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Sexist Presentations At Startup Competition Prompt TechCrunch Apology

Lasrick Re:Should have done it on MTV (762 comments)

Jesus. Why do you change the subject? Did I or anyone say it's okay to present graphic violence as entertainment? You are deflecting from discussion about what these two grown men did at a professional conference, which many people attended for the technical information. When you buy a ticket to a movie or a performance, you have a general idea of what you are going to get. If you want to see gratuitous sex and/or violence, you may choose to do so. And others may choose not to. When at a professional conference, the intent is altogether different. People are there for a variety of reasons, and having these men push their sexist, misogynist agenda on them is wrong.

about 7 months ago
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On the end of USPS 1st Class Saturday delivery:

Lasrick Re:Congress hates us (564 comments)

ThinkProgress is hardly a "kook blog". Their article states that "Under the Postal Accountability and Enhancement Act, Congress has for years forced the USPS to pre-fund 75 years’ worth of pensions for its employees, a requirement not made of any other public or private institution. That means that the Postal Service is footing the bill for employees it hasn’t even hired yet." http://thinkprogress.org/tag/us-postal-service/

about a year ago
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Secret UK uranium components plant closed over safety fears

Lasrick Not uranium enriching (2 comments)

Title here is misleading, sorry. It's not a uranium enriching plant, but rather "A top-secret plant at Aldermaston that makes enriched uranium components for Britain's nuclear warheads and fuel for the Royal Navy's submarines has been shut down because corrosion has been discovered in its "structural steelwork", the Guardian can reveal." There is some debate going on over the article over Pugwash and other lists that deal in non-proliferation issues.

about a year ago

Submissions

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Did Israel steal bomb-grade uranium from the United States?

Lasrick Lasrick writes  |  2 days ago

Lasrick (2629253) writes "Victor Gilinsky and Roger J. Mattson update their story on the NUMEC affair to take into account the recent release of hundreds of classified documents that shed additional light on the story. In the 1960s, the Nuclear Materials and Equipment Corporation (NUMEC) was found to be missing about a 100 pounds of bomb-grade uranium. Based on available evidence, Gilinsky and Mattson are convinced that the material ended up in Israel nuclear bombs. The newly release documents add more to the story, and Gilinsky and Mattson are calling on President Obama to declassify the remainder of the file."
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The lack of US cybersecurity across the electric grid

Lasrick Lasrick writes  |  5 days ago

Lasrick (2629253) writes "Meghan McGuinness of the Bipartisan Policy Center writes about the Electric Grid Cybersecurity Initiative, a collaborative effort between the center’s Energy and Homeland Security Projects. She points out that over half the attacks on US critical infrastructure sectors last year were on the energy sector. Cyber attacks could come from a variety of sources, and 'a large-scale cyber attack or combined cyber and physical attack could lead to enormous costs, potentially triggering sustained power outages over large portions of the electric grid and prolonged disruptions in communications, food and water supplies, and health care delivery.' ECGI is recommending the creation of a new, industry-supported model that would create incentives for the continual improvement and adaptation needed to respond effectively to rapidly evolving cyber threats. The vulnerability of the grid has been much discussed this last week; McGuinness's recommendations are a good place to start."
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Climate scientist: Why nuclear power may be the only way to avoid geoengineering

Lasrick Lasrick writes  |  about a week ago

Lasrick (2629253) writes "Tom Wigley is one of the world's top climate scientists, and in this interview he explains his outspoken support for both nuclear energy and research into climate engineering. Wigley was one of the first scientists to break the taboo on public discussion of climate engineering as a possible response to global warming; in a 2006 paper in the journal Science, he proposed a combined geoengineering-mitigation strategy that would address the problem of increasing ocean acidity, as well as the problem of climate change. In this interview, he argues that hat renewable energy alone will not be sufficient to address the climate challenge, because it cannot be scaled up quickly and cheaply enough, and that opposition to nuclear power 'threatens humanity’s ability to avoid dangerous climate change.'"
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The US nuclear weapons complex in disarray, disrepair, and perhaps dissolution

