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Comments

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Reported iCloud Hack Leaks Hundreds of Private Celebrity Photos

Khyber Re:Where are these photos? (293 comments)

"Since when has Apple prided itself or even claimed strict security? "

Uhh, remember the Macs don't get viruses campaign?

yesterday
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Grand Ayatollah Says High Speed Internet Is "Against Moral Standards"

Khyber Anything that wrests away control (500 comments)

You already know they don't like this because it takes away their control over a population.

Of course they count it against their religion of control and abuse.

2 days ago
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Intel's Haswell-E Desktop CPU Debuts With Eight Cores, DDR4 Memory

Khyber Re:As wikipedia likes to say (179 comments)

Shitty? I've got a 486DX4 laptop using memory I got from pricewatch.com in 1996.

And it's still working.

All of my memory bought from Pricewatch has worked fine and is still working to this day.

3 days ago
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Google Introduces HTML 5.1 Tag To Chrome

Khyber code bloat (91 comments)

img is shorter than picture. good job bloating the code, whomever is responsible for this.

3 days ago
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Japanese Publishers Lash Out At Amazon's Policies

Khyber Re:Sure about that? (112 comments)

Amazon doesn't have monopoly power. No point in trying to learn from history when what you're learning is bullshit, son.

3 days ago
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Japanese Publishers Lash Out At Amazon's Policies

Khyber Re:Amazon riding rough over industry? One recourse (112 comments)

"You can also read it on any Apple computer."

I can most certainly guarantee your ass my Motorola-powered OS7 Apple laptop can not and will not read those files.

Also, now days there is no such thing as "an Apple computer" because it's an x86 piece of shit like every other computer out there.

3 days ago
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Intel's Haswell-E Desktop CPU Debuts With Eight Cores, DDR4 Memory

Khyber Re:Broadwell (179 comments)

"4-core Haswells that are running 3.8mhz"

Only 3.8 MHz? Wow, that's fucking slow. Glad I went AMD instead of intel!

3 days ago
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Intel's Haswell-E Desktop CPU Debuts With Eight Cores, DDR4 Memory

Khyber Re:Broadwell (179 comments)

"If it's for gaming, then the CPU isn't really a bottleneck like it's made out to be and there is no gain in going i7 over an i5 unless you are going to be streaming."

Man you're so full of shit I can smell you through the internet. First, the i7 has more PCI-E lanes, which translates over to "I can drop in more GPUs if desired."

Streaming shit is all dependent upon the framebuffer access now days - GPU. Not CPU.

It's like people don't understand how hardware acceleration works.

3 days ago
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Intel's Haswell-E Desktop CPU Debuts With Eight Cores, DDR4 Memory

Khyber Re:***Big intake of breath*** (179 comments)

No, but it runs MenuetOS which is what you should be learning because ASM is god and anything else plain out fucking sucks.

3 days ago
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Intel's Haswell-E Desktop CPU Debuts With Eight Cores, DDR4 Memory

Khyber Re: 5820K is an extremely nice part (179 comments)

"Plenty PCIe lanes. "

Nowhere fucking near enough. If I can't take a high-end part like this and drop quad PCI-E 3.0 16X GPUs in there, it's not a high end part, period.

40 lanes is about 40 lanes too few.

3 days ago
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Intel's Haswell-E Desktop CPU Debuts With Eight Cores, DDR4 Memory

Khyber Re:Obligatory (179 comments)

It runs Crysis flawlessly while I'm banging your mother, sister, and father.

Your brother is too busy with my dog for me to do anything with him.

3 days ago
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Intel's Haswell-E Desktop CPU Debuts With Eight Cores, DDR4 Memory

Khyber Re:Elephant in the room (179 comments)

Your quoted prices are bullshit. I can get 64GB for ~$350 (tax included) from pricewatch.

Go back to /g/ where you belong, n00b.

3 days ago
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Intel's Haswell-E Desktop CPU Debuts With Eight Cores, DDR4 Memory

Khyber Re:As wikipedia likes to say (179 comments)

"RAM prices are so high that you'd have to spend $700 to hit 64GB RAM (the max the board supports). That is just outrageous."

Except I'm finding 8GB RAM sticks of DDR3 for 40 bucks, So you obviously have no fucking clue how to price-shop.

Oh, you use /g/ recommended sourcing. No fucking wonder, you retard. Go to pricewatch.com.
You're probably the same idiot that shills for logicalincrements.

