×

Announcing: Slashdot Deals - Explore geek apps, games, gadgets and more. (what is this?)

Thank you!

We are sorry to see you leave - Beta is different and we value the time you took to try it out. Before you decide to go, please take a look at some value-adds for Beta and learn more about it. Thank you for reading Slashdot, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Thinking and Reasoning Computers in Five Years?

LeadSongDog then... (1 comments)

we'll see how long it takes the computers to produce thinking and reasoning humans.

about a week ago
top

How High-Tech Temporary Tattoos Will Hack Your Skin

LeadSongDog Re:Please tell me (57 comments)

Ok, this is /. so of course you didn't read tfa, but it does say it works on lactate, or CH3CH(OH)COO, but it isn't explicit about what it does with it. Have fun with the list of patents: http://www.mc10inc.com/patents...

about two weeks ago
top

Mathematical Trick Helps Smash Record For the Largest Quantum Factorization

LeadSongDog Re:Errr...ummm...IQC (Institute for Quantum Comput (62 comments)

IQC ('Quantum Valley'), at the University of Waterloo, and the Perimenter Institute in Waterloo, Canada, have 12 qubit computers... phys.org/pdf66322040.pdf

...or at least 12 is the peak of the p.d.f.

about two weeks ago
top

Is a "Wikipedia For News" Feasible?

LeadSongDog Re:I don't get it (167 comments)

be gentle, Slashdot! We are still in early stages!

Simple - HMBNH.

tldr

about two weeks ago
top

Security Experts Believe the Internet of Things Will Be Used To Kill Someone

LeadSongDog News Flash (165 comments)

Bad actors have been using cell phones to trigger IEDs for a while now.

about three weeks ago
top

Researchers Discover an 'Off Switch' For Pain in the Brain

LeadSongDog The real paper (1 comments)

The real paper is "Endogenous adenosine A3 receptor activation selectively alleviates persistent pain states" (in the latest issue of Brain at http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/brai...

about three weeks ago
top

Google Told To Expand Right To Be Forgotten

LeadSongDog Re:Google doesn't have to comply (193 comments)

EU is not going to shut Google down. What everyone's going to use? Bing?

A9, you insensitive clod!

about three weeks ago
top

Consortium Roadmap Shows 100TB Hard Drives Possible By 2025

LeadSongDog Kryder rate (215 comments)

To increase tenfold in 11 years, the Kryder rate https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/... would have to jump from 15%/year to 23%/year. While this is not fundamentally impossible, in an era of diminishing revenue for magnetic storage I can't see it happening.

about three weeks ago
top

Epson Printing device Software with regard to Android os Phone

LeadSongDog Author, author!!! (1 comments)

This seems to have been written by the same guy who translates Epson's manuals to Engslish.

about three weeks ago
top

Canada's Ebola Vaccine Nets Millions For Tiny US Biotech Firm

LeadSongDog Newlink's license invalid? (70 comments)

It would seem from http://www.cbc.ca/thecurrent/e... last week's coverage that Newlink had already violated the terms of their license. Seems like they sat on it as long as possible, then sublicensed to Merck. At this point though, who cares about the lousy $50M, they should just get on with producing the fricking stuff while testing in parallel.

about three weeks ago
top

What Would Have Happened If Philae Were Nuclear Powered?

LeadSongDog Re:Wouldn't it suffer eminent heat death? (523 comments)

Doesn't nuclear power work by boiling water?

No, it works by turning atoms into other atoms. What you do with the resulting heat and radiation is up to you. Whether you use it to drive a steam turbine, a Stirling engine or a thermocouple is up to you.

Well, an RTG works by containing atoms that are going to change themselves into other atoms. We call atoms with this property "radioactive". Still, you got the general idea.

about a month ago
top

What Would Have Happened If Philae Were Nuclear Powered?

