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Windows 10 IE With Spartan Engine Performance Vs. Chrome and Firefox

KingMotley Re:its a good thing (173 comments)

And almost noone that was working there in the 90s is still there. There is hardly anything the same in Microsoft as it was back then, except the name of course.

2 days ago
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Windows 10 IE With Spartan Engine Performance Vs. Chrome and Firefox

KingMotley Re:The problem is the interface (173 comments)

Not sure what the problem you have with firefox bookmarks. To use them, just click it. Arranging them, just drag them into the order you want them, or drag them (in the order you want) in your bookmarks toolbar.

2 days ago
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Police Organization Wants Cop-Spotting Dropped From Waze App

KingMotley Re:Simple solution (461 comments)

I'll even go one further, and say that according to their study, you are SAFEST (on the freeway) traveling 15MPH over the average speed. A "U"-shaped curve happens surrounding that point where it is approximately as safe to drive 30MPH over the average speed on the freeway as it is to drive the speed limit on normal streets.

2 days ago
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Police Organization Wants Cop-Spotting Dropped From Waze App

KingMotley Re:Simple solution (461 comments)

Sure. It was really hard to google "NTSA studies speed" and click the first link, but here you go:
  http://lmgtfy.com/?q=NHTSA+stu...

Direct link:http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0CB4QFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nhtsa.gov%2Fpeople%2Finjury%2Fenforce%2FSpeed_Forum_Presentations%2FFerguson.pdf&ei=qrjHVNy0C8OkgwTDuIHQCg&usg=AFQjCNGC1ELU62qSlGqu5aHElfXjNglI4g&sig2=H8dxIRK6EENhrYUXok6L1Q&bvm=bv.84349003,d.eXY

SInce you couldn't take the time to google, I'll even give you the excerpt:

Low-speed drivers were more likely to be involved in
crashes than relatively high speed drivers

2 days ago
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UHD Spec Stomps on Current Blu-ray Spec, But Will Consumers Notice?

KingMotley Re: I won't notice (332 comments)

I can't recall a time in which it refered to anything else. Here's another example from 1985: the original Atari at service manual. http://www.atarimania.com/docu...

So it has been in use for at least 30 years. Not exactly "new". If you can find another reference before that in which it talks about resolution being described in pixel density (which would be hard I imagine as screens didn't have pixels back then). You might be able to find a reference to a tv (which isn't the same field) describing resolution in terms of lines, but again, lines isn't density either.

3 days ago
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NVIDIA Responds To GTX 970 Memory Bug

KingMotley Re:Hey! I've been gypped! (145 comments)

QEMM's optimize was awesome back in the day. It'd get me 95% of the way there.

4 days ago
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UHD Spec Stomps on Current Blu-ray Spec, But Will Consumers Notice?

KingMotley Re:I won't notice (332 comments)

Your blind test isn't actually testing to see if people can tell the difference between 1080p and 4k. It's testing to see if people can correctly identify which is which. That's not the same thing.

A better blind-study is to have two TVs placed side by side of the same make and model. Turn off all upsampling and then show a 1080p image on one and a 4K image on the other alternating randomly the which is which and have the participant identify which image looks better. You will have a much different result, and have proven that people can tell the difference quite easily.

4 days ago
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UHD Spec Stomps on Current Blu-ray Spec, But Will Consumers Notice?

KingMotley Re:I won't notice (332 comments)

Let's try an example. Enter "resolution" into google. What does it say?

the degree of sharpness of a computer-generated image as measured by the number of dots per linear inch in a hard-copy printout or the number of pixels across and down on a display screen. Their resolution never failed them, their fervour seemed never slackened.

Google says you are wrong.

Let's see what Microsoft says. Right click your desktop, and choose "Screen Resolution". What does it say? Microsoft says:

Resolution: 2560x1440 (Recommended)

Boy those silly software guys must have got it all wrong. Let's check the hardware guys... How about dell?
http://accessories.us.dell.com...

Under tech spec, that monitor says:

Native Resolution 1920 x 1200

Guess the hardware guys are wrong too. So who uses it the one true "Jane Q. Public" way?

4 days ago
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UHD Spec Stomps on Current Blu-ray Spec, But Will Consumers Notice?

KingMotley Re:I won't notice (332 comments)

That's exactly what it means: resolution is the number of pixels, always has been.

No it doesn't. It's the measurable degree of detail.

Yes it does. It's the number of pixels available on the screen, usually described in WxH.

4 days ago
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UHD Spec Stomps on Current Blu-ray Spec, But Will Consumers Notice?

