Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

My resting heart rate:

Kittenman Re:A bell curve! (168 comments)

Hey, look: a bell curve!

Well, except for the bump at "100 bpm or greater". I didn't realize so many squirrels read slashdot.

Squirrel!

(Ok, it's an old meme...)

yesterday
top

Nvidia Sinks Moon Landing Hoax Using Virtual Light

Kittenman I know one... (258 comments)

My brother-in-law is a Apollo hoax believer. He challenged me once to debate the arguments for and against. I replied (quoted someone) 'You can't have a rational argument with an irrational person".

By the way, he's also into water divining... but that doesn't always work, for some reason. Now, there's a thing...


(Americans - the moon landings were among your finest achievements. In my opinion, history and the human race in general owes you a debt).

yesterday
top

Ancient Campfires Led To the Rise of Storytelling

Kittenman Re:The campfire gave rise to two things (80 comments)

whats a good way to try to make an intellectual snub at someone without adding to the conversation? I know, check spelling and grammar.

Missing apostrophe in "whats" - should be "what's".

Just getting into the swing of it.

yesterday
top

Developing the First Law of Robotics

Kittenman Re:Buridan's Principle (165 comments)

Interesting: I knew this story as "Bollum's Ass". I did a quick google on that, and you'd be amazed at what I got back.

Well, maybe not.

about a week ago
top

I think next winter will be:

Kittenman nine months away... (147 comments)

or so. I'm in the southern hemisphere, you inconsiderate clod!

about a week ago
top

Publishers Gave Away 123 Million Books During World War Two

Kittenman Re:Heard on NPR (121 comments)

When Fitzgerald died in 1940 in Hollywood, his last royalty check was for $13.13. Remaindered copies of the second printing of The Great Gatsby were moldering away in [publisher] Scribner's warehouse.

World War II starts, and a group of publishers, paper manufacturers, editors [and] librarians get together in New York. And they decide that men serving in the Army and Navy need something to read. ... They printed over 1,000 titles of different books, and they sent over a million copies of these books to sailors and soldiers serving overseas and also to [prisoners of war] in prison camps in Japan and Germany through an arrangement with the Red Cross.

The greatest distribution of the Armed Services Editions was on the eve of D-Day. Eisenhower's staff made sure that every guy stepping onto a landing craft in the south of England right on the eve of D-Day would have an Armed Services Edition in his pocket. They were sized as long rectangles meant to fit in the servicemen's pockets. (Her assertion was it was this service which reintroduced American's to Gatsby)

--Maureen Corrigan talking about her book, So We Read On: How the Great Gatsby Came to Be and Why It Endures

I remember once that someone carried a bullet from d-day around with him, and kept it in his pocket for luck. Once he tripped, landed on his back in the street. At the same time, someone in the building dropped a book from a window accidentally. The book was a hardback, fell - but bounced harmlessly off the bullet in the guy's pocket.

The guy always said that if it hadn't been for that bullet, the book would have killed him.

about two weeks ago
top

Publishers Gave Away 123 Million Books During World War Two

Kittenman Re:Winterhilfswerk (121 comments)

The Germans also had the Winter Charity (Winterhilfswerk), which printed millions of books for German soldiers, both propaganda and stories, humor, songbooks, etc.

I wouldn't be too surprised if the Brits and the Russians did something similar.

Brits did. My dad was in WW2, I remember seeing some Army issue paperbacks in the family bookshelves back in Surrey.

