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Regin Malware In EU Attack Linked To US and British Intelligence Agencies

Kevin Fishburne Re:Advanced malware controlling industrial systems (110 comments)

You are wanting to be commenting here.

Heh, thanks. While self-commanding killer robots are the obvious focus of our fear, it's not always the most obvious expectation that bites one in the ass. Killer robots would either never get used or have so many safeguards they'd be half useless amidst the chaos of war and the treachery and adaptability of humans. Though they'd have some degree of self-preservation, they would have no desire or ability to reproduce. Malware on the other hand is designed to do anything to avoid removal and replicate through any means possible. What better way to avoid being deleted than to make the infected facility uninhabitable or exceedingly dangerous to those who could remove it? This logic could be extrapolated to "protecting" surrounding areas, or distant areas connected by network infrastructure that could be used as access points. It's the seeming innocence and perceived weakness of something intangible like software that could reduce the consideration and implementation of safeguards when crafting malware. Right now malware's just an expensive pain in the ass, but a day may come when during your coffee break all the doors lock, the ventilation system halts and the facility begins flooding with CO2.

yesterday
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Regin Malware In EU Attack Linked To US and British Intelligence Agencies

Kevin Fishburne Advanced malware controlling industrial systems (110 comments)

This thought began as a joke, but this actually does sound how something like Skynet could be born. Malware is infamous for aggressively trying to preserve itself. We all joke about how stupid the idea of programming an AI with a strong sense of self-preservation is because of the obvious dangers, but that is exactly how malware is programmed. Programming it to control industrial systems as well (giving it a "body") seems like a really bad idea, particularly if the aim is not to sabotage the infected industrial system, but to cause as much damage to the target nation as possible (a reasonable wartime goal).

yesterday
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Nielsen Will Start Tracking Netflix and Amazon Video

Kevin Fishburne Cheapest and simplest solution (55 comments)

Write a bot to track The Pirate Bay. They give you the program name, upload date, and number of seeds and peers in real-time. They don't even require registration for this information, much less payment. Sure the data would require a little interpretation and extrapolation, but I can think of no better measure of success and popularity.

5 days ago
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Halting Problem Proves That Lethal Robots Cannot Correctly Decide To Kill Humans

Kevin Fishburne Re:Kill Limit (327 comments)

That's an excellent idea, although I thought of an improvement. Instead of sending waves of our own men to clear the kill counter, we could air drop inflatable sex dolls filled with snakes. Man, future war's gonna be crazy!

5 days ago
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Halting Problem Proves That Lethal Robots Cannot Correctly Decide To Kill Humans

Kevin Fishburne Borg in "good mood" mode (327 comments)

Maybe killer robots should be designed as peace keepers, with their primary function being to search out and disarm armed non-allied personnel and confiscate their weapons. It would only use lethal force when fired upon and could identify the shooter with near 100% accuracy. There would also be a timeout period per target so they wouldn't hunt them indefinitely. If the target surrendered, dropped or ejected the ammunition from their weapon the robot would break the target's kill AI. So they'd basically roam about like the Borg and only fuck you up when you attacked them. The robot could respond to lack of compliance to surrender a weapon without an attack with non-lethal force, then take the weapon from the incapacitated bearer.

I suppose my point is that there's a big difference between designing a robot that can kill when necessary and designing something like a walking gun turret from Aliens. Since they're robots (more expendable than people), the strategy of provoking the enemy into attacking them merely by their presence and continual demands to surrender weaponry (and thereby clearly identifying the attackers as proper targets) seems like a good one. Even when the bad guys finally figure out, "Hey man, whatever you do don't shoot that damn thing," if the robot is faster than they are it will attempt to disarm them manually which could again provoke an attack.

