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Here's What Your Car Could Look Like In 2030

LessThanObvious Re:As a side note, my own thoughts on future autos (137 comments)

How about starting with practical needs instead of futurist personal office on wheels crap. In most areas we need more trains and large buses that get people from suburbs to cities and between cities. Then we could use a large number of mid sized trolleys or shuttles to get people from the stations to their destinations. Individual rental vehicles could be available at the stations as needed to increase the flexibility of the system. We have tens of thousands of drivers traveling individually in large cities because the alternatives are not robust, clean, time efficient and highly-flexible. How many jobs could a serious project like that create? Oh no, let's just let legislators continue to suckle at the teat of the auto and oil lobbyists, because progress is too hard. Trillion dollar wars protect freedom, but infrastructure spending can clearly only lead to socialism.

5 hours ago
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LinkedIn Study: US Attracting Fewer Educated, Highly Skilled Migrants

LessThanObvious Re:Perspective (313 comments)

Everything you said is true. The U.S. ideals still exist though and there are plenty of us fighting to restore some decency in our care for others. The Republicans have long had a mind control lock on those you say "often really *aren't* alright" despite having the "I'm alright Jack, screw you" attitude. If the Fox News crowd ever wakes up to the facts of their own constant manipulation it could change quite a bit, but I think that will take a generation to weed out. Ultimately Americans love our country and even if we see it through the lens of reality mixed with hopes and ideals, there will never be another place that feels like home. I've traveled, but I could never really feel like I belong anywhere else. I hope America renews it's freedoms, becomes more progressive and inclusive and that in time becomes a place more Europeans could feel at home.

6 hours ago
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How the Pentagon's Robots Would Automate War

LessThanObvious Summary is misleading - from TFA (112 comments)

"The specter of Kill Bots waging war without human guidance or intervention has already sparked significant political backlash, including a potential United Nations moratorium on autonomous weapons systems. This issue is particularly serious when one considers that in the future, many countries may have the ability to manufacture, relatively cheaply, whole armies of Kill Bots that could autonomously wage war. This is a realistic possibility because today a great deal of cutting-edge research on robotics and autonomous systems is done outside the United States, and much of it is occurring in the private sector, including DIY robotics communities. The prospect of swarming autonomous systems represents a challenge for nearly all current weapon systems, which partly drives the emphasis on DEWs. (Directed-Energy Weapons)"

Also interesting was the comments on how privacy issues affect security of DoD staff, while they don't seem to concerned about how it affects civilian security.
See "Expanding Privacy Issues page" 19.

"Monitoring of individuals and populations using sensors, wearable devices, and IoT will provide detection and predictive analytics that can move toward a health maintenance-based, rather than a disease-based medical model, and also enhance operational readiness. However, there will be many risks involved as these systems are implemented, for example, the many ways that digital data or privacy information can be compromised, issues of ownership or of access to the data. These systems will also require new enterprise-level models for the management and exploitation of potentially huge amounts of health related data."

Above excerpts from "Policy Challenges of Accelerating Technological Change: Security Policy and Strategy Implications of Parallel Scientific Revolutions" by James Kadtke and Linton Wells II at CTNSP

7 hours ago
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Researchers Say the Tech Worker Shortage Doesn't Really Exist

LessThanObvious Re:Duh (378 comments)

An open market in the U.S. specifically. We don't want to, nor should we have to openly compete with foreign labor. It doesn't have to be eliminated, there is value in having some foreign labor, but it's our duty as Americans to put U.S. interests first. In order for the U.S. to produce more STEM workers the jobs have to be there for them when they graduate and the jobs available have to pay real money. Not enough people will be engineers because it is fun, many will become engineers if it's a virtual guarantee of a high wage position. Executive admins are making more than many engineers today and engineers are making the same as they did 10 years ago or more.