Brits also did free concerts (anyone else read 'The Cruel Sea'?) and suchlike. ENSA was the organization (can't remember what the acronym was for). I guess the UK equivalent of whatever organization sent Bob Hope around the world, entertaining the troops for the US.

about two weeks ago
top

UK's National Health Service Moves To NoSQL Running On an Open-Source Stack

Kittenman Impressive (198 comments)

..., they actually rolled out something., Didn't a huge replacement project runs for years and years, soak up bazillions and then get cancelled? But maybe that's the 'clinical' side of things. Yes, here it us .. http://www.theguardian.com/soc...

about two weeks ago
top

Unpopular Programming Languages That Are Still Lucrative

Kittenman ALGOL (386 comments)

Paid my rent for many a year. I dabble in it less now (some work in Powershell to do) but still my first love.

about two weeks ago
top

3 Short Walking Breaks Can Reverse Harm From 3 Hours of Sitting

Kittenman WorkRave.org (171 comments)

Nuff said. I hope.

about two weeks ago
top

3 Recent Flights Make Unscheduled Landings, After Disputes Over Knee Room

Kittenman Re: Anthropometrics (819 comments)

Vote how? Do you really think if I didn't HAVE TO fly because it is an unfortunate necessity for my job I would even go NEAR an airport? Do you think I consider it a great pastime to be the star in my personal pervert peep show for some TNA mouthbreather? Or that the butt-groping of that greasy single-digit IQ expert turns me on? Getting your kneecaps shoved into your thighs is just the icing on the turd cake.

Yes, that would be a knee-jerk reaction... if there was enough room for a knee to jerk, dammit!

Nicely put.

about two weeks ago
top

Steve Ballmer Authored the Windows 3.1 Ctrl-Alt-Del Screen

Kittenman Re:I miss the BSOD (169 comments)

I'd rather get some cryptic information about stop codes or an error message than a condescending sad face accompanied by a reboot request. At least I can look up the code and get a ballpark idea what the issue is without firing up windbg.

I like 'An unexpected error occurred..."

We need more expected errors. These unexpected ones are clouding the issue...

about three weeks ago
top

Could Tech Have Stopped ISIS From Using Our Own Heavy Weapons Against Us?

Kittenman Re:QUESTION? (448 comments)

Let's skip the occupation of the US capital, and burning of Washington's public buildings, then... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B...

That certainly happened during the war, rather than after.

about three weeks ago
top

In Maryland, a Soviet-Style Punishment For a Novelist

Kittenman Re:Sue the bastards (441 comments)

America.... home of the fr... yeah right.

Anyway, take a look at the kind of books that are *taught* in schools:

...

So lets see... underage sex, murder of your relatives, regicide, racism, lynchings, rape, adultery, organised crime, a mentally-ill killer and of course - lawless schoolboys killing each other! What's not to love about the American school system, yeehaw!

Tut now... I suspect your tongue is firmly in your cheek here, but just in case... I'd suggest that these books/plays are excellent examples of how some people solved difficult problems, and the consequences of doing so. Example - when someone's father dies, and the mother remarries, the protagonist can compare themselves to Hamlet., But that's just one example of how to handle that situation, and look how that ended up. And there are differences to the prince of Denmark, and Joe Soap in his mother's basement.

I expect people are usually around average intelligence... they'd enjoy those books.

PS I didn't realize 'Huck Finn' was still taught - that's excellent news. My compliments to your Educational system (this time),

about three weeks ago
top

Software Error Caused Soyuz/Galileo Failure

Kittenman Re:Not A SW error! (157 comments)

More like a failure to double check settings or something.

- "Are you really sure you want to trash those two satellites?" <click> - "Did you get your boss's approval?" <click>

Or... the Russian version of Clippy,..

"Hi - it looks like you're trying to trash two satellites. Do you want a hand with that?"

<click>

about three weeks ago
top

Should police have cameras recording their work at all times?

Kittenman Re:Almost dropped on side of HWY by my local 5-0 (455 comments)

see me on Facebook. Local undersherriff initiated a traffic stop in a dark territory valley (no cellular reception) while I was in my disabled vehicle waiting for traffic to go by before exiting to determine why I was having difficulty re-starting the engine.

You may not know the full story.

Cop: McClusky here
Base: Go ahead, McClusky
Cop: I'm in the Dark territory valley where Susie McSturgess went missing last month, and there's a vehicle here, parked. One person inside, apparently just sitting there.
Base:Proceed with caution, McClusky. Remember, little Susie is still missing

about a month ago
top

Should police have cameras recording their work at all times?