3 days ago
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Intel's Haswell-E Desktop CPU Debuts With Eight Cores, DDR4 Memory

Khyber Re:How is that surprising? (179 comments)

"Have you looked at RAM prices?"

Obviously you haven't in some time, because I can get an 8GB DDR3 stick for 40 bucks, which makes my 32GB only a mere fucking $160.

Do you even pricewatch.com you newegg-stuck n00b?

3 days ago
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Intel's Haswell-E Desktop CPU Debuts With Eight Cores, DDR4 Memory

Khyber Only 40 lanes (179 comments)

So I'm only going to have the ability to use two GPUs in SLI?

Nope. Fuck that.

3 days ago
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Islamic State "Laptop of Doom" Hints At Plots Including Bubonic Plague

Khyber Re:Hidden Files section? (360 comments)

Try again. We now know the Bubonic plague was not a bubonic plague, but a pneumonic one.

3 days ago
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Islamic State "Laptop of Doom" Hints At Plots Including Bubonic Plague

Khyber Re: But is it reaslistic? (360 comments)

"I'd be far more worried about smallpox, an easily created virus that has few people immunized these days."

Yea, about that. People who have contracted chickenpox or cowpox are pretty much half-immune to smallpox in the first place. Uh, classic Edward Jenner case, in fact; did you even pay attention in high school?

3 days ago

Submissions

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SoylentNews Blocks Submitters From Criticism

Khyber Khyber writes  |  about 6 months ago

Khyber (864651) writes "I've gotten tired of SoylentNews' clique.

I tried to submit a story regarding their blockage of legitimate complaints, I got banned from IRC and the website.

Looks like Soylent (thanks to Mattie_P) is worse than Slashdot.

I take back my 'visit this site' sig. I'm done with this site."
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Last.fm spies on your Skype Activity

Khyber Khyber writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Khyber writes "A good anon has found out and informed me that Last.fm spies on Skype calls. I use both, so I decided to follow his steps. I started by going to diagnostics (though I am linking his provided pictures) and and this is what one can expect to find. Last.fm makes zero notifications that it will listen in on VOIP programs like Skype. Are there any other programs out there that we should be aware of which do this? I would really enjoy not using such privacy-invading programs."
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Violation of ToS Should not be a Crime

Khyber Khyber writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Khyber writes "Three data and security breach notification bills have been approved by the Senate Judiciary Committee, one of which includes an amendment that adds clarity with regards to the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act. These three bills would require businesses to develop data privacy and security plans, and it would set a federal standard for notifying individuals of breaches of very sensitive personally identifiable information, such as credit card information or medical records. This clarification is welcomed, making the statute more focused towards hackers and identity thieves, instead of consumers that run afoul of ToS or AUPs of websites and service providers."
Link to Original Source
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FBI hacked by LulzSec, Whitehat Fraud Exposed

Khyber Khyber writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Khyber writes "LulzSec's Failboat continues to sail beautiful waters as now they have exposed fraud and anti-trust violations against members of an FBI post in Atlanta."
Link to Original Source
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Amazon Takes Wikileaks Offline, Sells Cables

Khyber Khyber writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Khyber writes "Irony, thine name is Amazon. After shutting down Wikileaks, an Amazon user has re-packaged a set of the cables in an E-book format and is selling them on Amazon. Of course, through this, Amazon makes a profit from part of the sale, and has yet to issue any statement regarding this. Many users of the site are expressing extreme displeasure at Amazon profiting from something they they originally had available for free, and there might be a possible backlash just in time for the Christmas season."
Link to Original Source
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Website assets being stolen - What can I do?

Khyber Khyber writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Khyber writes "My site assets are being ripped off, in some cases word-for-word, other cases frame shots of animations on my page. Here's the violating site, and here is my site for comparison. Unfortunately, it appears this site is foreign, and I'm not entirely sure what to do next. I've already contacted my legal advisors and site maintainers. What other steps should I take? I don't think I can get the DMCA to apply here, are there any treaties that could hold any hope for me?"
Link to Original Source
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Leaked E-mails Show Barwinska Case 'Shaky'

