allowed exclusions for "religious or personal beliefs", which is a crock.

Exemptions for religious beliefs are a crock? Those are well supported in the case law. School boards allow them because the case law says they'll lose if they try to fight it in Court and most school districts don't have spare cash laying around to throw at lawyers.

Religious and personal beliefs are a crock in this situation. Specifically, your right to believe that vaccinations are a direct ejaculation from Satan's loins is one thing, but when your unvaccinated child goes to a park and spreads the disease to younger children, too young to be vaccinated, that's the point where their religious beliefs become irrelevant.

You have the right to believe anything you want--what you don't have the right to do is risk other peoples' lives for your beliefs.

about a month and a half ago
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Quebec Language Police Target Store Owner's Facebook Page

Karl Cocknozzle Re:French? Crazy Gibberish! (506 comments)

Professor Hubert Farnsworth: And this is my Universal Translator. Unfortunately, so far it only translates into an incomprehensible dead language.

Cubert J. Farnsworth: [into the translator's microphone] Hello.

Translator Machine: Bonjour!

Professor Hubert Farnsworth: Crazy gibberish!

Best. Throwaway. Shot. At. The. French. Ever.

Thanks!

about 2 months ago
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Quebec Language Police Target Store Owner's Facebook Page

Karl Cocknozzle French? Crazy Gibberish! (506 comments)

Why not translate it into a useful language, like Klingon?

about 2 months ago
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Woman Attacked In San Francisco Bar For Wearing Google Glass

Karl Cocknozzle Re:Not remotely a useful question (921 comments)

"...but you'll never in our lifetime get people "comfortable" with some creepy asshole filming them out in public. "
are you young? I can see many technologies in use today that would be seen as 'creepy' and never going to be accepted in the 70's.

People will get used to it, because people can get use to anything.

People might "get over" in broad strokes the concept of stationary security cameras, but I have a hard time believing we'll ever be "A-Okay" with roving glassholes filming everything, everywhere, including them. Consider: Still cameras have existed for 150+ years and to-this-day we have violent physical confrontations involving people who don't want to be photographed by creepy strangers on the street. I have a hard time believing a technology to make such rude and invasive behavior "normal" is going to work. Probably the early adopters will just keep getting beaten up until the fad ends and the next "revolutionary useless technology" comes along.

about 2 months ago
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Woman Attacked In San Francisco Bar For Wearing Google Glass

Karl Cocknozzle Not remotely a useful question (921 comments)

Given that much more hidden spy cameras are available for far less than the $1500 cost of Glass, what will it take for general acceptance to finally take hold?

Your question is nonsensical: Those people would likely be even more furious if they knew your clothes were covered in pinhole spy cameras.

The problem is people don't like having creepy strangers record them in public, regardless of whether they have the "right" to do so or not. The issue is the human discomfort and you might get to a point where people won't just kick your ass for looking at them while wearing Google Glass (or similar invasive, idiotic, and useless products) but you'll never in our lifetime get people "comfortable" with some creepy asshole filming them out in public. Nor will you ever get them comfortable with the perception that they're being recorded.

I wonder what the over/under on somebody hacking Google Glass to disable the "recording" light is--assuming such a hack doesn't exist already in the wild and we just haven't heard about it.

about 2 months ago
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Google Ordered To Remove Anti-Islamic Film From YouTube

Karl Cocknozzle Ridiculous assertion (321 comments)

The constitutional protections, and by extension US citizens, take in in the ass yet again.

I am not aware of a constitutional right to commit fraud. The project this person agreed to appear in bore zero resemblance to this one, and while it is true--she definitely has no right to control the work product she agreed to appear in, she has every right to sue over this other work that essentially puts her in the crosshairs of terrorists--totally without permission.

about 2 months ago
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Mt. Gox Gone? Apparent Theft Shakes Bitcoin World

Karl Cocknozzle Re:Where's the bailout? (695 comments)

Oh, that's right. Unregulated currency free from government interference. Enjoy!

Yeah, there aren't enough breaths of air in this world for all of the well-deserved "I told you so"s that will be thrown around...

about 2 months ago
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US Carriers Said To Have Rejected Kill Switch Technology Last Year

Karl Cocknozzle This is the dumbest thing I've ever heard (197 comments)

Why would anybody favor such an expensive and ineffective option (with so many shortcomings) when the carriers could just be required to keep a database of unique identifiers (don't quote me--I think they're called IMEI numbers) of phones reported stolen and simply blacklist those phones from their networks.

Then, a person can report their phone stolen and the carriers make it useless because none of them are allowed to service it while it is in the "stolen" database.

No "kill-switch" required.

about 2 months ago
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ISP Fights Causing Netflix Packet Drops

Karl Cocknozzle Re:Netflix offers a colo/CDN bandwidth saver for I (289 comments)

Yes, that's what co-location is: Somebody else pays you for physical access to your site for long-term deployment of equipment. So the "physical access" requirement isn't exactly some sort of "evil scheme" netflix invented to screw over Comcast.

This part is nonsensical:

Everything from physical access requirements to the ol' "By the way we may host other, non-Netflix content on these things in the future, and we'll charge people for the privilege, but you'll still have to treat it as Netflix data and not expect any money for carrying it on your network".

1) They already charge people to access their service now, and in a way that apparently harms Comcast/ISPs in general, so we have zero difference from the status quo--the ISPs already have accepted this as "normal" and I don't see how they can ever change that without essentially erasing the entire Internet and starting over.

2) If Netflix hosts other people's data on those systems... so what? It's to Comcast's benefit--the more content that users stream that way (as opposed to over their expensive peering links) the happier their customers will be.

