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Man Digs Out Basement Using Radio Controlled Toy Tractors

Kilrah_il Re:Math seems wrong (169 comments)

Let's hope nobody uses the article's author for the next mars mission.

more than 2 years ago
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Antibiotics Are Useless In Treating Most Sinus Infections

Kilrah_il Re:slashdot title also written by a moron (377 comments)

If I may offer you a small advice, as an ENT doctor, use nasal irrigation. Many studies have showed that it is as important as antibiotics in the treatment of sinusitis.
Good luck!

more than 2 years ago
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How Doctors Die

Kilrah_il Re:This is where western medicine has failed... (646 comments)

In an ideal world, I agree with you. But if a family of a terminal patient tells me to do anything I can to "save him" and I refuse, after he dies, you can bet on them suing my ass off. Until this issue gets settled, I will have to do my best to convince the patient's family about him having no chance, but in the end, do as they wish... sometimes to the patients detriment. Sad, but true.

more than 2 years ago
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How Doctors Die

Kilrah_il Re:This is where western medicine has failed... (646 comments)

As a physician, I can tell you that many times I have faced patients that should have been given the chance to die peacefully, but the family have kept pressing me to "do something". Usually, I try to make them understand that at times like this it is best to just let Grandma die in peace and not prolong her suffering. Mostly I fail. And when after all the explaining the family keeps telling me to do something, I cannot disregard them (I do plan on keeping my license, you know?).
I don't think it's so much that western medicine failed, as it is that layman's expectations of medicine are unrealistic.

more than 2 years ago
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Mastercard, Visa To Help Target Ads

Kilrah_il Re:If you have nothing to hide (222 comments)

Actually, I partially agree with your sentiment. I worry more about privacy on the personal level and not on the corporate, world-spanning level. To clarify:
I don't give a rat's ass what Visa knows about me, and what Google collects about my searches and what info they get from it. Corporations want to spend millions of $$$ to harvest all my online activities and send me ads in my mail or on a site I visit? Let them have their fun. I don't give a damn. May they grow old and die chocking on their money, for all I care.
For me privacy is that only people I know can link my name to what I do (job, hobbies, friends, purchases, etc.). On this site, if you go through all my posts you can only find out which country I live in, my job and 1-2 of my hobbies, that's all. That's privacy. If some company aggregates all my actions on-line (or credit card purchases) in one big file, I don't mind; it's not like it's on some big bulletin board for my grandma to find.

Oh, and BTW, for years now I get ads and coupons in my monthly CC statement, usually targeted to stuff I buy, how is it different from what the summary mentions?

about 3 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: Linux or Windows for a new computer

Kilrah_il Re:Motivation for change (13 comments)

When I was a teenager I had about 5-6 OSs installed on my computer simultaneously (Windows, Linux, OS/2, etc.). Call it a hobby. Do I get geek creds for that? Unfortunately, those days are over. Nowadays I'm too busy to fool around too much with the computer. I prefer to have it as a tool, not a hobby (mostly a tool, you can't take the fun out of it completely).
So, yes, I am into mostly practical reasons, but I am not afraid to get my hands a bit dirty. As mcgrew said above, Linux machines are more secure. If on top of that, they don't slow down over time, like Windows machines do, it just might be worth my effort to try Linux.

more than 3 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: Linux or Windows for a new computer

Kilrah_il Re:Depends (13 comments)

One last question: One of the things that annoy me in Windows is that over time the OS gets progressively slower. Usually every year I do a complete clean install of the OS. Does Linux have the same problem or does it still run the same after a year compared to day 1? If this is a non-issue in Linux, it will really win me over.
Thanks

more than 3 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: Linux or Windows for a new computer

Kilrah_il Re:Popcorn (13 comments)

Actually, that was the one reason why I was reluctant to submit this question. I was afraid to come off as +5 Flamebait :)

more than 3 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: Linux or Windows for a new computer

Kilrah_il Re:Depends (13 comments)

Thanks for the thorough reply.
I just want to mention that I know a bit Linux, since in my teens (mid-90's) I experimented in installing different OSs on my computer, including Linux. But now, I guess my experimenting days are over and I want to see if I have any good reason to work at learning a new system (even though today it takes less to learn how to work with Linux). I think that for me the strongest point is the security one. It sure as hell will make my life easier, not having to worry (much) about trojans, virus and stuff.