Kittenman Re:"Accidentally" (455 comments)

Slashdot cracks me up
Red faced and angry about the coming Surveillance State
Damned happy to have every cop be a walking surveillance unit
Anybody else see the irony?

Anyone else think this was a four-line haiku at first reading?

about a month ago
top

Ask Slashdot: What Do You Wish You'd Known Starting Out As a Programmer?

Kittenman Re:Maybe he should consider learning a language (548 comments)

Like, perhaps, English. So that he could - after all these years as a professional who types out strings of characters that very specific meaning - understand that when he says "could have cared less about my career," he means "could NOT have cared less about my career." Maybe he's been working all these years in languages that don't incorporate the concept of "not" or " ! " in evaluating two values. Are there any? I couldn't care less. Grown-ups who communicate or code for a living should be able to handle that one correctly.

Mod parent up. Totally agree - everyone in the profession should learn to write a document explaining something first. Grammar, spelling, getting an idea across, simple language, pitch to the audience, clear expressions... if you can do it in English (or whatever your native language is) then you're ready to pick up a "Learn to write {programming language du jour} in 10 minutes of your money back".

And read. Read fiction, read essays, read the paper, read a magazine, read emails. Get better and expand your vocabulary.

about a month ago
top

NASA's Space Launch System Searches For a Mission

Kittenman Wrong way to do it... (53 comments)

Aren't you supposed to have the problem before you have the solution?

Nasa: Hey, we have this great launch system
Everyone: Cool! What are you going to do with it?
Nasa: .....

No slight to Nasa (who've done amazing things) or to the States (ditto), but shouldn't you set a goal, and then go towards it with the right tools? (something like ....First, I believe that this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to the earth.)

about a month ago
top

51% of Computer Users Share Passwords

Kittenman Re:Because password policy is BORKED. (117 comments)

This is an example of a good password at my company "m7Rx2NqU" -- that's an unrecognizable jumble of characters that only a computer could love, but never a human.

I'd prefer to use "correcthorsebatterystaple" (ala XKCD), but my company's password policies do not let me use a pass phrase, but a jumble of numbers, letters and uppercase.

Tut now. I have a couple of dozen passwords, and literally have no idea what they are. But I do know what the password to my Password storage file is. I don't think I've actually known what my bank websites password is for about 5 years. But I know I can use it and change it.

And BTW, my daughter's router password in "CorrectHorseBatteryStaple" in her student flat. I'd wager that's a common one these days, along with MonkeySlut.

about a month ago

Submissions

top

NZ government denies 'mass domestic spying'

Kittenman Kittenman writes  |  about a week ago

Kittenman (971447) writes "The BBC and several domestic NZ sources are covering the latest revelations raised by Kim Dotcom, who is funding a political party in NZ as it heads to a general election on the 20th. Dotcom flew in a US journalist, Glenn Greenwald, and arranged for satellite links to Edward Snowden and Julian Assange, in their respective hideouts, at a 'disclosure' presentation in Auckland.

The NZ Prime Minister (John Key) has denied all claims. No-one making the claims can actually come up with a plausible reason why the NZ government would want to spy on its citizens."

Link to Original Source
top

Northwest Passage Exploration ship found

Kittenman Kittenman writes  |  about two weeks ago

Kittenman (971447) writes "The BBC (and several other sources) are carrying the news that the Canadian government has found the sunken remains of one of Sir John Franklin's ships (either the Erebus, or the Terror), that went missing in the 1840s, causing sensation in Victorian London. Sir John and his entire crew were never seen alive again, The search for traces of the expedition went for over ten years in the 19th century, partly led by Sir John's widow. The discovery has been called the biggest archaeological event since the discovery of Tutankhamen's tomb."
Link to Original Source
top

Archie Andrews to die

Kittenman Kittenman writes  |  about 2 months ago

Kittenman (971447) writes "With the net already awash with comments about Thor's sex-change, another revelation: Archie Andrews is scheduled to die in the very near future. Rolling Stone (and other sources) cover the comic characters upcoming demise. What will Veronica and Betty do? Will this cause a resurgence in Archie (and Jughead's) single, "Sugar Sugar"? Stay tuned."
Link to Original Source
top