Khyber Khyber writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Khyber writes "More perusal of the recently-leaked ACS:Law e-mails have shown that the 2008 Isabella Barwinska case was built upon rather dubious grounds. This is starting to look worse for 'Pay up or else' litigation firms that have begun popping up across the world, as it shows that there is no real solid foundation behind the exorbitant damages awarded to the copyright holders, which are employing firms using the Barwinska case as a strong-arm tactic to scare people into payment."
Link to Original Source
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Anti-Piracy firm e-mails reveal firm scam

Khyber Khyber writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Khyber writes "A recent DDoS attack against a UK-based anti-pirating firm, known as ACS:Law, has resulted in a large backup archive of the server contents being made available for download, which has been done and is now being hosted by the Pirate Bay. Within this archive are e-mails from Andrew Crossley basically admitting that he is running a scam job, sending out thousands of frivolous legal threats on the premise that a percentage pay up immediately to avoid legal hassles."
Link to Original Source
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China's Site-blocking Software is Pirated

Khyber Khyber writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Khyber writes "PC Makers are going to be in a bind when it comes to selling PCs to China. With new mandates that censorware must be shipped with all new PCs sold in China, people have turned their heads towards the software behind this. Turns out that this software not only uses .DLL files from CyberSitter, but it also updates from their servers, and there are even more security holes to be exploited than before."
Link to Original Source
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Porn Industry Needs a Hand-out as Well

Khyber Khyber writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Khyber writes "It looks like not even the porn industry is recession-proof as it seems that the big porn producers are having problems keeping up sales in light of internet sites like redtube which give away their porn for free."
Link to Original Source
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Toyota Backs Away From DesktopNexus

Khyber Khyber writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Khyber writes "Slashdot recently covered the ongoing potential litigation against DesktopNexus, which included the demand that all images containing a Toyota, Scion, or Lexus were to be taken offline. Being an owner of one of those images, I immediately fired a very sternly-worded email (with help from a lawyer.) Toyota has capitulated, as noted here in their response to me:

"Thank you for contacting Toyota with your comments and concerns regarding the use of vehicle images. The letter asking the DesktopNexus site to remove all images featuring a Toyota, Scion or Lexus vehicle was the result of miscommunication at Toyota, which we regret.

Copyright law protects the creative work product of artists, photographers, and other creators. Toyota respects these rights, including those of photographers who work with Toyota. Toyota purchases the rights to the images it posts on its sites, and welcomes public use of those images where we have the rights to give. However, this permission is limited to editorial or personal use, not commercial use, such as advertising any products or services. That's because the photographers — not Toyota — retain the rights to any commercial use, and we cannot give permission to use those images for that purpose. In response the concerns raised by DesktopNexus, Toyota is working with photographers to determine what images may be used for noncommercial purposes, and what we can do to provide broader access. We hope you will understand and appreciate the legal constraints we face.

Toyota also welcomes interested members of the public to use their own images or photography of Toyota's vehicles, and we confirm that we have no objection to this use.""
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Good Freeware System Snapshot Tool?

Khyber Khyber writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Khyber writes "I'm doing a little personal research into a project that tracks what changes get made to your system every time you install a program. I know there are ways of checking through Windows Restore Points, but that's not what I'm trying to do. Instead, I'm going to start with an absolutely fresh Windows XP install, take a full snapshot of the entire installation on the hard drive, and burn that to a DVD (somewhat like a backup disc with an entire snapshot of my hard drive's current contents.) With every program I install, I'm going to take another snapshot, burn to DVD, and repeat the process until I have recreated every step taken to get to my current system state (all programs installed on a separate hard drive, all registry entries etc on the OS drive, with only snapshots of the OS drive being recorded.) The purpose for all of this I'm not legally allowed to talk about, due to confidentiality requirements. Does anybody know of such a program, preferably freeware, that will accomplish my objective, and are there tools that can be used to compare the difference in drive images?"
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Jeremy Jaynes, Spam King, To Walk Free.

Khyber Khyber writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Khyber writes "Jeremy Jaynes, noted AOL Spammer, is going to walk free. The Virginia Supreme Court (the same court which upheld the original conviction,) has declared the law used to charge Jeremy Jaynes as unconstitutional, citing it as "overly broad in scope" and that it was a violation of First Amendment rights."
Link to Original Source
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Single Carbon Nanotube = All in one Radio

Khyber Khyber writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Khyber writes "We're one step closer to having Star Trek badge communicators. Scientists at Berkeley have created a single carbon nanotube radio. They "constructed a fully functional, fully integrated radio receiver, orders-of-magnitude smaller than any previous radio, from a single carbon nanotube. The single nanotube serves, at once, as all major components of a radio: antenna, tuner, amplifier, and demodulator. Moreover, the antenna and tuner are implemented in a radically different manner than traditional radios, receiving signals via high frequency mechanical vibrations of the nanotube rather than through traditional electrical means." They've even rocked out Layla with it's aid!"
Link to Original Source
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Is a 1.5m Ethernet cable REALLY worth $499?

