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Comments

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New Raspberry Pi Model B+

KevReedUK Re: Model C (202 comments)

Probably because it's using the same SoC as the B model. IIRC the A and B variants were different not only in the layout/ports, but also the underlying SoCs (CPU, GPU, RAM combination). This would suggest that the major model identifier will be used to indicate the underlying SoC, while suffixes like '+' will be used to indicate layout/ports. This is, however, just a somewhat educated guess on my part...

about a week ago
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The First Person Ever To Die In a Tesla Is a Guy Who Stole One

KevReedUK Re: Unsafe at any speed (above 100 MPH)... (443 comments)

Local dealers insure safety? Personally, I'm no fan of any insurance company, but I'd still rather get insurance from them than from any dealer... Or did you mean ensure?

about two weeks ago
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The First Person Ever To Die In a Tesla Is a Guy Who Stole One

KevReedUK Re: Unsafe at any speed (above 100 MPH)... (443 comments)

Actually, according to the summary, one half DID catch fire, the other half briefly became an aircraft (and let's not dwell on the fact that it did so with neither a properly filed flight plan, nor any communication with any form the air traffic control).

about two weeks ago
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Microsoft Settles With No-IP After Malware Takedown

KevReedUK Re: I see these and laugh (83 comments)

Are you also proposing that this browser not support plugins? Otherwise, what's to stop malware writers creating a plugin that captures input and phones home with it? Or are you suggesting that the browser only support plugins obtained from some kind of walled garden? Who will police it? In the end, the problem remains that people will be the weak link. When discussing security, even computer security, it has always been thus, and likely always will be.

about two weeks ago
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Today In Year-based Computer Errors: Draft Notices Sent To Men Born In the 1800s

KevReedUK Re: Technically, it's not a "draft notice" (205 comments)

And now I feel really daft, because up to this point I was thinking they meant draft as in 'non-final version'. As a result, the biggest question I was thinking of was 'sure, it's embarrassing that copies were sent to the dead, but more importantly, why not wait for the final version?'

about two weeks ago
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Today In Year-based Computer Errors: Draft Notices Sent To Men Born In the 1800s

KevReedUK Re: What has a DMV got to do with draft notices? (205 comments)

I'm guessing here (I didn't read TFA), but people are probably more likely to keep their addresses updated with the DMV than they are with anything that could potentially lead to them being called up for service in the military. As such, to make sure that the database is as accurate as possible, it would make sense to periodically merge data from the DMV. As for the records still being in the database, despite the demise of those to whom they refer, I'm one of those people who believes that once a record is in a database, unless it should never have been there in the first place, it should NOT be deleted. If no longer relevant, then set a status flag of some kind, but don't delete it. I'm not an American, and, more to the point, am not familiar with how data exchange occurs between state and federal government departments, but if it's anything like it is over here in the UK, when someone dies the death is registered with the local register office. That information is not automatically shared with the DVLA (our equivalent of your DMV, but just one at a national level) or any other organisation. If the US system is anything like ours (and with the added complications inherent with some government bodies being federal, some state and possibly some at even more localised levels, it would surprise me a HUGE amount if such automatic data exchange was commonplace), it's understandable that those records were not only still in the database, but were still marked as active. Would we rather they simply assumed that once a person reaches a given age that they are obviously dead and can hence have their record updated accordingly? Obviously none of this excuses how that data merge was handled. If my assumption above is correct about the data from the DMV being imported purely to ensure that addresses and contact numbers are up to date, the obvious question that follows is why these older records led to letters being sent out. The date of birth field should only have been used for identifying records to receive address updates and, as such, if anyone born in the 1800s received such letters it would be due either to a poorly written query, or to the date of birth field already being wrong prior to the merge (or, of course both).

about two weeks ago
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UK Computing Student Jailed After Failing To Hand Over Crypto Keys

KevReedUK Re: But it wasn't for "national security" (353 comments)

Perhaps you meant to say no one's going to jail AS A RESULT OF being born in the 80s. Your choice of wording can be taken to mean that being born in the 80s can be used as a universal defence to get away with any crime...

about two weeks ago
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Airbus Patents Windowless Cockpit That Would Increase Pilots' Field of View

KevReedUK Re: nice work (468 comments)

Closing the windows? I should think so too! Otherwise it would get pretty draughty once an airliner gets up to speed, even in the thinner air at higher altitudes!

about two weeks ago
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Airbus Patents Windowless Cockpit That Would Increase Pilots' Field of View

KevReedUK Re: Failsafe? (468 comments)

"rodders no longer directly... " Is this something else to be blamed on Delboy?

about two weeks ago
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Use of Encryption Foiled the Cops a Record 9 Times In 2013

KevReedUK Ermmm... what??? (115 comments)

Before this, the number stood at zero? Wouldn't it be more accurate to say that "before this, we have no f%@#ing clue what the number stood at because there is no data"???

about two weeks ago
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Goldman Sachs Demands Google Unsend One of Its E-mails

KevReedUK Re: Reputational Damage (346 comments)

Do you know any users who HAVEN'T been conditioned into clicking "yes" to any such prompt? (Please note, I said users, not admins)

about two weeks ago
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Tom's Hardware: Microsoft Smartband Coming In October With 11 Sensors

KevReedUK Re: Not Long (70 comments)