Wireless Contraception

Kittenman Kittenman writes  |  about 2 months ago

Kittenman (971447) writes "The BBC is carrying information on a type of contraception (funded in part by Bill Gates) that takes the form of a microchip, inserted under the skin. The chip releases contraceptive hormones to the body until wirelessly advised not to do so, This 'Brave New World' has several interesting applications and issues associated with it. What about hackers? Could 'they' implant a chip into a child at birth and then suppress children being born, until the employment opportunities improve — or a war needs more troops? The chip will be available from 2018. This correspondent will watch the issues with interest."
Link to Original Source
top

A new 'dirty snowball' found: VP113

Kittenman Kittenman writes  |  about 6 months ago

Kittenman (971447) writes "Phil Plaitt in Slate is covering discovery of a new solar system object, known as VP113 (for now). The object is in a highly-elliptical orbit, currently at about 80 AU ... and that's its nearest point to the sun (perihelion). The furthest point is some 6 times that — putting it well into the Oort cloud."
Link to Original Source
top

NSA Spies in World of Warcraft

Kittenman Kittenman writes  |  about 9 months ago

Kittenman (971447) writes "The BBC is reporting that the US and UK spy agencies 'patrol' online games (such as 'World of Warcraft' and 'Second Life') to keep an eye on terrorist communications. The NSA "allegedly warned that such online games could allow intelligence targets to hide in plain sight". The same group have extracted WoW account data, attempting to link it to Islamic extremism.

Certainly a potential for data mining here — but keep an eye on that next elf you meet... it could really be a spook."

Link to Original Source
top

Man stays legally dead, despite pulse

Kittenman Kittenman writes  |  about a year ago

Kittenman (971447) writes "Donald Miller Jr of Ohio was declared legally dead in 1994, eight years after disappearing. He resurfaced in 2005, needing to regain his Social security number. His wife battled the case to declare him alive, as she was unable to repay the social security benefits she had received. The judge declared the man still dead, as there is only a three-year period to reverse the original ruling.

“I don’t know where that leaves you, but you’re still deceased as far as the law is concerned,” the judge said."

Link to Original Source
top

Fox sued by Suicide's widow

Kittenman Kittenman writes  |  about a year ago

Kittenman (971447) writes "Fox news covered a police chase on JoDon Romero, live from a chopper, following his (alleged) theft of a car at gunpoint. Unwittingly (we hope) they also covered his suicide — broadcast live to his wife and three children, along with all other viewers.

The widow is suing fox for unspecified damages, claiming 'emotional distress'. Pity that off switch was too far away."

Link to Original Source
top

Apple under scrutiny for massive tax avoidance

Kittenman Kittenman writes  |  about a year ago

Kittenman (971447) writes "Tweaktown are carrying news reported elsewhere; that Apple are under scrutiny for escaping some US$44billion (that's a billion, as per Carl Sagan) of taxes, between 2009 and 2012. CEO Tim Cook appeared/will appear before a Senate investigation on Tuesday.

Apple's testimony states that Apple 'pays all it's required taxes, both in this country and abroad' and that they do no use 'tax gimmicks'.

The case continues..."

Link to Original Source
top

Alexander Graham Bell speaks!

Kittenman Kittenman writes  |  about a year ago

Kittenman (971447) writes "A Smithsonian recording of the voice of Alexander Graham Bell, inventor of the telephone had been deemed too fragile to play or try to listen to, for 138 years. Modern technology has caught up, however, and scientists made ultra-high definition images of the disks, allowing the depth and contours of the wiggles and grooves to be accurately measured — and bring the voice back to life, without ever touching the recording physically."
Link to Original Source
top

Your plastic pal who's fun to be with - or not

Kittenman Kittenman writes  |  about a year and a half ago

Kittenman (971447) writes "The BBC magazine pages have an article on human trust of robots. The article cites a poll (done on facebook so certainly well-sourced) over the 'best face' design for a robot that would be trusted. But we still distrust them — because (tfa states) they look unwell (or like corpses) and do not behave as expected.