5 days ago
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Player-Run MMORPG By Former Ultima Online Devs Finding Kickstarter Success

Kevin Fishburne Re:Games are getting to be like TV shows (33 comments)

Good luck with your project. I've been working on something similar for the last four years, minus the customized, player-run servers. I think both projects share the same goal of bringing MMORPGs back to what their roots promised; freedom and infinite possibility. The real key to success I think is to ensure the systems and rules address from the bottom up (fundamentally) what allows a real society to flourish. Most MMOs systems start from high level concepts, resulting in systems that are poorly integrated and easily exploitable with no countermeasures available to the victims other than GM moderation or developer-implemented "invisible wall" style bandaids. If you get your systems just right and keep them basic enough, players will be able to construct their own defenses against would-be griefers, just like in real life.

about a week ago
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Tor Eyes Crowdfunding Campaign To Upgrade Its Hidden Services

Kevin Fishburne Re:A good idea (106 comments)

The FBI, GCHQ, BND, etc are going to tear apart the finances of every person that donates to this project.

Under what pretense? Funding terrorism? Tor, Ter, not too much a stretch I guess. Seriously, they can't do a thing to stop Tor funding without resorting to breaking or seriously misapplying their own laws. I don't think they'll go that far.

about a week ago
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Big Talk About Small Samples

Kevin Fishburne Re:Bennett!!!!!! (243 comments)

I really hate to dox someone, but I believe I've found out who Bennett is: http://youtu.be/G0tljvD49RU

All I can say is, if you're going to show up at his front door or make rape threats, you do so at your own peril.

about a week ago
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Tor Eyes Crowdfunding Campaign To Upgrade Its Hidden Services

Kevin Fishburne A good idea (106 comments)

Finally the world has a way to give their respective government a mighty middle finger after all the bullshit that's been going on lately. I hope they get millions from every corner of Earth.

about a week ago
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A Worm's Mind In a Lego Body

Kevin Fishburne Re:Memory mapping? (200 comments)

Pride is not what is "holding us back" in this field.

Pride has held us back since we were first capable of feeling it. The inability to admit to being wrong because the evidence offends one's vanity has always plagued science and every other part of our culture and personal relationships.

After thousands of years of attempts, not one man out of the whole of humanity can tell us what intelligence is, much less how it can emerge out of any observed natural process. We only assume that it is possible because we are operating on a presumption of materialism.

Considering how little we understand life mechanically, much less life as mind bogglingly complex as a human, it's no surprise that we currently have no answer outside the realm of philosophy and general description. If "materialism" is what can be directly or indirectly observed by people, unfortunately there's no escaping that without divine intervention.

Once we can fully measure the state of every particle in a human brain and run a simulation with complete accuracy, we should not be too surprised if it turns out to be only a simulation of a comatose state.

I think a lot of people, particularly atheist scientists, would be so surprised they'd immediately fall to their knees and ask God for forgiveness. Ironically I'd be overjoyed to discover we all had souls. Unfortunately the smell prevents me from believing it.

about a week ago
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A Worm's Mind In a Lego Body

Kevin Fishburne Re:Memory mapping? (200 comments)

Call me when you show non-biological free will. Emulation of deterministic life processes is interesting, but it's free will that needs to be demonstrated in silicon.

Life is extremely efficient, from the micro to the macro scale. To attempt to recreate even a simple organism using current technology (including a purely logical recreation in silicon) would be like building a modern supercomputer out rocks and sticks. When you speak of "free will" being recreated, you've pretty much chosen the highest possible level of what we'd consider a property of advanced life. What excited me about the article is that it suggests instead of tackling the mountain it may be more fruitful to attack a single grain of sand first. Perhaps once we understand a grain of sand, we can start working our way up to the higher and more complex relationships and functionality.