LeadSongDog Re:May 2015 (523 comments)

It's been cold soaked for ten years already.

about a month ago
top

Halting Problem Proves That Lethal Robots Cannot Correctly Decide To Kill Humans

LeadSongDog Steering clear (2 comments)

if the human brain is a Turing machine, then humans can never decide this issue either...

There's your problem right there. The optimizer replaces that on the first pass with

if FALSE then humans can never decide this issue either...

Then on the second pass, it deletes the statement entirely, leaving

One curious corollary is that: a point that the authors deliberately steer well clear of

about 1 month ago
top

Military laser/radio tech proposed as alternative to laying costly fiber cable

LeadSongDog Meh (1 comments)

Not much new here, but a small increase in speed at a huge increase in price. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F...

about a month ago
top

A Worm's Mind In a Lego Body

LeadSongDog Re:Memory mapping? (200 comments)

The main thing holding us back is internet porn.

Once our robotic overlords figure out how to enjoy that, we may be safe from extinction.

about a month ago
top

A Worm's Mind In a Lego Body

LeadSongDog Re:Put the glasses on, stupid. (200 comments)

We already know how neural networks work and some are turning complete so they can do anything.

Autocorrect? Or perhaps not????

about a month ago

Submissions

top

Time to "get knotted"

LeadSongDog LeadSongDog writes  |  about a month and a half ago

LeadSongDog (1120683) writes "In a long-sought analysis in Phys Lett B, Itzhak Bars and Dmitry Rychkov have shown that the basic assumptions that underly Quantum Mechanics can actually be derived from M-theoretic explanations of string interactions. It all comes down to some rules on how strings are joined and split.
For those who just want the simple version: http://www.futurity.org/string..."

Link to Original Source
top

Ask Slashdot: Carbyne Suited For Space Elevator Cable?

LeadSongDog LeadSongDog writes  |  about a year ago

LeadSongDog (1120683) writes "Somebody check my numbers, this sounds too good to be true... A new ACS paper on the theoretical structure of carbyne gives its breaking strength at 10nN for a single atomic chain of carbon. A single C12 atom weighs (at 1g) 2e-25 N, so the chain could support 5e24 atoms at that acceleration. If the atoms repeat 17 times for every 2.2 nm along the chain, the self-supporting chain could be 6e14 m long. This seems to be way longer than the space elevator would need, so I'm inclined to think I've missed something basic. What am I overlooking?"
Link to Original Source
top

DC Light Now Available

LeadSongDog LeadSongDog writes  |  about a year ago

LeadSongDog (1120683) writes "The headline writers at PhysOrg report "New material gives visible light an infinite wavelength". Of course the details within are rather less spectacular: "Researchers from the FOM Institute AMOLF and the University of Pennsylvania have fabricated a material which gives visible light a nearly infinite wavelength". The original work uses language that makes clear they are speaking of the phase velocity of visible light, under the title "Experimental realization of an epsilon-near-zero metamaterial at visible wavelengths". Still, it's an interesting read. http://www.nature.com/nphoton/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nphoton.2013.256.html"
Link to Original Source
top

Ask Slashdot: When is Patent License Trading not Trolling?

LeadSongDog LeadSongDog writes  |  about a year ago

LeadSongDog (1120683) writes "A piece in yesterday's Forbes offers arguments on why not all "Non-Practicing Entities" are "Patent Trolls". Comments here on such businesses are often critical. Is there a right way to trade in patents for profit without abusing the process?"
Link to Original Source
top

(Can't help it): Uranus is holding a Trojan

LeadSongDog LeadSongDog writes  |  about a year ago

LeadSongDog (1120683) writes "Space.com is reporting on a 60km comet-like body in Lagrangian orbit around the Sun, locked to Uranus. This means a distant, but fairly accessible supply of water-ice, hence reaction mass, hydrogen and oxygen for robotic miners if we can just get them there with an energy source."
Link to Original Source
top

City-sized ice shelf breaks free

LeadSongDog LeadSongDog writes  |  about a year and a half ago

LeadSongDog (1120683) writes "Germany's TerraSAR-X satellite is showing that the Antarctic's Pine Island ice shelf has calved a 'berg of 720 square kilometres, "the size of Hamburg".