So would you trust a robot? How about one with the "trusting face"?"

Link to Original Source
top

Osama Bin Laden: the Funpark

Kittenman Kittenman writes  |  about a year and a half ago

Kittenman (971447) writes "The BBC is reporting that Abbottabad — the place where OBL was found and killed by US Special forces — is to build an amusement park. The new park will not be near the site (now demolished) but will feature mini-golf, water sports and rock cllimbing. Possibly to help time pass for future terrorists otherwise at a loss of how to fill their days?"
Link to Original Source
top

Original Batmobile sells for US$4.2m

Kittenman Kittenman writes  |  about a year and a half ago

Kittenman (971447) writes "Rick Champagne, a 56 year old company owner from Arizona has bought the original "Batmobile" (dating back to Burt Ward and the '60s) for US$4.2 million. He's quoted as saying it "was a dream come true".

Holy Investment, Batman!"

Link to Original Source
top

Texas state RFID story: student loses appeal

Kittenman Kittenman writes  |  about a year and a half ago

Kittenman (971447) writes "Andrea Hernandez has lost her appeal to avoid wearing the RFID tag, covered elsewhere on Slashdot. Interestingly, Hernandez cited religious reasons for refusing to wear the device, referring to the item as 'the mark of the beast'. A clever appeal to religious freedom rather than civil liberties, perhaps?"
Link to Original Source
top

Do flu vaccines give you flu?

Kittenman Kittenman writes  |  about 2 years ago

Kittenman (971447) writes "The BBC is covering the ins and outs of Flu vaccines. According to the article, the vaccine is approximately 60% effectice, and it is the World Health Organization (WHO) that decide what strains (to a maximum of 3) are prevalent each year, and recommend that to go into the vaccine. And surprisingly, (or not), the recommendations for each hemisphere of the globe can be different. So are you more likely to get the flu if you fly from London to Sydney after a jab?"
Link to Original Source
top

BBC turn off CEEFAX service

Kittenman Kittenman writes  |  about a year ago

Kittenman (971447) writes "After 38 years (1974-> 2012) the BBC's CEEFAX service has ceased transmission. The service gave on-line up-to-date textual information (albeit in condensed form) to TV viewers in the pre-Internet era and afterwards. An British ex-PM (John Major) states ..
"From breaking global news to domestic sports news, Ceefax was speedy, accurate and indispensable. It can be proud of its record.""

Link to Original Source
top

Democrat candidate is an Orc

Kittenman Kittenman writes  |  about 2 years ago

Kittenman (971447) writes "Maine Republicans have discovered that the Democrat candidate, Colleen Lachowicz, plays an Orc rogue in World of Warcraft. They point out to readers of their website that her liking for back-stabbing and poison may make her 'unfit for office'."
Link to Original Source
top

IRIDOLOGIST A MAJOR FACTOR IN DEATH

Kittenman Kittenman writes  |  about 2 years ago

Kittenman (971447) writes "NZ's Auckland daily is covering (partly as a TV promotion) the story of a Naturopath (in this case, an iridologist) who was consulted by a woman with a 'cyst' on her skull. After 18 months of 'treatments', the woman died of the 'cyst', which was actually a cancer. The woman left behind a letter stating that the naturopath advised against consulting a doctor — and the naturopath in turn states that she did request the woman to see a doctor.

What's amazing is that the naturopath cannot be 'struck off', as she is exempt from such treatment by being in the 'alternative medicine' field."

Link to Original Source
top

Apollo mission flags still upright

Kittenman Kittenman writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Kittenman (971447) writes "The BBC reports that the Apollo mission flags are still standing — with one exception. At Apollo 11 blast-off from the luna surface, the flag was knocked over (Buzz Aldrin reported this at the time). It's not known what sort of colours are visible in the flags owing to UV light exposure.

All in all, hopefully a blow to Moon Mission deniers?"

Link to Original Source

Journals

Kittenman has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>