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What Happens To Society When Robots Replace Workers?

LessThanObvious Re:income redistribution, shorter work hours (596 comments)

That makes tremendous sense on face value and it would work if you were talking about one factory or maybe one industry, but when the whole economy in involved it won't arrive there at the same time. Management will never agree to that until they find themselves at the pointy end of the pitchforks. Things would have to become seriously desperate before it would happen and from what I've seen of people and from the manipulation of people by the rich and powerful, we would have a very hard time getting enough public unity to properly direct the effects of the pitchforks.

5 hours ago
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What Happens To Society When Robots Replace Workers?

LessThanObvious Re:When Robots Replace Workers? (596 comments)

Are you supposing that the robots would belong to the public and be operated for public benefit? I really doubt that being a likely outcome. Raw materials even when converted to products with nearly free labor are still not free, neither are they infinite. Those in power are not that keen on sharing with those that aren't contributing. The goal of much automation is to reduce the degree business must employ people. I think the degree automation will displace workers is often exaggerated, but it is having an impact and will no doubt be devastating to certain segments of the global workforce. I think people will find their way by leveraging their creativity and ability to adapt.

6 hours ago
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Seattle Police Held Hackathon To Redact Footage From Body Cameras

LessThanObvious Re:Why dashcams? (91 comments)

Absolutely. We should not be wasting time and money allowing free access to video footage. If someone has a legal claim or suspects police abuse in a specific situation that directly concerns them then there should be a means to obtain it, but it just isn't practical to make all of it available to any yahoo that wants hundreds of hours of footage and has no direct involvement in the filmed activities. Privacy is more important in this case than FOIA in my book and the police do not have the resources to waste redacting footage.

7 hours ago
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Investigation: Apple Failing To Protect Chinese Factory Workers

LessThanObvious Re:If the manufacturer added more value... (195 comments)

I'm a fan of the free market and not proposing a different economic system. I would just like to see ethical business practices all the way through the supply chain become a voluntary norm accepted and encouraged in the business community. My belief system just doesn't allow for exploiting anyone just because they are willing to be exploited.

3 days ago
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Marissa Mayer's Reinvention of Yahoo! Stumbles

LessThanObvious Re:It's time (222 comments)

I think you mean AOL. It baffles me that any analyst would want them to touch AOL. The problem with Yahoo is that people think of them as a forgotten relic from the 90's even though they have hugely popular services. AOL on the other hand is a forgotten relic from the 90's that would only further tarnish Yahoo as people would continue to use the companies in the same sentence. No offense to AOL, I don't even know that they do anymore I just know public perception. Yahoo needs to just keep at it and focus on finding the right young company to acquire that they can integrate and cross pollinate ad revenue and rebuild their brand with a younger generation.

4 days ago
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Investigation: Apple Failing To Protect Chinese Factory Workers

LessThanObvious Re:You have selected....... (195 comments)

I would like to see a cultural shift in business where instead of the company that designs the product taking a gigantic slice and the company that runs the retail store taking a giant slice, the manufacturer that invests the time and effort into making the product would get a much, much greater share. If the manufacturer was guaranteed 10% of the final retail price per unit on any product produced, no matter where it was made, we could actually demand a stop to human rights violations in return for paying them enough to compensate for their contribution to the product. That or we can let the big corporations have it all, because their magic design fairy dust is the only part of process that actually creates value.

4 days ago
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Google Proposes To Warn People About Non-SSL Web Sites

LessThanObvious Re:503 (394 comments)

You're not overreacting. You could say they are going too far, and certainly not everything needs encryption. It's largely unnecessary; if people don't know the difference on their own, then they should never transmit any sensitive data over the internet.

4 days ago
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RFID-Blocking Blazer and Jeans Could Stop Wireless Identity Theft

LessThanObvious Re:Hope it works better then my wallet (110 comments)

I don't know why we persist with such horrible security for an unnecessary convenience. If you have to wrap your card in foil or use a stainless steel wallet or buy special clothes, isn't the convenience lost at that point?

4 days ago
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Did Alcatraz Escapees Survive? Computer Program Says They Might Have

LessThanObvious Re:Myth Confirmed... (89 comments)

Yes, my girlfriend participated in a sanctioned open water swim ironically named Sharkfest. Hundreds of swimmers went from Alcatraz to shore, not one having any encounters with man eating sharks. There are great whites more out toward Golden Gate, but not so much inside the Bay. Even at that even a man eater will only feed when it's hungry so in a one time trip I think the odds are squarely in your favor.