Khyber Khyber writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Khyber writes "It looks like Denon USA is attempting to corner the digital audiophile market with a $499 ethernet cable that claims to be able to "bring out all the nuances in digital audio reproduction from any of our Denon DVD players with the Denon Link feature." Now, no knowing geek would pay that much for a mere meter and a half of cabling, not unless it were fabricated from platinum, and especially knowing that digital is nothing more than ones and zeros, there are no 'nuances' to speak of, with the exception of what the DSP may generate during conversion, and then speaker distortion as sound is created. Kinda reminiscent of the wooden-knob potentiometer that costs $400. Anyone have any idea how companies manage to get away with this?"
Link to Original Source
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New scanning technique key to better processors

Khyber Khyber writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Khyber writes "Deformations in silicon are responsible for high electron mobility, which gives us better efficiency and higher speeds while reducing energy consumption. Until recently, chip manufacturers have only been simulating deformations in the silicon caused by stress on a nano-scale in order to get increases in ability. That will all change with a technology based upon electron holography. This method has much finer scanning resolution, and can scan thicker wafers of silicon, thus ensuring accurate measurements of stress at most any level of chip design. This greater understanding will lead to new silicon wafer designs and also greater yield potentials."
Link to Original Source

Journals

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UP FOR GRABS: SLASHCODE EXPLOITS

Khyber Khyber writes  |  about 5 months ago

Well, Soylent decided to rub me the wrong way.

Anyone want 26 vulnerabilites, POC, and sample code to what their site runs on, with full VM pre-loaded with POC and code snippets for testing?

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Flashlight Modification - From CFL to LED

Khyber Khyber writes  |  about 5 months ago

My old Coleman 5324 CFL lantern had the bulb die (ballast still good.)

However, I did not want to go back to the horribly inefficient CFL it used.

So I slammed in an MK-R LED with a heat sink.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YeEWvM2WbL8

This weekend, I'll be making a test video from the top of the nearby mountain. I'm going to try to spotlight my camera at my apartment while atop that mountain, and compare it to other light sources, like the LED on the iPhone 4S.

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Wall-AC LED Drive Achieved

Khyber Khyber writes  |  about 7 months ago

What else can I say? Simple, easy wall AC-LED drive has been achieved.

http://imgur.com/VmXBM4O

12V was the first step. This is ~105V. POC done.

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Lighting LEDs directly from AC easily achieved

Khyber Khyber writes  |  about 8 months ago

I figured out a simple way to make DC-operated LEDs work from AC. Most people suggest using a bridge rectifier. Why not make the LEDs the rectifier itself?

So I salvaged some LEDs from old damaged panels, and used them to create a rectifier. However, I used a 12VAC 200mA max wall wart, not 120VAC from the wall (I did not want to wire up four 120V strings of LEDs plus resistors and a smoothing cap for flicker reduction) so the circuit could be made incredibly basic. Essentially, the LEDs themselves acting as a rectifier eat up all of the voltage. Reverse voltage breakdown is not a problem, as voltage seems to add both ways. 12V total Vf for the LEDs, but as each LED has Vr of -5V, the total Vr is -20V. Can't overpower that with -12V. I've had my prototype running an hour straight on a heat sink, and so far not a single issue.

Too bad this is too obvious and simple to be patented. But have fun with it!

The flicker is certainly there, but for horticultural applications, as long as the photon output is acceptable, it will work. This should simplify LED design drastically.

Have video and have some some neat pictures.

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Google Took My Money

Khyber Khyber writes  |  about 10 months ago

I've been using Google Helpouts for a week, now. I haven't done much, only two clients, but I was supposed to be paid. I was under the impression that I didn't need a bank account to use Google Wallet. The wording on their site is 'Recommended.'