KingMotley Re:I won't notice (332 comments)

Don't misuse the word then try to tell me it "always has been". That's just plain false. "Never was" would be closer to the truth.

Resolution has always referred to the number of pixels available on the screen.

Dictionary.com:

1. the maximum number of pixels that can be displayed on a monitor, expressed as (number of horizontal pixels) x (number of vertical pixels), i.e., 1024x768. The ratio of horizontal to vertical resolution is usually 4:3, the same as that of conventional television sets.

In windows, when you go the screen resolution dialog, you tell it how many pixels by how many pixels your display is. It's been that way since Windows 2.0 back in 1987.

4 days ago
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Silk Road Journal Found On Ulbricht's Laptop: "Everyone Knows Too Much"

KingMotley Re:What an idiot (180 comments)

Sort of like windows-L?

Too bad he wasn't running windows. Linux is so insecure.

about a week ago
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Insurance Company Dongles Don't Offer Much Assurance Against Hacking

KingMotley Re:Spoofing! (199 comments)

Perhaps it was perceived, but they determined that the market of people willing to face fines and possible imprisonment so that they can save $10 in their insurance wasn't big enough to warrant the expense of building all that extra security in.

about two weeks ago
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Elon Musk Plans To Build Hyperloop Test Track

KingMotley Re:Nevada (165 comments)

Actually, a great location would be fermi-lab in Batavia, IL. Plenty of space there considering they built it for the large collider, in fact, he could probably build it right above the collider ring and there should be very little no/resistance and no environmental impact. Not to mention the near access to some of the countries best minds right on campus.

about two weeks ago
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Wireless Keylogger Masquerades as USB Phone Charger

KingMotley Re:Dewhat? (150 comments)

When I was in the USAF I had great fun telling users that they could have a wireless keyboard & mouse just as soon as they found FIPS 140-2 compliant ones. I then told them that not only do none exist to our knowledge, but none are planned. The main problem being once you put serious encryption in there(as 140-2 requires), you're looking at a keyboard/mouse that are closer to smartphones than keyboards. IE a AA won't last a few months, you'll need to charge it like you do your smartphone. AES encryption also isn't intended for 8-16 bits at a time, so it's not really efficient there.

That's easy to solve. Since the keyboard and mouse are very likely near a PC, just run a charging cable to one of it's USB ports and never disconnect it. Then you can get rid of the battery completely. Problem solved. Then you've got a nice battery-less, always charged wireless keyboard and mouse. Tada!

about two weeks ago
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Critical Git Security Vulnerability Announced

KingMotley Re:Unrelated to Github (148 comments)

WTF is Git? Is that a new fork of git? Cause I can't tell what you are talking about because you put the wrong case.

about a month and a half ago
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Touring a Carnival Cruise Simulator: 210 Degrees of GeForce-Powered Projection

KingMotley 882 foot Titanic (42 comments)

Yes, a modern cruise ship does indeed "kill it". In length, volume, speed, height, and weight. You could probably fit 8-10 titanics in the AVERAGE modern cruise ship.

about a month and a half ago
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Judge Rules Drug Maker Cannot Halt Sales of Alzheimer's Medicine

KingMotley Re:Can you say... (266 comments)

Emergency Rooms don't need to treat minor ailments. They only need to treat someone if they have something threatening, and they can not be safely transferred to another hospital.

about a month and a half ago
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Microsoft's New Windows Monetization Methods Could Mean 'Subscriptions'

KingMotley They abandoned this already (415 comments)

And a legal license to use them only for development or testing, and not to be used as your main computer OS. Guess you forgot that part.

about 1 month ago
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Microsoft's New Windows Monetization Methods Could Mean 'Subscriptions'

KingMotley Maybe they should focus on... (415 comments)

Why would you care about the log files being fragmented? Do you even know what file fragmentation is, and why that image and complaints are pretty silly?

about 1 month ago
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Apple DRM Lawsuit Might Be Dismissed: Plaintiffs Didn't Own Affected iPods

KingMotley Re:Not unexpected. (141 comments)

It uses the EXACT same part (down to the model number), and we're wondering why Kawasaki hasn't done a recall on theirs.

Because often the specification isn't bad, but the manufacturing process had a defect that only affected a specific run or a batch. It is quite possible that even with the same part number that one batch sold was defective while another was not.