4 days ago
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New AP Course, "Computer Science Principles," Aims To Make CS More Accessible

LessThanObvious Re:There are gender differences (208 comments)

I would agree with the business case for female coders. Females represent a large portion of the purchasing decisions for goods and also a large percentage of the user base for applications from business tools to iPhone apps. As time goes on we need women who know how to think like women so that applications and electronics are designed in ways that appeal to women. Technology products should be strait forward and gender agnostic whenever possible, but there will also be many applications and technology products where females are the primary target market. That said I'm really not sure that "for girls only" classes are the way to get results. I'd rather see everyone have access to quality training equally and focus on creating accessible entry level education that logically builds to serious college level coursework. There are also places in technology for people that aren't math geniuses. Many functional roles require advanced math, but it isn't true for every technology job. I have to wonder how many people of either gender get written of from technology fields because they are told advanced math skills are a must have for any technology education path.

5 days ago
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Ask Slashdot: How Should a Liberal Arts Major Get Into STEM?

LessThanObvious Re:Not a Real Question (279 comments)

Following that logic I wonder how effective the efforts will be to produce more STEM workers in the U.S.. When they say we need STEM workers clearly one of the things they mean is Computer Science, but I personally couldn't even give an educated guess as to what other more specific fields where they feel we have a supply shortage. Clearly not all paths are equal when it comes to tangible career prospects. If I were a young person looking at options, I'd really want to know which fields are likely to result in well compensated employment in the next ten years.

about a week ago
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Federal Court Nixes Weeks of Warrantless Video Surveillance

LessThanObvious Re:Firearms usage (440 comments)

Why would discharging a firearm outside be cause to search a home? In this case he's undocumented immigrant so possessing a firearm may be a crime, so it makes sense to see if he has more firearms. For a U.S. Citizen or legal resident alien I don't think they should have that ability based on a minor infraction committed outside the home.

about a week ago
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Hollywood's Secret War With Google

LessThanObvious Re:Shocking! (176 comments)

No, not specifically. I only mean in general sense that the less people understand their rights the less apt they are to defend them and the more people accept increasing government power the more apt we are to create an environment where such a regime could thrive. I wouldn't technically categorize anything currently happening in the U.S. as fascism.

about a week ago
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Hollywood's Secret War With Google

LessThanObvious Re:Shocking! (176 comments)

Not sure of the specifics on "24", but many cop drama's like "Criminal Minds" dumb down the viewers perception of their rights. They always seem to be able to instantly find any information about anyone through online means including by hacking and there is absolutely zero discussion of a warrant or any approval. It's just OK because they are trying to catch the super evil bad guy. If your perception of the constitution, your rights and the limitations on police power where based on television, you likely wouldn't have a clue what they are actually supposed to be allowed to do. From the few episodes of "24" I've seen I believe the same issues exist there.

about two weeks ago
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Hollywood's Secret War With Google

LessThanObvious Re:Meanwhile Congress just passed SOPA in secret (176 comments)

First: on the passage of SOPA, those damn fuckers, unbelievable. Second: If Comcast starts inspecting my traffic, I am absolutely going to lose my shit. Canceling my service is not nearly enough. It's not the job of a customer's ISP to police their activity.

about two weeks ago
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Is Enterprise IT More Difficult To Manage Now Than Ever?

LessThanObvious Diffused decision making (241 comments)

A lot of the technology itself has gotten easier, the products available are robust and fully developed. The difficulty is often as it always has been in the human side of the business. People in the past didn't have options outside of IT and we used to actually be able to say no when someone wanted to bring in their own device or use some outside service. IT didn't used to have much power, but now we have almost none. Businesses pay us because we are experts in our field, but then constantly make decisions that contradict our input. So what if marketing wants some cloud thing, since when should their desires matter in the equation? I long for management that says "I don't give a fuck what you want. Tell us what you need, we can define the solution if one is warranted." My job got easier when I stopped fighting the businesses on decisions, but now I know I'm not actually doing what I think is in the interests of the companies I work for, rather just bending with the wind so nobody actually has to deal with conflict.

about two weeks ago
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"Lax" Crossdomain Policy Puts Yahoo Mail At Risk

LessThanObvious Re:Silly me (49 comments)

Yahoo isn't particularly modern. They are in transition trying to be modern while being shackled to their legacy. They are about to lose me as a customer. The new versions of their mobile apps for Yahoo! Mail and Yahoo! Finance ask for way to many permissions. Next time I have to get a new phone and I can't have the old versions their apps are history and so is my account. Not good for them since I'm one of the hold outs that pays for POP mail access, which I'm glad to have so I can suck down all my mail to reduce it's exposure to Big Data and do it in an encrypted format. I'm sorry for Yahoo that Google fooled us all into thinking they were "less commercial" in their early days due the lack of ads on the search page, what fools we were. Now Google is a monster we all helped create and we killed all their competition.

about two weeks ago
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Facebook Offers Solution To End Drunken Posts

LessThanObvious Damn Facebook (134 comments)

Anyone have a polite way of telling people that you don't want them to take digital photos of you without sounding like a paranoid antisocial weirdo?

