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Comments

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Google Changes 'To Fight Piracy' By Highlighting Legal Sites

KozmoStevnNaut Re:Gasp (126 comments)

Cats and dogs living together!

2 hours ago
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The Largest Ship In the World Is Being Built In Korea

KozmoStevnNaut Re:Ho-lee-crap (240 comments)

Because A.P Møller-Mærsk used to a point of pride for Denmark. One of our biggest companies and a big international player with influence all over the world, and they supported little ol' Denmark by making use of local labor and expertise, sponsoring public projects and *gasp* paying their taxes. It was a fully-sustainable business approach, and supported hundreds of other Danish companies, not to mention thousands of Danish shipbuilders, often lauded as the very best in the world.

South Korea is definitely not a third-world country, and I am not denigrating the great skills of their shipbuilders at all, it's a tough job for tough people. But it's still outsourcing tasks to the other side of the world, when they could very easily have been solved at home in way that would have been beneficial to both A.P. Møller-Mærsk and Denmark as a whole.

9 hours ago
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The Largest Ship In the World Is Being Built In Korea

KozmoStevnNaut Re:Ho-lee-crap (240 comments)

It's bullshit that they're building them in Korea, though.

We have perfectly capable, world-class shipyards in Denmark, practically begging to take on these kinds of tasks. In the old days, when Arnold Mærsk Mc-Kinney Møller still ran the company, these orders would have gone to Danish companies. No more, now everything is outsourced to the lowest bidder.

10 hours ago
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JavaScript and the Netflix User Interface

KozmoStevnNaut Re:To those who mock Web applications (186 comments)

Did you choose the "sketchy" type in the pencil settings, by any chance? Try using the "plain" type instead :-)

yesterday
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JavaScript and the Netflix User Interface

KozmoStevnNaut Re:Browser Apps are NOT desktop apps (186 comments)

Because of convenience. Updates and new features are added automatically, and the developers only have to deploy a single copy to know that everyone has the latest features and bugfixes, instead of having to rely on people updating their local copies. And as long as you have access to a computer with an Internet connection, you have access to the apps you're used to.

Of course there are downsides, but local software has downsides too. It all comes down to your user profile, and for most people, Google docs has all the features they need. For power users, you have locally-installed applications with larger feature sets and harder learning curves.

yesterday
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After Negative User Response, ChromeOS To Re-Introduce Support For Ext{2,3,4}

KozmoStevnNaut Re:Language restriction (183 comments)

Right, it's definitely not a perfect solution. But then again, Chromebooks aren't really targeted at your type of use case. MS seems to want to resurrect the netbook, with a full Win8/10 installation to compete with Chromebooks. That's probably your best bet for cheap on-the-go development.

yesterday
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After Negative User Response, ChromeOS To Re-Introduce Support For Ext{2,3,4}

KozmoStevnNaut Re:So now I've contributed to OSS! (183 comments)

True, it's probably niche in the basic number of users. But the people who actually use extFS on their Chromebooks tend to be power users and developers, a lot of the time they are the very people who develop Chrome apps and extensions. That's a niche you do not want to neglect, and I think the Chrome developers realized that.

2 days ago
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After Negative User Response, ChromeOS To Re-Introduce Support For Ext{2,3,4}

KozmoStevnNaut Re:Language restriction (183 comments)

Well, there are a handful of sites like http://cpp.sh/ where you can test your code. I haven't used them myself, but I've had them recommended to me.

2 days ago
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After Negative User Response, ChromeOS To Re-Introduce Support For Ext{2,3,4}

KozmoStevnNaut Re:Recurring fee; antitrust (183 comments)

Provided the applications you want to use are ported to Chrome OS as packaged apps. I don't think all apps that I use regularly are ported, but then I'm in a minority because I do software development on my laptop. Would I need to rewrite my apps in JavaScript to develop the overall logic on a Chromebook and then port them back to the target platform on a desktop computer? I was under the impression that developing in anything but JavaScript required SSH.

That's true, but the list of offline-capable Chrome apps is quite long: https://chrome.google.com/webs...

Strictly speaking, you could develop anything in a basic text editor, but I assume you actually want a semi-decent IDE? I don't know of any that aren't javascript-focused on ChromeOS, no.