The reason I am against dual-boot is because I just want my computer to have what I need. Since all my apps (pretty standard, nothing exclusive) can run on either OS, I don't see a reason to start each day with "what OS shall I work with today?".

more than 3 years ago
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Pi Computed To 10 Trillion Digits

Kilrah_il Re:What Does This Mean? (414 comments)

I can calculate any digit of pi in binary off the top of my head with 50% accuracy.

more than 3 years ago
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Psystar Loses Appeal In Apple Case

Kilrah_il Re:That's too bad... (258 comments)

"Abuse copyright" - You mean, tried to protect their original software? It's not like the RIAA trying to milk what they can from artists' work. It's a company making money off its own product. Doesn't sound like abuse; more like the original purpose of copyright (you know, promoting innovation and stuff?)
"Monopoly" - With less than 10% of OS market-share, it's hard to call it a monopoly. Maybe monopoly in Mac OS worlds, but it's their own development, and they can choose not to give other companies licenses to sell it. It's a perfectly reasonable business decision.
"DRM" - That is correct, they used DRM, but at least in order to protect their proprietary software, so it's not that evil, IMHO.
"Abused DMCA" - Actually, they used the DMCA exactly as it is written. You may not agree with this law (I don't), but the blame is not on Apple, but on the lawmakers. Talk to them.

So we are left with (maybe) 1 evil, more like 1/2. Better luck next time.

more than 3 years ago
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State Dept. Employee Investigated For Linking To WikiLeaks

Kilrah_il Re:What classified information? (172 comments)

I just love this Streisand Effect. It means that no one can ever act anything wrong bad done to them, because people will notice. I think it's bullshit. Yes, the effect is real, but just because it is, it doesn't mean the Government (for example) shouldn't act against an employee violating his work terms.

more than 3 years ago
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MRI Magnets Cause Nystagmus

Kilrah_il Re:Weird (120 comments)

Wood is matter. Does wood react to magnetic fields? Just because the body is made from matter, does not mean that anything can affect it.
Just to be clear, I do not say that magnetic fields do not affect the ear, I'm just saying that the fact that the body is matter does not mean it automatically does.

more than 3 years ago
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Training an Immune System To Kill Cancer

Kilrah_il Re:Okay, what about prevention? (209 comments)

Actually, there is no problem in taking some person's bone marrow (or rather, bone marrow progenitor cells), save them and return it to him after the treatment is over; this is the basis for bone marrow transplantation. The problem is choosing between transplanting the person's own bone marrow or another person's. In the former case, you run the risk of having cancer cells hiding in the bone marrow and having a recurrence of the disease; in the later, you have to deal with using immuncompromising medications for the rest of the life. Either way, it's a hard treatment with large mortality and is reserved for severe cases of Leukemia.

more than 3 years ago
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Find My IPhone Used To Locate Plane Crash In Chile

Kilrah_il Re:Bah! (95 comments)

A webOS phone would have aborted the flight soon after take-off.

more than 3 years ago
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Suggesting Innovative Uses For Retired Space Shuttles

Kilrah_il Re:This article is... (127 comments)

You spent 2 minutes on this slideshow??? You should practice your speedclicking skills, ASAP.

more than 3 years ago
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Android User Spends 60 Days In WebOS Land

Kilrah_il Re:Comparison? (137 comments)

On a related note, here is a WebOS user who came home to find his house broken into and all his tech stuff stolen. He now relates how he gets by with only a HP TouchPad. Some of the points you raised are addressed by him from a user's perspective.

more than 3 years ago

Submissions

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Copyright Claim Setbacks Cognitive Impairment Dete

Kilrah_il Kilrah_il writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Kilrah_il (1692978) writes "A recent New England Journal of Medicine editorial talks about the mini-mental state examination — a standardized screening test for cognitive impairment. After years of being widely used, the original authors claim to own copyright on the test and "a licensed version of the MMSE can now be purchased [...] for $1.23 per test. The MMSE form is gradually disappearing from textbooks, Web sites, and clinical tool kits." The article goes on to describe the working of copyright law and various alternative licenses, including GNU Free Documentation License and ends with the following suggestion: "We suggest that authors of widely used clinical tools provide explicit permissive licensing, ideally with a form of copyleft. Any new tool developed with public funds should be required to use a copyleft or similar license to guarantee the freedom to distribute and improve it, similar to the requirement for open-access publication of research funded by the National Institutes of Health.""
Link to Original Source
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Ask Slashdot: Linux or Windows for a new computer