Angelika Humbert says "The Western Antarctic land ice is on land which is deeper than sea level. Its "bed" tends towards the land. The danger therefore exists that these large ice masses will become unstable and will start to slide". The article extrapolates that "If the entire West Antarctic ice shield were to flow into the Ocean, this would lead to a global rise in sea level of around 3.3 metres."

Goodbye Florida.
 "

Link to Original Source
top

Knotted flaky graphene oxide fibers are not weakened

LeadSongDog LeadSongDog writes  |  about a year and a half ago

LeadSongDog (1120683) writes "James Tour, in Advanced Materials, advises that his team has learned how to knot and weave graphene oxide fiber without losing strength. By mixing in large flakes, it keeps its bend radius relatively large at the knots. The resultant product reaches a 47GPa tensile modulus, just as strong as the native fiber. So, can this lesson be applied to carbon nanotubes, to fulfill Arthur C. Clarke's vision of a space elevator?

The full paper is at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/adma.201301065/abstract"

Link to Original Source
top

It's the kablooie that keeps on giving

LeadSongDog LeadSongDog writes  |  about a year and a half ago

LeadSongDog (1120683) writes "A new paper, complete with pretty pictures, on the arXiv at http://arxiv.org/pdf/1305.7399v1.pdf details some remarkable lessons from a local (inside our galaxy) supernova circa 1900. The formal publication is due to be out in Astrophysical Journal Letters on July 1, and a popsci blurb is available at http://phys.org/news/2013-06-remarkable-supernova.html for the busy readers of /.

Studying the radio and x-ray emissions (synchrotron radiation from energetic electrons at the shockwave front) allowed researchers to find variations in metal distribution around the sphere. They estimate the event produced 10^20kg of electron/positron pairs, nearly all of which have since recombined.

I for one am rather glad I wasn't nearby that day."

Link to Original Source
top

Time to disable texting from the driver's seat?

LeadSongDog LeadSongDog writes  |  about a year and a half ago

LeadSongDog (1120683) writes "The good folks at the American Automobile Association's Foundation for Traffic Safety have been funding the University of Utah to examine the distraction of hands-free controls. Fitted up with brain-monitor skullcaps, subjects were shown to be most distracted when they had to focus on voice commands, especially when drafting texts and emails. Once again, we find that multitasking is illusory, something always suffers."
Link to Original Source
top

Ask Slashdot: How will MS monetize this?

LeadSongDog LeadSongDog writes  |  about a year and a half ago

LeadSongDog (1120683) writes "The Beeb blurbs that MS will now be "giving" away Outlook, but it comes at a price: you have to run the (freebeer) Win8.1 update to get it. Other platforms still need to cough up the big bucks/pounds/Euros/yaddayadda. So how are they turning this into a revenue stream?"
Link to Original Source
top

Binary.. older than you thought!

LeadSongDog LeadSongDog writes  |  about a year and a half ago

LeadSongDog (1120683) writes "From our wait-a-minute...that's-no-moon! department, the mother corps advises that today's giant asteroid 1998 QE2 is actually the primary of a binary system. Hiding close to the biggie is a smaller (but still dangerous) 600 m diameter secondary. Seems 16% of large asteroids are binaries..."
Link to Original Source
top

Cheap tuned plasmonic nanoshells boost infrared conversion efficiency

LeadSongDog LeadSongDog writes  |  about 2 years ago

LeadSongDog (1120683) writes "Using inexpensive quantum nanodots in a colloidal suspension, researchers have boosted the IR conversion efficiency of PbS solar cells by a whopping 35%. While this still needs much work, anything that brings down cost while raising output has to be welcome. Further info at http://www.overclockersclub.com/news/33826/."
Link to Original Source

Journals

LeadSongDog has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?