For example, rather than trying to create AI using programming, try reverse-engineering a single-celled organism's molecular composition and chemical processes. If that can be understood completely it provides a starting point for how to reproduce and modify it. Being able to "run" a bacterium in a simulated environment, and later being able to create one physically, is the first step toward truly understand how life works as a machine. Until we have that kind of understanding, the idea of creating real intelligence or artificial life will be confined to cheap imitations which work nothing like the real thing. If we don't understand how a human works as a massive ongoing chemical reaction, we have zero chance of creating one out of gears and silicon.

about a week ago
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A Worm's Mind In a Lego Body

Kevin Fishburne Memory mapping? (200 comments)

Emulating the connectivity and functionality of neurons is pretty awesome, but it would seem the next logical step would be to map and interpret how memories are stored and processed, as well as organ feedback (skin, smell, glands). What's really interesting about this is that it shows, at least to some degree, that a simple brain can be reproduced using mathematical relationships (programming) and "run" with a I/O feedback loop. As far as the philosophical stuff, I think eventually we'll be forced to accept that life is a type of machine and that the "ghost" is an illusion emerging from its complexity. Other than better neuroscience, the main thing holding us back is pride.

about a week ago
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Philae's Batteries Have Drained; Comet Lander Sleeps

Kevin Fishburne Re:We may hear from Philae later (337 comments)

That's what I was thinking too, until I realized someone would have to go up there and hit the power button to bring it out of hibernate. Dammit.

about two weeks ago
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Philae's Batteries Have Drained; Comet Lander Sleeps

Kevin Fishburne Re:Gerald Bull was an amateur. (337 comments)

Drill a 2-3km shaft into a salt dome, excavate a cavity at the bottom, suspend a 150kT nuclear warhead at the centre surrounded by a reaction mass, such as water laced with a neutron absorber. Above the cavity, at the bottom of the shaft, put a large shock absorber (such as a few hundred metres of oil backed by an ablative-coated pusher plate), with your 3500 tonnes of payload on top.

Most of the radiation would be contained underground, and a dome over the launch site would capture most of the rest.

Is that like the geek's version of "hold my beer"? Holy shit.

about two weeks ago
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Japanese Maglev Train Hits 500kph

Kevin Fishburne Re:kph? (418 comments)

It is nice to pick international system units, however it would be better to do it right. This should be km/h, not kph.

Unit Nazis per hour. :)

about two weeks ago
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Cameron Says People Radicalized By Free Speech; UK ISPs Agree To Censor Button

Kevin Fishburne A widening gulf (316 comments)

While we seem to be advancing technologically at an exponential rate, it seems culturally we're advancing at a snail's pace. I wonder how long it'll be before this divide is so vast it swallows us whole. It's like little kids with a gun; they know what it is and what it does, yet invariably someone ends up getting shot. What I can't figure out is if our misuse of technology is out of ignorance or malice.

about two weeks ago
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Assassin's Creed: Unity Launch Debacle Pulls Spotlight Onto Game Review Embargos

Kevin Fishburne Re:Bug (473 comments)

Here's one of the bugs... http://spherical-sphinx.com/ac...

Nah, I think that's just what melee combat looks like. Games are pretty violent these days.

about two weeks ago
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Crowd-Sourced Experiment To Map All Human Skills

Kevin Fishburne Tricky headlines lately (70 comments)

I must be losing it, as earlier today I interpreted at first glance "Study Shows How Humans Can Echolocate" as "Study Shows How Humans Can Eat Chocolate" and now "Crowd-Sourced Experiment To Map All Human Skills" as "Crowd-Sourced Experiment To Map All Human Skulls". Haven't even cracked my first beer yet...maybe that's the problem.

about two weeks ago
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The Strangeness of the Mars One Project

Kevin Fishburne Re:Yes and no (246 comments)

Maybe, just maybe, Mars One people will stumble across a fully viable, relatively hospitable, alien population which will save them and propel us into a VERY "New World".