Kilrah_il Kilrah_il writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Kilrah_il (1692978) writes "I just bought a new computer and I have a small dilemma: Do I install Windows or Linux? On the one hand, I have all my programs for Winows so I already know them and can set up my computer just the way I like it pretty quickly. On the other hand, Linux, and especially Ubuntu, are getting better in terms of usability and it could be nice to check it out. I don't want to dual boot since I want in the end to have a computer that has all I need on 1 OS. Are there any strong arguments in favor of one OS over the other?
Keep in mind that a) I have licenses for all my applications so the cost is not an issue (for now), and b) I prefer practical reasons. "OSS is good and MS is bad" is not a factor for me. Thanks!"
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Boys Reach Sexual Maturity Earlier Than In The Pas

Kilrah_il Kilrah_il writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Kilrah_il (1692978) writes "While it has long been known that girls reach sexual maturity at a progressively earlier age, drawing the same conclusion regarding boys has been hard due to the lack of a clear-cut way to evaluate puberty. Now, researcher have used a known secondary marker of puberty, the accident hump, to study boys' maturity. "The accident hump, which also exists among male apes, occurs because young men participate in particularly risky behaviour when the release of the hormone testosterone reaches its maximum. Dangerous and reckless shows of strength, negligence, and a high propensity to violence lead to an increased number of fatal accidents. The probability remains low, but the rate jumps up considerably.""
Link to Original Source
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How We Redefined The Term Terrorist

Kilrah_il Kilrah_il writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Kilrah_il (1692978) writes "In the wake of the terrorist attack in Norway, a heated debate was raised about the use of the term "terrorist" and how it was changed by some media sources once the attacker was found to be not-Muslim. Radio Freethinker has an interesting four part series (parts 2, 3 and 4) examining the meaning of the term "terrorist" and how it has changed in the last decade. "Thanks to (or in spite of) our Norwegian terrorist, we have had the opportunity to investigate what Terrorism has come to mean in our society. Through the trauma of fear and pain we have allowed our culture to transform a word to describe an act of violence into a dehumanizing term of racism. The extreme right has latched on to the ‘struggle of civilization’has concocted this ‘epic’ struggle in a (sadly successful) attempt to distract us from the true ills in our society. They have created the ‘OTHER’ that we must all sacrifice everything to defeat.""
Link to Original Source
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Stanford Students Build JediBot

Kilrah_il Kilrah_il writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Kilrah_il (1692978) writes "What do you get when you combine a robotic arm, Kinect and a lightsaber (sorta)? The JediBot. Designed by Stanford University students as part of an experimental robotics course, the robot can execute one of pre-defined attack moves or block any attack aimed at it. "To attack, JediBot performs a random attack move, and if it meets resistance — another lightsaber, a skull, some ribs — it recoils and performs another, seemingly random, attack... To defend, the JediBot uses the Kinect sensor to pick the green lightsaber out of the background... and performs depth analysis to work out where it is in comparison to the robot’s lightsaber.""
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Olympic Games Team Trademarks '2012'

Kilrah_il Kilrah_il writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Kilrah_il (1692978) writes "Next August, an art event called the Great Exhibition 2012 is planned to take place. Now, the organizers of the Olympic games are pursuing legal action against the organizers of the exhibition in order to force them to stop using the number '2012'. Julie Benson, the organizer of the event says: "It's preposterous — they are threatening to take me to court if I don't drop 2012 from my application for the trademark." After they pass this hurdle, I wonder what the Mayans will say..."
Link to Original Source
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The Modern Day Renaissance Man