10 hours ago
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Cameron Accuses Internet Companies Of Giving Terrorists Safe Haven

LessThanObvious Re:In other words ... (160 comments)

What is it they want the internet companies to do that they are not? Maybe I'm dense, but I'm not clear what he believes they failed to do.

10 hours ago
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Two Google Engineers Say Renewables Can't Cure Climate Change

LessThanObvious Re:Deliberate (499 comments)

Yes, please. May I suggest we add
6. No Koch lobbyists allowed to pollute the decision making.

10 hours ago
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Microsoft Rolls Out Robot Security Guards

LessThanObvious Re:Robot tipping! (140 comments)

And I know robot Karate! Alert: Micro-bot senses danger.

yesterday
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Cops 101: NYC High School Teaches How To Behave During Stop-and-Frisk

LessThanObvious Re:Wouldn't time be better spent... (468 comments)

Educating the kids on how not to get hurt is about all they can do. The NYPD is so out of control and they still want to pretend they are doing the right thing. StopandFrisk needs to end, period. Broken Windows policing needs to end. There is no choice, but for young people of color in some areas to fear the police because the police don't give a fuck about their rights or even their physical safety. If a black man in New York wants to survive he can only be polite, immediately comply with all instructions no matter how stupid and either keep his hands on the wheel or on his head for the duration of the interaction. White people do actually give a shit, it will just take some time for the cops to listen.

yesterday
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Married Woman Claims Facebook Info Sharing Created Dating Profile For Her

LessThanObvious Re:Honest, honey... (182 comments)

The fake X close button is something I really fear will become a broad way of exploiting vulnerable users. Many of the X buttons even in seemingly legitimate pop-ups don't tell you anything about the action it will take even by doing a mouse over. Users are accustomed to blindly clicking the X to close even if it doesn't look like a regular Windows close button. I spent some time using the Firefox "inspect element" feature and I didn't find any that did something nasty on close, but it seems like this trend of embedding a close button or X into in-page popups is ripe for exploitation. I would encourage sites allowing this kind of advertising to define a standard to allow users to better know the safety of the close action. It would take a lot to train users to Alt-F4 every time they get one of those if they aren't running NoScript.

yesterday
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Court Rules Google's Search Results Qualify As Free Speech

LessThanObvious Re:Nothing to do with freedom of speech of 1st ame (137 comments)

I think that is a very true and logical assessment. It's just unfortunate that Google has become so ubiquitous. People can choose to use another search engine, but rarely do. It's already very difficult to run a business if Google isn't putting your business high in their ranks. I believe for the time being the listing process is mostly working, but as they continue on I worry that Google could become the gatekeepers of the internet. Pay the fee and kiss the ring or the internet will never know you exist.

about a week ago
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Can the US Actually Cultivate Local Competition in Broadband?

LessThanObvious Re:Split last-mile from ISP (135 comments)

That's what worked for DSL with the 1996 telecommunications act. The physical logistics of copper telephone wires worked out well for that. Just a cross connect to the competitor's DSLAM (Digital Service Line Access Multiplexor) which occupied space in the CO. It only really worked though, when the rates for the last mile were fixed at low rates.

I'd be very interested to know how the logistics of doing something like that for Cable could work out.

I don't have a clear idea of the equipment at the cable company hub locations. If the existing CLECs (Competitive Local Exchange Carriers) could get access into the cable networks and compete, it could do a lot for competition and rescue the remaining CLECs from obsolescence.

about a week ago
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The New-ish Technologies That Will Alter Your Career

LessThanObvious Re:Some technologies I worry about... (66 comments)

SDN - (Software Defined Networking) makes my list. Huge potential, but also huge potential to get it wrong or to insist on automated systems to replace humans that are perfectly capable of managing environments. I fear how complex and vendor software dependent the industry may become.

I agree with you about the risk of internet segmentation. Logically it makes a lot of sense, but there in lies the rub. Humans cannot be trusted with power, so even if segmenting the internet makes a degree of sense both technically and in terms of security, once segmented, it will never again enjoy real freedom.