3) Comcast already gets money to carry all of this data--they get it from their subscribers. They're caterwauling for a double-dip opportunity--the right to bill not just for bandwidth to users, but for the same bandwidth again to companies providing content.

about 2 months ago
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ISP Fights Causing Netflix Packet Drops

Karl Cocknozzle Netflix offers a colo/CDN bandwidth saver for ISPs (289 comments)

Netflix has a program where they'll colocate some servers containing a content cache on a segment of the ISPs network so that their peering connections aren't getting beaten to death--why wouldn't these companies get involved in such a program other than as a means to squeeze more money from Netflix, their subscribers, or both.

about 2 months ago
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Are Bankers Paid Too Much? Are Technology CEOs?

Karl Cocknozzle Re:They are all paid too much (712 comments)

CEOs aren't "fired" the same way you and I are.

Sure they are. I know quite a few people who were fired with crazy good severance packages. Sure, they weren't set for life, but being able to piss around for 3 months before even _starting_ to look for a job is sure as hell an overpayment.

But that's just the point: It is extremely rare for somebody outside of the C-suite to get such a privilege.

Outside of c-level executives, such lavish and generous severance packages are occasionally found in situations where the person worked at a place for decades and got laid off in year 25 or something like that. There is no other job category I can name where you can completely just ruin the business, screw the pooch utterly, and still not just get severance, but indeed, be contractually entitled to walk away with a multi-million dollar severance package. Most people fired for cause (i.e. incompetence) are not given fat severance packages--they may get 4-6 weeks pay in exchange for signing something saying they won't sue the company, but that would basically be it. But even if your professional bud gets three whole months salary, so what?

C-suite guys routinely get fired with millions in their pockets.

about 2 months ago
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Are Bankers Paid Too Much? Are Technology CEOs?

Karl Cocknozzle Re:They are all paid too much (712 comments)

The fact that executive pay being so disproportionate to employee pay "feels really crappy" is not a problem. The fact that executive pay being so disproportionate to employee pay destabilizes society by destroying the middle class is a problem!

Not to mention that it also, over time, erodes and eventually destroys the value in these companies as they shed employees and shunt more and more of the profits to the C-suite for disbursement as bonuses, high salaries, and lavish perks. That massive largesse encourages the taking of huge risks to generate the short-term gains required to ring up the eye-popping bonuses.

When they fail, the company gets hurt, maybe goes bankrupt, but the price is payed by working people in the form of layoffs.

about a month ago
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Are Bankers Paid Too Much? Are Technology CEOs?

Karl Cocknozzle Re:They are all paid too much (712 comments)

It would distort the free market and no one would take the risk or the very hard work like 70 hour work weeks, MBAs, and other things for dozens of years without the compensation.

Doing so would make great talent do something else or not try as hard and everyone looses out.

Once upon a time these earnings were effectively capped by vigorous oversight from boards of directors, and that didn't seem to create a mass-exodus of talent, nor did it in-any-way slow down innovation or competition.

Plus, if somebody is really so "talented" they have "earned" $100 million per year I would postulate their time would be better spent starting their own business so instead of just getting a "cut" of the company's profits he gets all of them. Certainly if he's actually worth $100 million he's got more than enough talent to make that happen.

If someone is paid too much the market takes care of that with something called a firing.

CEOs aren't "fired" the same way you and I are. You want them gone? Great! You trigger their golden parachute and they're set for life! Such total lack of accountability is what leads to blundering performers walking away richer than an oil tycoon for delivering zero value, or in some cases, erasing millions in value through mismanagement. Sears comes to mind, as the spectacular recent example of some arrogant hedge-fund asshole negotiating an enormous pay package for himself and then nearly putting the company under in just a couple short years.

And the fact that you'd try to conflate such masters of the universe with a salaryman's layoff sort of underscores why your point of view is more than a little half baked. Maybe quarter-baked? But even that's generous.

about a month ago
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FCC Planning Rule Changes To Restore US Net Neutrality

Karl Cocknozzle This was my submission... (235 comments)

Everybody else's full-handle is used in their submissions (including people with SPACES and names 3-5x longer than mine) so why am I "Karl C" and not "Karl Cocknozzle?"

Truncating my last name is an insult to generations of Cocknozzles that have come before me.

about 2 months ago
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Killing Net Neutrality Could Be Good For You

Karl Cocknozzle Re:Ignore the elephant in the room (361 comments)

"No, you shouldn't worry about prioritization, in fact it can help startups."

What? Wasn't that what everyone was worried about to begin with? That those with all the purse strings would be able to lock out these very startups you're claiming will benefit the most from this setup?

Their comments fly in the face of logic and basic economics.

Once the ISPs can double-dip, charging twice for the same bandwidth, there will exist a tremendous disincentive to carrying any traffic they can't double-dip on. Worst case scenario, "startups" without enormous financial backing will simply be stuck on the Internet slow-lane.

"Help startups"? My ass!

about 2 months ago

Submissions

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FCC Planning Rule Changes to Restore U.S. Net Nuetrality

Karl Cocknozzle Karl Cocknozzle writes  |  about 2 months ago

Karl Cocknozzle (514413) writes "In a statement issued today, FCC commissioner Tom Wheeler announced that the commission will begin a rule-making process to re-impose Net Neutrality, which was recently struck down in Federal court. Among the standards Wheeler intends to pursue are vigorous enforcement of a requirement for transparency in how ISPs manage traffic, and a prohibition on blocking (the "no blocking" provision.)

Which seems like exactly what neutrality activists have been demanding: Total prohibition of throttling, and vigorous enforcement of that rule, and of a transparency requirements so ISPs can't try to mealy-mouth their way around accusations that they're already throttling Netflix. Even before the court decision overturning net neutrality, Comcast and Verizon users have been noting Netflix slowdowns for months."

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