Kilrah_il Kilrah_il writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Kilrah_il (1692978) writes "Not Exactly Rocker Science has an interesting piece about Erez Lieberman Aiden, a scientist that is frequently hopping from one field to another, including "molecular biology, linguistics, physics, engineering and mathematics." This is in contrast to the prevailing trend of specializing in a specific field. "... I think a huge amount of invention is recognising that A and B go together really well, putting them together and getting something better. The limiting step is knowing that A and B exist. And that’s the big disadvantage that one has as a specialist – you gradually lose sight of the things that are around. I feel I just get to see more." Read on to see how failure to map antibodies led to an important discovery of the 3D folding of DNA and how the study of irregular verbs created a new scientific field."
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Using Smartphones To Fight Malaria

Kilrah_il Kilrah_il writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Kilrah_il (1692978) writes "With a million deaths attributed to it annually, Malaria is still a major health problem in some parts of the world, especially sub-Saharan Africa. Recently, HP and the non-profit organization Ping (Positive Innovation for the Next Generation) have teamed to help the people of Botswana to fight Malaria with Smartphones. "The program works by equipping healthcare workers in different regions with smartphones (Palm Pre 2) and access to the cloud. As they encounter cases of malaria, they can access a database on the cloud and send details about the outbreak, including pictures, notes, and map coordinates." With the program proving successful, the plan is now to spread its use to other diseases and countries."
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New Google Tool To Find Trend Correlations

Kilrah_il Kilrah_il writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Kilrah_il (1692978) writes "In 2008 Google found correlation between seasonal flu activity and certain search term, a finding that allowed it to track flu activity better and more rapidly than previous methods. Now, Google is offering a new tool, Google Correlate, that allows researched to do the same for other trends. "Using Correlate, you can upload your own data series and see a list of search terms whose popularity best corresponds with that real world trend." Of course, Google reminds us that correlation does not imply causation."
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Video Games Are Art

Kilrah_il Kilrah_il writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Kilrah_il (1692978) writes "The National Endowment for the Arts recently published their criteria for next year's Arts in Media grants. One of the key changes is the inclusion of video games as works of art. "Projects may include high profile multi-part or single television and radio programs (documentaries and dramatic narratives); media created for theatrical release; performance programs; artistic segments for use within an existing series; multi-part webisodes; installations; and interactive games. Short films, five minutes and under, will be considered in packages of three or more." For those who worry that game companies will try to get a grant for a commercial game, notice that the grant is only for non-profit organizations."
Link to Original Source
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Why Don't Let Facts Stand In The Way Of Opinion

Kilrah_il Kilrah_il writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Kilrah_il (1692978) writes ""A man with conviction is a hard man to change. Tell him you disagree and he turns away. Show him facts or figures and he questions your sources. Appeal to logic and he fails to see your point." With this statement Chris Mooney opens an exciting piece on why it's so hard to change people's mind, even if all the facts and science are on your side. Relevent to everything from climate change-denialists to the anti-vax movement; a must read for every Slashdot commentor."
Link to Original Source
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Full Body Scanners Radiation Risk Evaluated

Kilrah_il Kilrah_il writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Kilrah_il (1692978) writes "X-ray backscatter devices have caused un uproar over 2 issues: Privacy and radiation risk. A recent Archives of Internal Medicine article researched the radiation risk. The results: A single scan is equal to 3-9 minutes of natural background radiation exposure and would raise the amount of radiation a person is exposed to on a 6-hour intercontinental flight by about 1%. As for cancer risk, 1 million people flying 10 times a week will have 4 additional cases of cancer (using current models of radiation-cancer association). This is compared to the 600 cases of cancer they will get from the flight itself and to the 400,00 cases these people will have over their lifetime. However, the article notes: "
In medicine, we try to balance risks and benefits of everything we do, and thus while the risks are indeed exceedingly small, the scanners should not be deployed unless they provide benefit—improved national security and safety—and consideration of these issues is outside the scope of our expertise." The article also chastises TSA for not allowing independent assessment of the machines' safe operation."