Lasrick Lasrick writes  |  about two weeks ago

Lasrick (2629253) writes "Kennette Benedict on the severe problems that plague the US nuclear weapons labs (Sandia, Los Alamos, Lawrence Livermore, Oak Ridge, etc.). A main issue is the privatization of these labs. As NNSA director Bruce Held put it, 'I don’t think we need national laboratories to aspire to be the low-cost producer of widgets. I don’t think that’s why national laboratories exist...What we need national laboratories for is to take on really hard technical challenges that are facing our nation and our national policymakers—take on high-risk, hard problems that involve too much risk for the private sector to honestly support.' Good read."
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Fukushima, USA

Lasrick Lasrick writes  |  about two weeks ago

Lasrick (2629253) writes "Edwin Lyman of the Union of Concerned Scientists elaborates on the recent finding that dozens of nuclear power plants in the US are at significant risk of experiencing natural disasters exceeding their 'design basis,' and the uncertainty that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission is willing to do anything about it. Seventy-five percent of the plants submitting recent reevaluations have found the earthquake hazard is greater than the one they were designed to handle, and reactor owners are lagging in their reevaluations of flooding risks, with 11 of 25 missing the March 12, 2014 deadline. Industry representatives argue that the NRC is forcing them to develop mitigation strategies for floods that could never occur. 'To his credit, NRC official Michael Johnson pushed back: “I get a little nervous when I hear people talk about an external event that could not happen."' The similarities to the reported attitude of Japan's TEPCO prior to the Fukushima accident are difficult to ignore."
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Remembering the women in America's nuclear weapons history

Lasrick Lasrick writes  |  about two weeks ago

Lasrick (2629253) writes "Wonderful essay that asks us to remember and honor the women in America's 'rich nuclear history,' from the women in the 1940's who worked at the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (and who were kept in the dark about the nature of their work), to the women in recent years who have been involved in nuclear weapons policy. The author draws on information from the essay "Sex and Death in the Rational World of Defense Intellectuals" and "The Girls of Atomic City" to describe 'the barrier(s) to entry unique to the brave new world of nuclear politics.' Great read."
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The Military Must Hunt Corruption, Not Just Terrorists

Lasrick Lasrick writes  |  about two weeks ago

Lasrick (2629253) writes "Sarah Chayes is senior associate in the Democracy and Rule of Law and South Asia Programs at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and has been adviser to top US military brass including Mike Mullen and David McKiernan. Here she examines how corrupt states are fueling global instability: 'As popular uprisings keep toppling governments like bowling pins, the latest round has morphed into a great power face-off — with Russia and the West glowering at each other across a divided Ukraine. Thailand, a key United States military friend in Southeast Asia, could be next on the list. Thousands of protests rock Chinese provinces each month, worrying President Xi Jinping’s still-green administration. The Egyptian and Syrian revolutions have spun off into bloody and widening strife, while extremist insurgencies in Afghanistan, Nigeria and the Philippines stubbornly challenge state stability. What links these far-flung events, most of them high on the U.S. list of security priorities? Corruption.'"
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It's a Fukushima Earth

Lasrick Lasrick writes  |  about two weeks ago

Lasrick (2629253) writes "Dawn Stover on the similarities between the foreseeable catastrophe at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station and the 'slow-motion planetary destruction of global warming.' As with nuclear power plants, there are 'mitigation strategies and infrastructure modifications to reduce risk; better instrumentation to provide reliable data about what’s happening; constant data reevaluation to understand potential effects and determine whether safety upgrades are needed; periodic re-analysis of the potential impacts of extreme events; examination of the regulatory framework to see whether it has sufficient protections and enforcement; and evaluation of strategies for containing damage when it does occur.' These were ignored at Fukushima; will they continued to be ignored on Fukushima earth?"
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Congress's Scientific Illiterates Are Resigning the World to Ruin

Lasrick Lasrick writes  |  about two weeks ago

Lasrick (2629253) writes "Brian Merchant at Motherboard examines the March 26th at the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology's 2015 budget request hearing...the one White House adviser Dr. John Holdren addressed to defend funding for science programs. Video clips prove the comments that are difficult to believe, when you read them. It's pretty appalling, and it isn't any better in the US Senate, as Merchant points out."
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Is Mankind Warming the Earth? Fantastic look at coverage from 1970s