Well, my customers have had money taken from them, and not delivered to me. In order to get this money, I *HAVE* to have a bank account because I am now a service provider. None of this is mentioned when I went to update and verify my Google Wallet information. I've been on the phone with Google, they've been unable to do anything, so they say. Google, acting as the middleman, has essentially taken my money and says they can't do anything about it until I get a bank account. That's not possible until I correct an outstanding balance. I was hoping to use Google Wallet to be able to save up that money and then pay off the balance then and there. Nope.

So I've given out services and Google essentially refuses to pay me what I'm owed until I go through a third party.

Help me spread awareness, if you can, by giving me a +1 at https://plus.google.com/110351126148578351575/posts/h7QmWoRrtYA

Maybe Google will take notice and fix what logically is a violation of the anti-tying provisions of the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act.

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Free LEDs!

Khyber Khyber writes  |  about 10 months ago

http://www.rabled.com/

Just go look. You can get one free sample of any of those lights, but you can only pick ONE.

Dunno about you guys, but I picked the Bay Light.

It might help more to work in a lighting company. I am unsure if they have a choosing criteria for this.

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Finished Prototype - LED Iluminated Avenging Wrath Paladin Spell Wings

Khyber Khyber writes  |  about 10 months ago

In preparation for Blizzcon, a friend has been wanting to do some upgraded cosplay, spell effects. Well, a set of glowing wings works, since Avenging Wrath gives you a temporary set of wings.

Here's some HD video (but dark) of them in action, on their difficult-to-make harness.

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Going to a Low Tech Hobby

Khyber Khyber writes  |  about 10 months ago

A few days ago, I went for a walk down the local riverbed. To my surprise, I wandered upon a large cluster of grape vine, bearing wild grapes, tons of tiny ones.

Well, they're about 70/30 seed/fruit. Go figure. A little sample, and the flavor was a mix of tart and sweet. These would make a good wine, I figured.

I decided I'd go ahead and make a slightly more refined version of what the Romans and Greeks might have had. After the grapes were washed with a light bleach/water solution, rinsed thoroughly, and mashed, I had about 1.5 gallons of juice, to which another 1.25 gallons of water was added, plus 3 pounds of raw cane sugar, and 2 teaspoons of proofed bread yeast. All of this was put into a 3 gallon carboy with a rubber stopper and typical airlock. Right now, I'm getting a bubble roughly every 2 seconds from the airlock.

I'm expecting a wine with not a whole lot of alcohol, and a bit of sediment. There's not much point in doing a bunch of fermentations and filtrations on my first go-around. The smell right now is very light and quite pleasant. Almost like a perfected Boones Farm wine.

Have some HD video.

This should be ready in about 4 weeks, I'm not expecting a huge return on alcohol content given the yeast is past the best by date

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Taking A&D Electronics Down a Peg

Khyber Khyber writes  |  about a year ago

Well, for a very, very short time, I had a gig as an LCD panel repair tech. Until I learned that I was not going to get paid. So I quit, and straight to the labor board I went.

Looks like I stand to get about $3,200 max from them for their illegal practices.

I bet ChiMei, the company contracting A&D to do their panel repair, would *LOVE* to know one of their chosen repair depots isn't paying workers.

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Review: SinkPAD Direct Thermal Pathway PCB

Khyber Khyber writes  |  about a year ago

I've spent the last month testing and demolishing a bunch of new-design thermal PCBs from SinkPAD, and have come to the conclusion that this is a solid solution versus traditional dielectric PCBs commonly used for mounting LEDs. There are many pros, and a few cons, and I will address these in my review of their product, written below.

We will start with the good stuff first, the Pros. The SinkPAD Direct Thermal Pathway PCB is made from solid aluminum or copper (as of the time of this writing I had yet to test any copper PCB), so it's very good at thermal transfer. This helps make it easy to solder; versus a traditional dielectric board, the solder took to the SinkPAD in roughly half the time. This also comes in handy for reflow work and rework, as mounting and un-mounting an LED from the board is quick thanks to the PCB being constructed out of high-conductivity aluminum and copper. Repairing any mistakes takes minimal time and effort, a must for any prototype designer or hobbyist. The solder resist is also very solid, during my reflow cycling test I never once saw a solder bridge form, nor had any shorts. The same solder resist is quite durable against thermal shock as well. I torched it until it was smoking and crackling, near-black, and with no problems I was able to mount an LED to it and light it right up, and the remainder of the pad transferred heat exactly as it should. This durability is exactly what the military and police forces could use for LED-assisted weapons solutions, such as barrel or grip-mounted lights, or IR night-vision equipment. The aluminum boards are light-weight and stiff, very difficult to bend, even with a pair of clamps and pliers and my full weight applied.