Segmented in this case meaning anything from firewall choke points to separate physical networks to some global VLAN/MPLS scheme.

about a week ago
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Facebook Planning Office Version To Rival LinkedIn, Google

LessThanObvious Re:Who uses LinkedIn? (91 comments)

It's good for self promotion and too know whats happening in your former colleagues careers and maintain contact. I don't want to have to worry about updated personal email addresses for 300 people every time they change. Yes, I probably contact someone through the site at most twice a year, but it keeps me connected and gives exposure when wanted. I turn off public search-ability when I'm not looking for a job. I've also had at least one friend tell me an interviewer knocked him for not having a well developed Linkedin profile. I can almost understand that if you just have a resume on your desk and you are trying to evaluate someone, but once the actual human being is sitting in front of you in an interview, who gives a fuck about their Linkedin?

Facebook for work, no thanks. Facebook is not trusted and their thinking is off. Linkedin partly has value because it is outside your office sphere, but it is socially OK to be out there, where as being on job hunting websites is frowned upon by HR. Facebook for work would, at best be the all-out bullshit zone. A place where you network with peers and business contacts and paint some fluffed up edited version of yourself for professional consumption. In my reality there is more risk there than there is benefit. I have enough worries about what Linkedin does with my info, I won't be opening up more.

about a week ago
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Facebook Planning Office Version To Rival LinkedIn, Google

LessThanObvious Re:This article is useless (91 comments)

Better tools don't fix bad communication.

about a week ago
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Military Laser/Radio Tech Proposed As Alternative To Laying Costly Fiber Cable

LessThanObvious Re:(Vorsicht vor den Vogel!) damn birds (150 comments)

Is it too much to ask to get sharks with frickin' laser beams attached to their heads?

about a week ago
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Sony To Take On Netflix With Playstation Vue

LessThanObvious Re:Stupid (130 comments)

Don't worry, slowly but surely other companies will accept that the time to compete with Netflix was 2003, not 2014. Live streaming is a good area for others to focus, but not if it has to happen from a specific hardware platform. I do like what PBS and some other networks have done, and I appreciate the online availability, it's just hard to monetize. There is room in the market for multiple players, but even Amazon Instant Video has so so far disappointed me. When the say 40,000 titles available to watch on Amazon I have to wonder if they are including the pay per view titles and not just the Prime eligible. I got Prime for my grandmother since it was easier to give as a gift for a year, but I'm not impressed with the selection or the interface of the iPad app. I knew the fight was done the day I bought a Blue-ray player with a dedicated Netflix button on the remote. For that industry, getting the status of a dedicated button was like when Google became a verb. Yahoo! was dead the moment the mass media started using "Google" as the verb for search instead of "Search" or "Use as search engine". When I did the gift for Grandma I also noticed that my relatives could not grasp "Prime is just like Netflix". It was like "Netflix" was in English and any other service was something foreign they couldn't grasp.

about two weeks ago
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Linux Foundation Comments On Microsoft's Increasing Love of Linux

LessThanObvious Progress (162 comments)

The days when it seemed that Microsoft could have the whole pie all to itself is long gone. I'll call the steps they are taking progress. Office 365 availability on Linux and .Net opening up to Linux as open source sets a pretty good stage for real openness of choice. I hear from regular people all the time how much they like the Surface for work or how they wish they bough a Surface rather than iPad for work. They have stopped trying to hold back change, because that outright failed. They now at least seem to be embracing change. Now the real test is if they can affect change and actually lead at least with the piece of the pie where they can still fit. Windows Mobile may wander the desert without followers for many years, but if Windows 10 is well received they may actually survive the death of the desktop.

about two weeks ago
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ISPs Removing Their Customers' Email Encryption

LessThanObvious Re: DMCA (Defamation) (245 comments)