Lasrick Lasrick writes  |  about two weeks ago

Lasrick (2629253) writes "Dan Drollette looked in the archives of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists and found some pretty amazing coverage of "climate change" (including an early use of that term) from the 1970s. Drollette focuses on a 1978 article by meteorologist William Kellogg, of the National Center for Atmospheric Research. There's a link to Kellogg's article, which includes some pretty fantastic diagrams, including a list of "Mankind's Leverage Points on Climate," which includes not only leverage points (such as "land use") but also a prediction about the scale and importance of each point on the climate. Really fascinating stuff."
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Threatened pandemics and laboratory escapes: Self-fulfilling prophecies

Lasrick Lasrick writes  |  about three weeks ago

Lasrick (2629253) writes "Martin Furmanski, a medical doctor and medical historian, writes of the laboratory escapes of high-consequence pathogens that have occurred in recent decades (including several instances of smallpox!). The article explores "gain of function" experiments-- experiments in which researchers manipulate dangerous pathogens to increase communicability among humans, and whether the benefit we see from those experiments outweighs the incredible risk. 'Many other laboratory escapes of high-consequence pathogens have occurred, resulting in transmission beyond laboratory personnel. Ironically, these laboratories were working with pathogens to prevent the very outbreaks they ultimately caused. For that reason, the tragic consequences have been called “self-fulfilling prophecies."' Interesting topic that doesn't get much attention in the main-stream press, unless it's part of a Hollywood movie."
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An Adaptation From 'Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt,' by Michael Lewis

Lasrick Lasrick writes  |  about three weeks ago

Lasrick (2629253) writes "This NYT adaptation from the book provides an in-depth and infuriating look at how the stock market is rigged. Brad Katsuyama of the Royal Bank of Canada couldn't understand why stock he was trying to buy would suddenly vanish: 'Before RBC acquired this supposed state-of-the-art electronic-trading firm, Katsuyama’s computers worked as he expected them to. Suddenly they didn’t. It used to be that when his trading screens showed 10,000 shares of Intel offered at $22 a share, it meant that he could buy 10,000 shares of Intel for $22 a share. He had only to push a button. By the spring of 2007, however, when he pushed the button to complete a trade, the offers would vanish.' The ensuing investigation by Katsuyama led him to design a program that actually slowed down the trades. But Katsuyama's investigation revealed so much about how the system is rigged. Great read."
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Ford Just Destroyed Cadillac's Ad Praising Rich Guys Who Work All The Time

Lasrick Lasrick writes  |  about three weeks ago

Lasrick (2629253) writes "This is great. Ford destroys that stupid Cadillac ad that shows a rich guy banging on about how hard it is to be a hard-working rich American guy, but how ultimately it's so much better than being a European who gets two weeks off every August. It's that attitude that because rich people work hard, they assume that non-rich people don't. And also that the only thing admirable is working hard so that you can get rich. Many people work hard but want their work to make the world a better place, not just so that they accumulate wealth. Ford made a great ad."
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How the Jaafari Personal Status Law Could Set Iraqi Women Back Decades

Lasrick Lasrick writes  |  about a month ago

Lasrick (2629253) writes "Isobel Coleman at Foreign Affairs examines proposed changes in Iraqi law that, if implemented, would be a tremendous setback for women; Sharia law would allow Shia leaders to exert religious control over critical family matters such as marriage, divorce, custody, and inheritance for the country’s Shia — some 60–65 percent of the population. These changes would 'drastically curtail their civil rights in the name of religion, and deepen sectarian tensions in society. It would also seriously undermine the rights of women and children by permitting unfettered polygamy, a Taliban-like restriction on women’s movement, child marriage for girls as young as nine, unequal divorce and custody, and an end to interreligious marriage.'"
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Fire and leakage at WIPP, & what it means for defense nuclear waste disposal