Now for the cons. Due to how the thermal pathway is manufactured, there's an indentation on the back of the board. This means you need to use more thermal paste/epoxy, and you need to be more careful not to introduce air bubbles and gaps. On the aluminum boards, there is no solder pad on the back side, which would help greatly since solders tend to be more conductive than thermal pastes and adhesives. The copper board likely wouldn't need it, since copper is easy to solder. Speaking of copper, there are a distinct lack of copper options for many of their PCB choices. While this is understandable (many of these LEDs simply don't need it) the ability to have broader choice in materials would be nice. My final bad note is the difference between prototype boards I have versus some of the production boards. An older X-Lamp XR-E board had four screw holes for improved mounting, and they were placed so that most screws that could fit those holes would not have the heads short out on the contact pads. These holes are nonexistent on the star and disc boards. The star have their electrical contact points too close to the indents at the outside to allow screws to be attached there, but the circular boards look like they might have a better chance.

Overall, this is a solid piece of thermal management tech for LEDs. The ease of use and durability should appeal to a wide variety of LED consumers, from hobbyists, designers, and engineers to police, military, and even more groups of people and industries. Most of the cons are personal nitpicks and aren't exactly game-breaking important, and the pros certainly outweigh any con I've been able to notice. Highly recommended.

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SinkPAD & CREE, Together At Last!

Khyber Khyber writes  |  about a year and a half ago

I finally got the right boards personally delivered to me. It was quite funny, exchanging tiny baggies of what any person at least ten feet away would assume were drugs right in the middle of a Del Taco parking lot. Then watching an accident happen not fifteen feet from us, between bicyclist and car.

Anyways, I just shot a little run of the MK-R, both of them, driven at 18w each. Note how they obliterate the Cree XR-E to the left, driven at 1.2-1.3w or so (3.7V rated Vf @ 350mA.)

I'm going to go step outside to get a night shot. Updates later in this journal post, in the comments.

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Night Test of the MK-R

Khyber Khyber writes  |  about a year and a half ago

Finally got around to doing a night test of the MK-R.

I went out onto my patio, and put it right beside my 100w incan that typically lights the porch.

And here's the result. As you can see, absolutely no contest. Fluoro equivalent to 100w incan is a ~26w bulb, so we're looking at around 25% the power consumption of an equivalent CFL (LED driven at 6w) and way, way more light.

Still unable to drive full power. SinkPad mistakenly sent me XM-L boards, not MK-R.

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Checking Out The New Cree MK-R LED

Khyber Khyber writes  |  about a year and a half ago

I managed to get some engineering samples of the Cree MKR LED announced on /. a couple weeks or so back.

Needless to say, I was thoroughly impressed. I ran 12V @ 200mA, 500mA, and 1250mA. You know how us geeks/nerds say do not look into laser with remaining eye? You don't HAVE any eyes left with the new MK-R, even at a measly 200mA of direct current at 12V. At 1250 mA, I only needed half a second before the diode packaging began to melt the green PCB, the heatsink was absolutely ineffective. Be prepared to use metal SMD-mount boards for these diodes, because that cheap green board used for most SMD LEDs simply will not cut it. Pushing 15w in a 7mm x 7mm package, you need serious heat dissipation capabilities. Also, DO NOT HOLD THE DIODE WHEN DRIVING AT 200mA! You will blister yourself.

I no longer have my light meter, as I would use that to check flux levels and lumen levels, but needless to say, you drop a quad of very-efficient nearly 4-watt diodes into a single tight array like this, and the world is going to light up before your eyes. I would love to see one of these in a Mag-Lite. At 200mA, 500mA, and 1250mA, you would have all the light you need. Remember that commercial where the kids with the flashlight are using new Energizer batteries and it looks like they're suddenly using a 1,000,000 candlepower light? It's even better than that.

Just one of these would light up my entire 15' x 24' living room, quite possibly more, with wonderful light levels. I could see this sitting in the center of my ceiling. Two bedrooms, two bathrooms, living room, kitchen, dining room. Seven rooms, 105w operating power with all in operation. I could leave my whole home lit up for the same cost of a single 100w incandescent light bulb, which barely lights one room. Oh wait, I forgot the porch and patio. Make that 135w operating power. And in reality, even at 500mA drive current, I think that's more than enough light for an area roughly 25' x 25'. Still beating the pants off of equivalent incandescent or fluorescent. It's the end of them, and I already have the belief that these will truly smash HID systems.