I like that argument and I hope it gets heard in front of a judge. I do wonder though since it is actually the packet from the upstream server that is modified and the sender is downgrading their security to accommodate, then sending an unmodified message is there a violation? Is their any legal protection that would stop an ISP from modifying the parameters, but not substance of the upstream mail server's packet? It seams like the upstream mail service provider is the one truly being wronged because the intent of their transmission has not been honored and has been modified without consent such as their ability to provide a secure service to their customer has been harmed.

about two weeks ago
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US School Installs 'Shooter Detection' System

LessThanObvious Re:Dumb idea ... Lots of assumptions .... (696 comments)

On face value I agree with gun registration, but in practice it is bad for our rights. As someone in a state where we have to register everything, it's next to impossible to get a carry permit and we now have to get a permit to buy ammo I'd say if I were in a state where the government didn't have a list of what I own I'd fight like hell to stop them from changing it. Gun control advocates and people who know absolutely nothing about guns are happy to enact overreaching regulations. It's clearly at the point now where having a gun in some parts of the country is more a legal liability than it is a protection for life and liberty. The Shot-spotter kind of technology has potential, but if they really want to do something about prevention then we have to stop giving media fame to violent idiots that are desperately seeking attention.

about two weeks ago
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ISPs Removing Their Customers' Email Encryption

LessThanObvious Re: DMCA (Defamation) (245 comments)

Obnoxious as their behavior is, I don't think the copyright violation holds. Worst case they aren't decrypting it, they are just causing the option to encrypt not to be presented. If the sending side agrees to send unencrypted, then it is effectively consenting to send in the clear. No matter what happens between your client and the server there is always a chance a server in the forwarding chain will not preserve the TLS connection, nor is there any guarantee in most cases that the message recipient will access the message over an encrypted channel. God help us all, because corporations sure can't help themselves.

about two weeks ago

Submissions

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Ask Slashdot: Is large scale video for entertainment a wise use of the internet?

LessThanObvious LessThanObvious writes  |  about a month ago

LessThanObvious (3671949) writes "In today's world services like Netflix, Youtube, Hulu and Amazon Instant Video are ubiquitous and generate a large amount of real time video traffic on the web. The question I put to you is whether or not this activity is a reasonable and healthy use of internet resources and is it a healthy social trend for the evolution of the internet? Is the internet to become a national or global replacement for broadcast television? Do massive video providers have any social obligation to cache content close to the users the serve to save WAN bandwidth? Do you believe the internet is prepared to absorb exponential growth in real time video along with traditional data traffic? Does there ever come a point when the internet has to split into functional zones whatever those may be (i.e. Business, Entertainment, Public, Government, Domestic, International, etc)? I do not mean for this to be a discussion of Net Neutrality, please set that aside in as much as it is possible in such a debate."
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Ask SlashDot: What should the NSA be able to do without a warrant?

LessThanObvious LessThanObvious writes  |  about 4 months ago

LessThanObvious (3671949) writes "We have a general consensus in the U.S. and abroad that says the NSA has overstepped their boundaries in data collection and surveillance. The costs to liberty, free speech, privacy rights as well as economic and foreign policy costs outlined in the New America Open Technology Institute July 2014 Policy Paper — "Surveillance Costs" have been broadly discussed. It seems now that there is enough political inertia post Snowden and enough economic incentive to make changes to protect U.S. competitive position and international trust relationships for real change to come about. It is also pretty much a given that an organization like the NSA with a multibillion dollar budget is not going to simply dry up and blow away.

In a world where we are trying to defend our nation and others around the globe from highly sophisticated cyber-crime, cyber-attack and serious terror threats at home and abroad, it does seem that the NSA and other agencies have a legitimate role to play. Let's imagine a world where the NSA and other agencies rewrite the rules of when and where information could be collected, allowing for adequate transparency and protections for U.S. and foreign individuals rights. How can we find the needle in a stack of haystacks if they are no longer permitted to disturb the haystack?

Now under those circumstances what should the NSA be allowed to do without a warrant?"

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