I heard some other Italian guy mention something about seeing canals up there, so who knows! I'll anxiously be awaiting the Mars One crew's report on the matter.

about two weeks ago

Submissions

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rakuten.com Possible Security Breach

Kevin Fishburne Kevin Fishburne writes  |  about 10 months ago

Kevin Fishburne (1296859) writes "At 1:15 am EST I received an order confirmation from rakuten.com, formerly buy.com, for a $64 computer case and a $300 gift certificate, the former being shipped to my address and the latter being sent to the email address minhhieun090@19store.us. As my password for the site would be difficult to crack by brute force or dictionary attacks I believe their site may have been compromised to reveal only usernames and passwords. I don't believe users' payment information has been compromised or they would have used them directly or sold them instead of using the site to place gift card orders. I have since removed my payment methods, changed my password and notified their support staff of the potential breach. If you have an account with Rakuten/Buy, I strongly suggest removing your payment methods and hardening your password."
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Open Source IDE GAMBAS Reaches 3.0

Kevin Fishburne Kevin Fishburne writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Kevin Fishburne writes "After years of work, creator Benoît Minisini and friends are just in time for New Year's celebrations with the first stable release of GAMBAS 3.

Per their web site, "Gambas is a free development environment based on a Basic interpreter with object extensions, a bit like Visual Basic (but it is NOT a clone !)."

GAMBAS is component-based, so check out the list for an idea of what you can do with it."

Link to Original Source
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Fund to Contest Software Patents on Prior Art

Kevin Fishburne Kevin Fishburne writes  |  more than 3 years ago

" rel="nofollow">Kevin Fishburne writes "Watching the ensuing software patent wars, is there no way to combat them at their own level? Could a fund be started to systematically challenge individual software patents using the best cost/benefit ratio at the current budget level? Widely available, time-stamped GPL code could be used as evidence of prior art in each case. Does something like this already exist? Surely this is something (if it does its job) we could all get behind."
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Original Apple II Ultima source code published

Kevin Fishburne Kevin Fishburne writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Kevin Fishburne writes "Odkin dropped a bombshell in a post on Ultima Aiera when he mentioned that copies of the original California Pacific Ultima were "out there" (meaning he has the floppies), then proceeded to post some code snippets obtained from Ctrl-C, CATALOG and LIST.

He emailed a copy of the disk images to me, which I immediately extracted to verify their authenticity. While the source code to all other Ultima games has been lost, it seems the code to the original has been found.

See for yourself, as I have archived it here:

http://www.eightvirtues.com/misc/ULTIMA%20(1981)%20California%20Pacific%20Computer%20By%20Lord%20British.tar.gz"

Link to Original Source
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Hybrid human-animal DNA experiments raise concerns

Kevin Fishburne Kevin Fishburne writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Kevin Fishburne writes "British scientists are calling for a new agency to oversee the mixing of human and animal DNA, which is progressing at a rate most may not be aware of:

'Among experimentation that might spark concern are those where human brain cells might change animal brains, those that could lead to the fertilization of human eggs in animals and any modifications of animals that might create attributes considered uniquely human, like facial features, skin or speech.'

'Some disagree. "We think some of these should be done, but they should be done in an open way to maintain public confidence," said Robin Lovell-Badge, head of stem cell biology and developmental genetics at Britain’s Medical Research Council, one of the expert group members. He said experiments injecting human brain cells into the brains of rats might help develop new stroke treatments or that growing human skin on mice could further understanding of skin cancer.'

Worth a read, if only to scare the crap out of yourself."

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Why my app will never be on iOS

Kevin Fishburne Kevin Fishburne writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Kevin Fishburne writes "I've been working on a Linux game for a year or so and have flirted with the idea of porting a watered-down version to Android. The idea of making it available on Apple devices, while financially attractive, I'd always put in the "when hell freezes over" bin. And then I find this article."
Link to Original Source
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Ultima IV - EA takedowns precede official reboot

Kevin Fishburne Kevin Fishburne writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Kevin Fishburne writes "According to posts at the Ultima fan site Ultima Aiera both browser-based Ultima IV Sega Master System emulation at Master System 8 and IBM-PC port at Phi Psi Software have received cease and desist letters from Electronic Arts, the current IP holder of the Ultima franchise.

The post states that despite the widely held belief that Origin had allowed the Ultima Dragons to distribute Ultima IV freely in 1997, in fact that is no longer the case. It further suggests that the EA takedowns are preceding an upcoming browser-based Ultima IV reboot by Bioware Mythic.