Usually, this can be attributed to production lines using materials to their absolute limit (stamps, presses, drill bits, etc) to try and maximize profit. Occasionally one goes just enough out of spec to slip by QA, but then is corrected in the next batch after the worn production parts are replaced.

about 2 months ago

Submissions

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AppleTV Generation 3 sells out in record time

KingMotley KingMotley writes  |  more than 2 years ago

KingMotley (944240) writes "Although generally overshadowed by the iPad 3 debut, Apple also introduced the third incarnation of its Apple TV streaming media players this week. The third-generation Apple TV adds full 1080 support, a much faster processor, and much to its predecessor, and a completely revamped icon based UI. The revamped UI and faster processor (the same as from the iPhone 4) is leading some to believe that the device may be headed down a path where it may get its own place in Apple's App store eventually, embracing 3rd party apps. Considering how little effort Apple has put forth for the product, even Apple must have been take by surprise when all available stock for the revamped device sold out in under 8 hours."
Link to Original Source
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IE Making Come Back After EU Ballot

KingMotley KingMotley writes  |  more than 4 years ago

KingMotley (944240) writes ""Most PC users hit the web using Internet Explorer by default, simply because it just works. Now, after antitrust investigations, European users were given a choice of browser to install via ballot screen, and initial reports are great for 'ol IE. According to Statcounter, IE use in the UK has gone up 3.39 percent since last month's implementation of the ballot, 1.54 percent in Italy, and 1.76 percent in Germany. It's still early days, and it'll take more than this for IE to reclaim it's 95 percent lead in the browser war, but it's certainly a good trend for Microsoft. With that in mind, we're going to have to ask you to place your bets now. As a side note, all other major browsers (Firefox, Chrome, and Opera) have seen a dip in their usage for the same period.""
Link to Original Source

Journals

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W3C group

KingMotley KingMotley writes  |  about 2 years ago

Why is there separate properties for each side of a border, but not for the outline property which is mostly the same thing but it doesn't affect layout? (sigh).

WTB outline-top-width, outline-top-color, outline-top-style, etc.

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W3C group at it again

KingMotley KingMotley writes  |  about 2 years ago

While writing HTML5, the W3C group seems to have broken compatibility with HTML 4 again. No longer can you specify colspan='0' on a td tag to let it span the rest of the row. (sigh) I guess it wasn't all that important since only firefox ever implemented it correctly in the first place. Opera did support rowspan='0' as well, but that is no longer valid in HTML 5 either.

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FIrefox buggy transition support

KingMotley KingMotley writes  |  about 2 years ago

Firefox misinterprets the CSS3's Editors draft and ignores any CSS properties (like transition) where an angle or time specification is given as simply 0. All other browsers accept 0 for the time specification, and the CSS 3 specification says that it is to be backwards compatible with the CSS 2.1 specification that clearly states that the unit of measure is optional when the unit is 0. Bad mozilla, bad!

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.NET Optimization Framework Bug

KingMotley KingMotley writes  |  about 2 years ago

Apparently, the optimization framework (Also known as Bundling & Minification) has a nasty bug in it when doing bundling of javascript. When given a set of files, it first does a simple concatenation of the files together before doing a minification on the result. At first glance that seems to be a fairly obvious thing to do, well, except that if you have a whole line comment as your last line in a javascript file that doesn't end with a CR/LF that is. Unfortunately, that is exactly what some of the more popular minification tools currently do. It'll concatenate the first line of the next javascript file onto the comment line of the last file, and well, things go badly from there.

Supposedly there is a fix coming, but not in time for our latest release. Yay for having to delete all our pre-min'ed files, and recreating them without the debug comment that is typically there to help debug in chrome. Oh well, at least there is a workaround.

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Bad Chrome/Webkit

KingMotley KingMotley writes  |  about 2 years ago

Apparently Chrome has a bug when dealing with padding on elements with display:table. They've had one for a while, and it APPEARS they hacked it to always assume subtract the padding from the element's width, which is fine except for when you are in box-sizing:border, they still subtract it. Fail. Chrome breaking standards based layouts. Yes, it's been reported, "fixed" but broken in new and interesting ways -- for over a year.

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Firefox most braindead fieldset implementation

KingMotley KingMotley writes  |  about 2 years ago

As part of doing due diligence in creating websites that are accessible to the handicap, being able to use semantic markup is paramount. For forms, this means grouping logical sets of form elements, and wrapping them in a fieldset tag. As part of one of my most recent web designs, we used the fieldset to encapsulate groups of common tags that were collapsible. Well, that was until we found out that we had to bastardize our markup because firefox's implementation of the fieldset tag doesn't allow you to have content that is larger than the visible area that is. Yup, firefoxes implementation acts like it has overflow:visible stuck on, no matter what overflow setting you give it. Boo firefox for forcing us to wrap our pretty fieldsets in divs just because of your broken implementation.

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