I'm no MS shill, but in my opinion, the best way of sending all the MicroSoft drones to sleep is to keep up your kind of rhetoric. It's certainly sending me to sleep!

about three weeks ago
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Tom's Hardware: Microsoft Smartband Coming In October With 11 Sensors

KevReedUK Re: Inside of the wrist? (70 comments)

It's likely that the sensor for determining heart-rate will probably be located at the back of the display, and will work better if on the inside of your wrist (i.e. over the so-called pulse point). That's probably why it's intended to be worn on the inside of your wrist.

about three weeks ago
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Mass. Supreme Court Says Defendant Can Be Compelled To Decrypt Data

KevReedUK Re:No Question the Drive is His, No 5th Amend. Iss (560 comments)

My understanding of the fifth (although, IANAL) is that whilst invoking it may cause prosecutors/LEOs to suspect, maybe even believe, that the drive contains evidence that you have committed a crime, the constitutional interpretation is that this suspicion/belief does not constitute evidence/proof and, as such, should not sway, or be used to sway, the decision making process of the court/jury.

about three weeks ago
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Mass. Supreme Court Says Defendant Can Be Compelled To Decrypt Data

KevReedUK Re:Plausible deniability (560 comments)

If prosecutors can't prove the existence of an encrypted volume, they can't keep you in jail for not giving up the keys for something which might not exist.

Except that in this case, the prosecutors can (and did) use the testimony already given to prove (he was, after all, daft enough to admit it!) that encrypted data did exist, that it contained the files that they were looking to find, and that he could cooperate in their retrieval of the files but was unprepared to do so.

about three weeks ago
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Mass. Supreme Court Says Defendant Can Be Compelled To Decrypt Data

KevReedUK Re:Ruling doesn't change much. (560 comments)

From the moment you are arrested to the moment you have a lawyer, there is nothing in the world you can say to improve your legal outcome.

Technically not true...

If you say you want legal representation, that is:

a) Something you can say
b) Something that can improve your legal outcome

about three weeks ago
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Mass. Supreme Court Says Defendant Can Be Compelled To Decrypt Data

KevReedUK Re:I lost the password (560 comments)

OK... so the fact that they have a 6 month retention policy is one thing, and does, indeed, pretty much invalidate Rigel47's post.

BUT it does raise a perhaps more important question...

IANAL, but I believe the IRS can audit you after up to 6 years. Bearing this in mind, and the fact that I think it is highly unlikely that they would accept the excuse of "I only have a 6-month retention policy on my receipts" as sufficient to allow you to get away without providing the relevant documentation, it does lead me to wonder... If they are forcing and enforcing long retention policies on those that they serve, why do they get away with only having to accommodate a twelfth of the retention period themselves?

about three weeks ago
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One Developer's Experience With Real Life Bitrot Under HFS+

KevReedUK Re:Legacy file systems should be illegal (396 comments)

Microsoft has two technologies in Windows Server 2012: Storage Spaces (which is LVM level), and ReFS. Both when used together can detect bit rot, but IIRC, only when the Storage Space volume is set to mirroring, nor parity.

Used to be true. In 2012R2, you can use integrity streams on parity spaces too, and get the corruption prevention there.

about a month ago
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One Developer's Experience With Real Life Bitrot Under HFS+

KevReedUK Re:Legacy file systems should be illegal (396 comments)

On reading up on ReFS, I am of the opinion that it is a step in the right direction, but has been released before it's ready. The version included with Server 2012 (and subsequent versions so far) doesn't include a whole raft of technologies that are (and have been for a looong time) present in NTFS.

Don't get me wrong, I'm no NTFS fanboy, but the majority of the features that they failed to include are ones that are practically indispensable in a range of settings. Whilst I could concur that, with the advent of (compared to a few years ago) cheap storage, NTFS compression has essentially had its day, other features are not so easy to do without. If you're a company that uses (out of necessity) legacy software with a need for 8.3 filenames, you can't use ReFS to host your data. If you need to use EFS, you're SOL. And to design a file-system with such a limited feature-set and release it, then say that it is ideal for using in a file server situation when it doesn't even support QUOTAS? Yes, I know, you can get third party COTS packages to handle that, but why bother if it's already in NTFS?

Frankly, one of the most laughable things to me is that they release this new file system designed to heal itself, but leave out so many features that THEIR OWN OS can't even be installed on it (no hard-links, for a start).

I do, however, go back to my original sentence.... ReFS is a step in the right direction, but is essentially useless in many (most) scenarios until it gets the features that we have largely come to rely on. IMHO, despite MS's claims to the contrary, it's not even file-share ready. The only environment I would even consider this to have a place in its current incarnation is in a tiny-business or home server environment in those frightening (but thankfully rare) cases where hardware RAID is out of the question. Even then, however, it could only be used to store the file shares. No chance of putting your Exchange/Sharepoint/SQL on it. But why bother, when you can just as easily use NTFS?

about a month ago

Submissions

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How long now...?

KevReedUK KevReedUK writes  |  more than 6 years ago

KevReedUK (1066760) writes "Our "Friends" over at ZDNet appear to be eulogising over the upcoming death of physical media sales. In their article here they refer to the noticeable drop in physical sales of albums whilst digital sales continue climbing (albeit at a reduced rate).

Normally, this would be a case of "Nothing to see here...", save for their assertion that one of the key reasons for the music industry's slowdown is piracy. Is it just me, or is this a bit of a stretch?"

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