Sorry, I'm in Denmark, and I know mobile subscriptions vary wildly on either side of the Atlantic. The price you quote is pretty bad, and I assume it limits tethering as well?

I thought the APIs used by most iOS apps were hardcoded to point at iCloud instead of Google Drive, Dropbox, or OneDrive (formerly SkyDrive). But then I've never bought an iOS device. Likewise, does Chrome OS allow switching any arbitrary app to use Dropbox or OneDrive instead of Google Drive? Or should people be choosing apps on the basis of which storage provider they support?

I own an iPad, although not by choice. I've had no issues using Google Drive for all my personal stuff, but it's true that device backups etc. are locked to iCloud.

I don't know about ChromeOS, as I don't have a Chromebook yet. I assume the Google apps use Google Drive, and MS apps use OneDrive, but I don't know about other third-party apps.

2 days ago
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After Negative User Response, ChromeOS To Re-Introduce Support For Ext{2,3,4}

KozmoStevnNaut Re:Is the USA in the cellular first world? (183 comments)

Mobile data plans are cheap as chips in most first-world countries

By "most first-world countries", do you include the United States or somewhere else where most able-bodied people born in the United States can easily qualify for a work visa? If so, to which countries are you referring?

Basically all of Western Europe. For instance, here in Denmark my plan is 3GB/month for ~$17, which also includes 5 hours talk time and unlimited SMS and MMS (and we don't pay to receive calls or messages). And there are no limits on tethering. For reference, I work at an ISP/Telco and my subscription is from our basic self-service brand. We've just measured the average data rate of our 4G network to be over 50Mbit/s basically everywhere there's coverage, and peaking at over 100Mbit/s in some areas.

plus odds are you'll have wifi access available in a lot more places than you'd think.

My laptop sees the beacons, but the bus has pulled off before it can finish associating, let alone transferring packets to and from the Internet. And I've found plenty of stores whose public Wi-Fi is limited to 30 minutes, after which the AP's captive portal enforces an hours-long cooldown period before the same MAC can regain an Internet connection. This hurts when I'm waiting for the roommate to finish shopping, eating, or whatever, or if the roommate has run into an old friend from her previous job.

I may be spoiled rotten by our infrastructure, but we actually have APs on the busses and trains, free of charge.

As for the store-provided hotspots blocking access, that's easily circumvented by spoofing your MAC. Not that I would ever engage in such shenanigans ;-)

But really, your use case falls outside of what a Chromebook is meant for.

Which is ultimately my point. Too many laptop makers disappoint me by selling only Chromebooks in the form factor I want, not something that better fits my use case.

There are a handful of Chromebook-targeted Win8.1 laptops out there, and more cheaper versions are on the way: http://www.theverge.com/2014/8...

Personally, I think maybe people are going to be slightly disappointed at their performance, but for $200, you can't really complain, right? A lean Linux distro should perk up the performance nicely.

2 days ago
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JavaScript and the Netflix User Interface

KozmoStevnNaut Re:What browser apps need.. (186 comments)

It's the default action for the backspace key for basically every browser ever on Windows, as well as in Explorer windows. I used it that way for a long time, but since switching to Linux where using backspace to go back in history isn't the default, I was annoyed for a little while and then just stopped using it. I have no idea why it's the default on Windows, though.

I did lose a lot of forums posts back in the Windows days due to backspacing while not having the text box focused.

2 days ago
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After Negative User Response, ChromeOS To Re-Introduce Support For Ext{2,3,4}

KozmoStevnNaut Re:Offline reading (183 comments)

That's a good example, and that's exactly how Chrome does it. Firefox requires you to manually reload the tabs first.

2 days ago
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After Negative User Response, ChromeOS To Re-Introduce Support For Ext{2,3,4}

KozmoStevnNaut Re:Cellular data charges; SaaSS data mining (183 comments)

Mobile data plans are cheap as chips in most first-world countries, plus odds are you'll have wifi access available in a lot more places than you'd think.

But really, your use case falls outside of what a Chromebook is meant for. It's meant for browsing, email, videos, chatting and that sort of thing. You can develop software on in, but it's not ideal, as it was meant for other purposes.