Lasrick Lasrick writes  |  about a month ago

Lasrick (2629253) writes "An underground fire and a separate plutonium leak at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) has left the US with no repository for transuranic (TRU) waste--that is, radioactive elements heavier than uranium on the periodic chart, such as plutonium, americium, curium and neptunium. WIPP is a bedded salt formation in New Mexico, chosen because of its presumed long-term stability and self-sealing properties, and it currently holds, among other things, 4.9 metric tons of plutonium. Despite assurances from the DOE that the plant would soon reopen, New Mexico has cancelled WIPP's disposal permit indefinitely. Robert Alvarez, who has served as senior policy adviser to the Energy Department's secretary and as deputy assistant secretary for national security, explores what happened at WIPP, and what it means for defense nuclear waste storage."
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Article on Ukraine's East/West divide show history in the making

Lasrick Lasrick writes  |  about a month ago

Lasrick (2629253) writes "Dan Drollette digs into the archives and finds eerie premonitions of the current crisis in the Bulletin's past coverage of Ukraine. The section that alludes to Czechoslovakia is particularly haunting."
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Fighting radiological terrorism with changes to medical procedures & technol

Lasrick Lasrick writes  |  about a month ago

Lasrick (2629253) writes ""This article lays out changes in medical technology that should be discussed at the upcoming Nuclear Security Summit (March 24-25). Although 'High-risk radiological sources like cobalt 60 and cesium 137 serve valuable purposes in industry and research, particularly in medicine...'these sources are usually located in publicly accessible spaces, like hospitals or universities...' The article details alternative technologies that could be used instead of technology that relies on radioactive sources. One such change could come in the area of blood irradiation: '...a gradual phase-out of cesium chloride use in pre-transfusion blood irradiation on a global scale—a domain in which non-isotopic alternatives are considered to be the most viable in the short-term.' I'm glad someone is thinking about these things.""
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Russia's "limited nuclear strike" doctrine may be at work in the Ukraine

Lasrick Lasrick writes  |  about a month ago

Lasrick (2629253) writes "The Russian doctrine of "limited nuclear strike" may be part of what is dictating restraint as the West tries to formulate a response to the Ukraine crisis.Vladimir Putin, then-secretary of Russia’s Security Council, began formulating this doctrine during the Kosovo conflict, when it became apparent that the conventional military power of the US grossly outstripped that of Russia's. 'Such a threat is envisioned as deterring the United States and its allies from involvement in conflicts in which Russia has an important stake, and in this sense is essentially defensive. Yet, to be effective, such a threat also must be credible. To that end, all large-scale military exercises that Russia conducted beginning in 2000 featured simulations of limited nuclear strikes.'"
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Onagawa: The Japanese nuclear power plant that didn't melt down on 3/11

Lasrick Lasrick writes  |  about a month ago

Lasrick (2629253) writes "This article really exposes TEPCO's sloppiness and, frankly, greed. Due to a completely different safety culture, the Onagawa nuclear power plant in Japan did not experience any of the problems that happened in Fukushima, and that is because the company that owns it, Tohoku Electric, had a completely different approach to safety: 'Most people believe that Fukushima Daiichi’s meltdowns were predominantly due to the earthquake and tsunami. The survival of Onagawa, however, suggests otherwise. Onagawa was only 123 kilometers away from the epicenter—60 kilometers closer than Fukushima Daiichi—and the difference in seismic intensity at the two plants was negligible. Furthermore, the tsunami was bigger at Onagawa, reaching a height of 14.3 meters, compared with 13.1 meters at Fukushima Daiichi. The difference in outcomes at the two plants reveals the root cause of Fukushima Daiichi’s failures: the utility’s corporate “safety culture.”'"
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Fukushima worker gives eyewitness account about what happened that day

Lasrick Lasrick writes  |  about a month and a half ago

Lasrick (2629253) writes "Tuesday, March 11 is the 3rd anniversary of the Fukushima disaster. In this article, a worker at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station gives his eyewitness account of what happened there on March 11, 2011, in the immediate wake of a massive earthquake and tsunami that caused three of the station’s reactor cores to melt."
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