Link to Original Source
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GLOBE at Night Aims to Map Global Light Pollution

Kilrah_il Kilrah_il writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Kilrah_il (1692978) writes "Light pollution is a big problem this days, affecting not only astronomers and wild life, but also everyone else because of wasted energy. GLOBE at Night aims to raise awareness by urging people to go outside and find out how much light pollution there is in their area. "The campaign is easy and fun to do. First, you match the appearance of the constellation Orion in the first campaign (and Leo or Crux in the second campaign) with simple star maps of progressively fainter stars found. Then you submit your measurements, including the date, time, and location of your comparison. After all the campaign’s observations are submitted, the project’s organizers release a map of light-pollution levels worldwide.""
Link to Original Source
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HP Donates to WebOS's Major Hombrewing Group

Kilrah_il Kilrah_il writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Kilrah_il (1692978) writes "WebOS Internals Group is the central repository for all the homebrewing done on the WebOS platform, including apps, patches and kernels. Recently it became clear that server infrastructure would fall behind future progress in the WebOS world. "So they asked HP's Phil McKinney, who has arranged to donate an HP Proliant DL385 2u server with 32 gigs of RAM and 8 terabytes of disk space... Notably, this is a straight-up donation, no strings attached — so WebOS Internals will remain how they always have: completely independent from the company whose OS they hack on.""
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Yad Vashem Holocust Archive Available With Google

Kilrah_il Kilrah_il writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Kilrah_il (1692978) writes "Yad Vashem, the Jerusalem-based center for remembering the Holocaust's victims and survivors, has a massive archive of pictures and documents. Up until now, all those documents were available only in physical form. Recently Google partnered with Yad Vashem to make all those documents available through a collection site.
"Within the archive you will find more than 130,000 images in full resolution. You can search for them via a custom search engine on Yad Vashem’s collections site. And by using experimental optical character recognition (OCR), we’ve transcribed the text on many images, making them even more discoverable on the web...Yad Vashem encourages you to add personal stories about images that have meaning for you in the 'share your thoughts' section below each item.""

Link to Original Source
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Video Celebration 100y of IBM

Kilrah_il Kilrah_il writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Kilrah_il (1692978) writes "2011 will be IBM's 100th anniversary, and in celebration, it has produced a video remembering famous projects. "Want to know who the self-confessed "mother of the motherboard" is? Or why every piece of organically farmed, tenderly loved food at your local Trader Joe's has a barcode on it? Or perhaps you're curious to learn more about how millions of airline reservations can be made around the world with unfailing reliability?""
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Engadget Leaks HP/Palm's New Slates, HP Responds

Kilrah_il Kilrah_il writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Kilrah_il (1692978) writes "HP has been building some hype towards it Feb. 9th event, titled "Think Big. Think Small. Think Beyond". Now Engadget has received internal renders of the upcoming PalmPad, which will come in two version: a 9" Topaz and 7" Opal. "We're told that units will start to arrive at Palm HQ in June as production ramps up for launch later this year — a timeline backed up by an internal marketing slide we received that lists WiFi-only, AT&T 3G, and Verizon LTE versions of the Opal arriving in September 2011, and on AT&T LTE in July 2012". both units will feature 1.2GHz processors. Topaz will probably ship earlier than Opal, which is reasonable given that a September launch date may be too late to reclaim meaningful marketshare.
In a response HP has issued a statement "Think you saw the latest on Engadget? Think again". Things just got interesting."

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Instructions Can Hinder Children Self-Explorations

Kilrah_il Kilrah_il writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Kilrah_il (1692978) writes "How best to educate children? Do we tell them what we think they need to know or do we let them explore on their own, aimlessly? A recent study (warning: paywall), tried to answer this question by building a toy with many features and letting children play with it. One group of children got a lesson beforehand by study author, Elizabeth Bonawitz, a lesson that showed the working of one feature of the toy. The other group didn't get any instruction.
The children which got a lesson played with what they were shown, but didn't try other features, while the other group discovered on their own all the features of the game."

Link to Original Source
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Picaso Inspiration For Mac Finder Icon?

Kilrah_il Kilrah_il writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Kilrah_il (1692978) writes "Cattani Simone, an Italian blogger, noticed an interesting tidbit: The Mac Finder icon is very similar to one of the figures in Picasso's "Two Charaters" painting. "... looking at those I felt there was something strange. Do you notice anything familiar? The icon of the Macintosh Finder seems very similar to the face of one of the characters of the work of the Spanish artist".
The program was part of the MacOS from 1984, but ExtremeTech could not confirm when the icon made its debut or who designed it. Any former-Apple designers in the crowd to help us out?"

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