I only use really bad blurry pictures for my own profile pics on the web and I don't let people tag me in posts, but the sheer number of pics that I show up in online without my consent means most likely Facebook and the like will ID me even though I don't participate. It really annoys me that even in party situations the social norm is not to ask for any consent or even tell people you are about to take a photo. They just want to document their social life for world to see and I want the opposite, a completely undocumented social life.

about two weeks ago
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How Your In-Store Shopping Affects the Ads You See On Facebook

LessThanObvious Re:I love contextually useful ads. (69 comments)

There is nothing wrong with that attitude and it isn't all that uncommon, but at the same time it's reasonable for the rest of us not to want that. I had to pay $2 extra for a magazine at the grocery store just so it wouldn't end up in my consumer profile. I don't have a solution for getting Google and Facebook paid without whoring out my personal information, but I really think I should be able to walk into the grocery store and get my discounts for being a loyal shopper without them taking every scrap of information they can and linking it into some damn profile I wish didn't exist. I can choose not to use Google and Facebook, but I really can't reasonably avoid brick and mortar stores. This future cashless society is also going to be a privacy-less society if we continue on our current path. I don't consider it to be in my best interest to have every detail of my existence known by a bunch of corporate marketing weasels. Granted, they don't actually care what I do on a the weekend, they just want to sell me more of whatever that is, but once information is recorded and organized and available online we lose all control of who sees it and for what reason.

about two weeks ago
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Congress Passes Bill Allowing Warrantless Forfeiture of Private Communications

LessThanObvious Re:Congressman Amash's letter sent to Collea (379 comments)

Agreed. I read it and I don't see where it authorizes any collection, but rather states limits on retention of information collected under other authorization. Writer Julian Hattem and Rep. Justin Amash need to get their facts strait. If you want to attack the that bill the better argument would be, why the fuck do they get to keep the unauthorized stuff for 5 years? 120 days ought to be enough time to decide if the content is or isn't legally justified to retain, even at the pace of government. Instead of filtering and retaining current data of interest, they want a crystal ball that can see five years into the past even for data belonging to U.S. persons not suspected of any wrong doing. Oh, and if you encrypt it, then they have no retention limit. Then again we don't have it that bad today. Henry Ford used to send men to his factory workers homes and if they had too many liquor bottles around, they would be warned and reinspected shortly there after. I'd call that more invasive than reading my email.

about two weeks ago

Submissions

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Ask Slashdot: Is large scale video for entertainment a wise use of the internet?

LessThanObvious LessThanObvious writes  |  about 2 months ago

LessThanObvious (3671949) writes "In today's world services like Netflix, Youtube, Hulu and Amazon Instant Video are ubiquitous and generate a large amount of real time video traffic on the web. The question I put to you is whether or not this activity is a reasonable and healthy use of internet resources and is it a healthy social trend for the evolution of the internet? Is the internet to become a national or global replacement for broadcast television? Do massive video providers have any social obligation to cache content close to the users the serve to save WAN bandwidth? Do you believe the internet is prepared to absorb exponential growth in real time video along with traditional data traffic? Does there ever come a point when the internet has to split into functional zones whatever those may be (i.e. Business, Entertainment, Public, Government, Domestic, International, etc)? I do not mean for this to be a discussion of Net Neutrality, please set that aside in as much as it is possible in such a debate."
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Ask SlashDot: What should the NSA be able to do without a warrant?

LessThanObvious LessThanObvious writes  |  about 5 months ago

LessThanObvious (3671949) writes "We have a general consensus in the U.S. and abroad that says the NSA has overstepped their boundaries in data collection and surveillance. The costs to liberty, free speech, privacy rights as well as economic and foreign policy costs outlined in the New America Open Technology Institute July 2014 Policy Paper — "Surveillance Costs" have been broadly discussed. It seems now that there is enough political inertia post Snowden and enough economic incentive to make changes to protect U.S. competitive position and international trust relationships for real change to come about. It is also pretty much a given that an organization like the NSA with a multibillion dollar budget is not going to simply dry up and blow away.

In a world where we are trying to defend our nation and others around the globe from highly sophisticated cyber-crime, cyber-attack and serious terror threats at home and abroad, it does seem that the NSA and other agencies have a legitimate role to play. Let's imagine a world where the NSA and other agencies rewrite the rules of when and where information could be collected, allowing for adequate transparency and protections for U.S. and foreign individuals rights. How can we find the needle in a stack of haystacks if they are no longer permitted to disturb the haystack?

Now under those circumstances what should the NSA be allowed to do without a warrant?"

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