2 days ago
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After Negative User Response, ChromeOS To Re-Introduce Support For Ext{2,3,4}

KozmoStevnNaut Re:Recurring fee; antitrust (183 comments)

it's only in the last couple of years that we have actually gotten there, through wider 3G/4G coverage

Which carries a substantial recurring fee. I already pay for Internet at home. Why should I have to pay again to be able to use my own computer while riding the city bus?

If course, you're not paying to use your own computer, you're paying for Internet access while you're on the go. You can use a Chromebook while offline now, you know.

I may be a bit privileged in this area, as we have free wifi on the busses and trains around here. And my mobile subscription is $17/month, which includes 3GB data. That's actually quite a lot of data, even with heavy use of my phone for tethering and watching Youtube etc., the highest I've ever used in a month is 1.5GB.

Why do you think centralizing computing power is such a bad thing?

Because as implemented, it restricts me from choosing with whom to centralize computing power.

No, it's actually pretty easy to choose where to centralize computing power. Just off the top of my head, you can choose between Google (ChromeOS, Google Drive, Google Docs etc.), Microsoft (Skydrive, Office365, Outlook.com etc.) and Apple (iCloud, iTunes etc.).

Can you install an alternative browser on ChromeOS? No, because the browser is actually the shell. But you can easily use competing web-based services, no problem. So it's pretty much the same situation as with iOS, where you can only install different UIs for the default Safari browser, but nothing's stopping you from installing Google Drive or Dropbox etc. and using them instead of iCloud storage.

And why would Google want to offer alternative data vendors on their platform?

Because a country's competition regulator may decide that Google has market power over operating systems that ship on laptop computers with 10" displays and thus require them to do so.

They already offer access to alternative data vendors, nothing's preventing you from using Outlook.com instead of Gmail and Skydrive instead of Google Drive.

As long as Apple aren't forced to open up the iPhone/iPad platforms, I don't think Google will be forced to open up the ChromeOS platform.

2 days ago
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After Negative User Response, ChromeOS To Re-Introduce Support For Ext{2,3,4}

KozmoStevnNaut Re:Offline use (183 comments)

And there's nothing preventing you from doing that on a Chromebook. After all, there's a basic text editor ;-)

But just off the top of my head, there's also Spark, Text, Tailor, ShiftEdit and Caret, all of which have syntax highlighting etc., and work offline.

2 days ago
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After Negative User Response, ChromeOS To Re-Introduce Support For Ext{2,3,4}

KozmoStevnNaut Re:All I know is... (183 comments)

When basically all of the other developers go "WTF, why was this even suggested?" at something, maybe it's time to rethink whether you're in the right place. How can someone be so damn pigheaded about a stupid-ass decision?

3 days ago
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After Negative User Response, ChromeOS To Re-Introduce Support For Ext{2,3,4}

KozmoStevnNaut Re:Ditch ChromeOS, focus on Android (183 comments)

I think the Lenovo Yoga Chromebook with the screen that folds 360 degrees around to make a superfat tablet is probably the only reasonable touch Chromebook right now. Load up web pages in fullscreen portrait mode and you can browse away kinda like on a tablet. That's probably the only use I can think of, though.

4 days ago
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Apple Announces iPad Air 2, iPad mini 3, OS X Yosemite and More

KozmoStevnNaut Re:DOS (350 comments)

I have this problem already on a 2560x1440 27" monitor, I can't imagine having them reduced to a quarter of the size they are now :-O

Yeah yeah, I know everyone's going to run then pixel-doubled for sharper cleaner graphics and text, but it would be hilarious to run it at 1:1 for a while.

4 days ago

Submissions

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MIT flow battery tech could benefit electric cars

KozmoStevnNaut KozmoStevnNaut writes  |  more than 3 years ago

KozmoStevnNaut writes "Researchers at MIT have developed an improved version of flow battery technology, which they claim could provide at large boost in usability for electric vehicles.

From the article: "Solid particles are suspended in a carrier liquid and pumped through the system. In this design, the battery's active components — the positive and negative electrodes, or cathodes and anodes — are composed of particles suspended in a liquid electrolyte."

The researchers claim this could enable recharging times for electric cars on par with refueling times for conventional ICE vehicles. They envision replacing a vehicle's spent battery liquid with freshly charged liquid using conventional pumping technology. The spent liquid can then be recharged and reused."

Link to Original Source

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