I want single-color versions of these. Cree, if you're reading/listening, you have technology in your hands right now to take over an entire segment of the optoelectronic market. You dropped out of said market (and a couple of others) when you quit making 660nm diodes, and you could really take this class of diode to great heights if you could specialize single-wavelength versions of this.

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Gearheads!!!!!!

Khyber Khyber writes  |  more than 2 years ago

So I just popped 175K on my '98 Taurus. I'm quite pleased with this vehicle. The AC is dead, and I've only had to replace the transmission once at 125K, when the planetary gear chewed itself to shit going to Washington back in 2008.

Any other gearheads reading this journal? What're you driving, and what're you pushing mileage-wise?

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Regarding the Last.fm/Skype debacle

Khyber Khyber writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Took me a while, but after more careful digging, I've figured out what is happening. Last.fm is indeed lying. They are not listening to your media players. They are listening to your sound card output. Disabling sounds in Skype will disable every Skype event log except for two - updates to mood/music playing, and any time you make a skype call. Those to events trigger Last.fm logging. In the log, there's no real identifying information. What can be gleaned, though, is how long you made that call.

"If you choose to download the Last.fm software, it will monitor all the music you listen to on your computer (even if you are not online). It will then send this information to Last.fm via Audioscrobbler. This information will then be integrated into Last.fm to enhance the depth of your record collection and the accuracy of your profile.

The Last.fm software cannot and will not collect and transfer any other information from your computer other than as described above."

That is a flat-out LIE. And you're not even told about the integration with Skype when you install Last.fm's Audioscrobbler. You have to find out yourself by looking through log files, or go back to an obscure 2006 Skype Blog post.

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Rethinking Green Light in Targeted-Wavelength Horticulture

Khyber Khyber writes  |  more than 2 years ago

After a little tiff with some angry man over on Reddit, I had to go conduct a few experiments of my own regarding the effectiveness of green light on photosynthesis.

To get to the meat of it all, between ~450 - 1800 umol, green light tends to drive photosynthesis more efficiently than red and blue light, especially in plants with much thicker leaves, like actual trees, succulents, cacti, etc. A tiny bit higher than 1800 umol, and your ROI drops rapidly as you've pretty much hit saturation of the chloroplasts, for all ranges of light. The law of Diminishing Returns comes to bite us in the butt, and no wavelength is ultimately more efficient than any other, and in fact, you begin reaching damaging levels of photon saturation which can burn a plant.

Now, there are multiple food crops that have an optimal light requirement below 500 umol. Multiple types of lettuce grow very well with ~200 umol, for an example. For that purpose, LED lights using red and blue light do well more than simply suffice. For rooting cuttings, red and blue light works very well. Fruiting plants typically require much more light, Jalapenos like it around 1500 umol. I've grown nice-sized jalapenos, bigger than what I'll find in most supermarkets, under a red and blue only panel, but I suspect I might be able to do a bit better with some focused green light. I'll do that when I get one made with equivalent specs.

Of course, getting to that intensity for larger plants will likely require me going solid white with a carefully-tuned color temperature. I have seen units now that on equal power draw with their HID counterparts are beating them by roughly 20%. However, these still require either EXTREMELY LARGE or very exotic cooling systems for anything over 300w and in a reasonably small package, and are not totally feasible for either green house or consumer gardening, this will likely be stuck in the parking light/street light arena for a while.

I have seen the benefits of green light, but there isn't MUCH additional benefit versus splitting up into different LED modules so you can get the light deeper into the canopy with the red/blue units. Perhaps for those doing bonsai, or growing cacti, and possibly underwater corals/plants, there is a good use, I can see it. Well, at least I'm sure of why an HPS works rather well despite having a very 'poor' spectral output. It's more than just the 660-680nm + IR that it dumps in massive quantities, it is also the green light having its own effective role.

Kinda goes totally against the conventional knowledge that red and blue are the most efficient, eh?

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McQuown vs Cervantes!

Khyber Khyber writes  |  more than 2 years ago

So Jorge Cervantes did a Reddit AMA. And he went on to say LED is not as good as CFL or HID.

As you see in the response to that post, I didn't let that slide, at all.

Don't dare talk shit about my profession when you're totally uninformed about the subject.

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