Has EA lost an eighth, or are they well within their rights by going DMCA on a 26 year-old game they had no hand in developing?"

Link to Original Source
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Graf_Chokolo defiant as Sony ups the stakes

Kevin Fishburne Kevin Fishburne writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Kevin Fishburne writes "Sony PS3 cracker Graf_Chokolo, whose home was recently raided and computer equipment confiscated by German police, is now facing a 750,000 Euro fine and jail time. In spite of this he remains defiant, claiming "If you want me to stop then you should just kill me because i cannot live without programming, HV and Linux kernel hacking."

Is there a precedent for this kind of corporate terrorism?"

Link to Original Source
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Apple profits from rampant piracy in the App Store

Kevin Fishburne Kevin Fishburne writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Kevin Fishburne writes "According to an article at Ars:

'Imagine this: you and a partner develop a popular Flash game, one that's good enough that you decide to get to work on an iPhone port. Then, one day, while browsing the App Store, you see your game. Problem is, the port isn't done yet.'

Apparently this is happening all the time, with many of the illegal cloned games reaching the top 100 list. The article points out that Apple has been slow to respond and makes no mention of restitution for the victimized developers. In other words, the App Store floodgates are open wide and Apple is profiting from the resulting IP infringement."

Link to Original Source
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Army wants 36 more 'Punisher' weapons in 2012

Kevin Fishburne Kevin Fishburne writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Kevin Fishburne (1296859) writes ""The kids are calling it 'the Punisher,'" said Brig. Gen. Peter N. Fuller, who heads up the Program Executive Office Soldier. "I don't know what we're going to title this product, but it seems to be game-changing. You no longer can shoot at American forces and then hide behind something. We're going to reach out and touch you."

While this technology has been around for a while, this is the first time I've heard of it being used in theater. Looking like something from Unreal Tournament, the XM25 weapon system is essentially a horizontal, scaled-down bunker buster which can be programmed to detonate its rounds at arbitrary distances behind hardened positions. Put me down for two, thank you."

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Arx Fatalis updated; source code released under GP

Kevin Fishburne Kevin Fishburne writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Kevin Fishburne writes "According to WtF Dragon at Ultima Aiera, "The long and short: Arkane Studios have released what is probably going to be the final patch for their Ultima Underworld-inspired game (which, indeed, they tried to license as the third entry in that series), Arx Fatalis.

They have also released the source code for the game. That’s right, the complete source of Arx Fatalis is available for download."

The readme notes that the original game installation is required in order to play the compiled game, as the data files are certainly still copyrighted. Linux is in need of a good FPS dungeon crawler, though the code will need a hell of a lot of cleanup as it's a VC8/9 project and uses DirectX (ugh...)."

Link to Original Source
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Sanctimonia to Reduce Online Games to Fundamentals

Kevin Fishburne Kevin Fishburne writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Kevin Fishburne writes "Forgive me for posting about my own project, but I could think of no better crowd than /. to seeks words of wisdom from. I'm developing an open source online multiplayer game in GAMBAS that will simulate the basic aspects of life in such a way that more advanced behavior and gameplay could emerge from using them logically. It's of course graphical and optimized for a PS2-style game pad. To keep things simple the available technology is constrained (for now) to the pre-industrialized age.

The current MMO climate has settled around a few titles that remain commercially viable, though they are tightly geared toward producing profit. My game certainly takes monetization into account, but isn't sacrificing its principles to that end. Is there any advice that can be given for a "sandbox" or "emergent" style MMO that could strengthen its entertainment value as well as gameplay that is at least as balanced as that of real life?

I recognize and have researched the successes and failures of games like Ultima Online, Tabula Rasa, World of Warcraft, FarmVille, etc., but haven't drawn any real conclusions other than poor management and misdirected ideals. Any observances of the market response to such titles would be appreciated."

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