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U.S. Supreme Court Upholds Religious Objections To Contraception

Lorien_the_first_one Re:Supreme Court did *not* say corps are people .. (1330 comments)

I know this is a late comment, but I like your comment because it reminds us of the way power is delegated. The people delegate power to the states. The states delegate power to the corporations. What our culture seems to have forgotten is the the people are still on top.

Now if we can only remember what happened that brought us here.

about 4 months ago
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Supreme Court Rules Against Aereo Streaming Service

Lorien_the_first_one Re:One disturbing bit: (484 comments)

Seems like a maintenance plan would help cover the cost of upkeep.

about 5 months ago
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Supreme Court Rules Against Aereo Streaming Service

Lorien_the_first_one Re:One disturbing bit: (484 comments)

I think it's pretty fair to say that we assume that the judges understand the technology at hand. I'm not sure they do.

about 5 months ago
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Poor US Infrastructure Threatens the Cloud

Lorien_the_first_one Re:NSA aint helping either (177 comments)

I think you are pretty close, but I think that the real problem for the NSA is the possibility of real competition to provide internet access. Imagine how tough the job will be if the NSA had to get cooperation from hundreds of ISPs like they have in Japan. The duopoly here is very convenient for the NSA but a nightmare for the rest of us.

Had we declared the owners of the pipes to be common carriers and imposed open access rules upon them, we'd have something like what Japan has: fast internet access with hundreds of ISPs vying for my money. Instead, we have cable and telcos who operate on one principle: make sure that the CEO can have a few vacation homes sprawled across the world, send his kids to private schools until they are married and allow him and his extended family to live in gated communities. The members of the board of directors get similar benefits, but to a lesser extent.

Oh, one more thing. The corporations participating in the duopoly need to siphon enough money from the economy to capture the agencies that regulate them, except for the NSA, which in theory, can't be bought. Snowden proved that, but not in the way the NSA had in mind.

In sum, the duopoly will slow the net down, but it will also provide a few powerful leverage points for the government while concentrating revenue into a few companies willing to cooperate. Yeah, that sums it up.

about a year ago
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Ask Slashdot: Linux Security, In Light of NSA Crypto-Subverting Attacks?

Lorien_the_first_one Re:Best Strategy - No encryption (472 comments)

This is an interesting point. No matter how much data they collect, someone has to look at it and make a judgement call about it.

about a year ago
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Ask Slashdot: Linux Security, In Light of NSA Crypto-Subverting Attacks?

Lorien_the_first_one Re:Can you sleep soundly? (472 comments)

Nice sig. Nice post, too. We each have to choose our battles carefully. In the meantime, enjoy life.

about a year ago
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Ask Slashdot: Linux Security, In Light of NSA Crypto-Subverting Attacks?

Lorien_the_first_one Re:Pointless Worrying (472 comments)

A farm of computers, eh? How big is it? Here's an article from Schneier that discusses the physical limitations of computation relative to brute force attacks for private keys:

https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2009/09/the_doghouse_cr.html

To put it simply, brute force attacks are about trying every possible combination in a counter. Just to run a counter through 256 bits, You're going to need all the power of the sun for 32 years or more, or a supernova. Take your pick. That doesn't include power for any other useful computation. And then of course, there is time. How much time do you have?

The computer scientists of the world who believe in freedom will be happy to put the kibosh on on any code that permits side-attacks on encryption software. That is where the weakness is more likely to be, not the encryption algorithms.

Now I could be completely wrong about this, but based on the best available information I have, I don't think anyone is capable of brute force attacks against strong encryption except for poorly implemented crypto or really weak passwords.

about a year ago
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Microsoft: the 'Scroogled' Show Must Go On

Lorien_the_first_one Re:Scroogled, ha ha (286 comments)

Yeah, I guess you're right. Your examples seem worse than forgetting to update the SSL certificates for Azure, or permitting a complete failure of the London Stock Exchange for 8 hours the day after the Fed announces the bailout of AIG. For an interesting analysis of Microsoft network security that was presented at DEFCON 18, go here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RXFoS8HTI6E

If after watching that, you still feel that Google is doing such a poor job with reliability and security, good luck with Microsoft.

about a year and a half ago
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Microsoft: the 'Scroogled' Show Must Go On

Lorien_the_first_one Re:Scroogled, ha ha (286 comments)

Wow. What a showstopper.

about a year and a half ago
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Microsoft: the 'Scroogled' Show Must Go On

Lorien_the_first_one Re:Scroogled, ha ha (286 comments)

Given that Microsoft isn't alert enough to keep their SSL certificates up to date with Azure (one, among many other high profile failures), I trust Google more than Microsoft. In the end, I can only hope that my trust is well founded.

about a year and a half ago
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Judge Invalidates 13 Motorola Patent Claims Against Microsoft

Lorien_the_first_one Re:A humble suggestion to tech companies: (109 comments)

Microsoft will never let lawsuits go to trial if they can help it. They surely love those NDAs that help seal the deal. Barnes and Noble made a pretty big stink about it, and with it, offered good reasons to believe that Microsoft was one of the biggest offenders.

about 2 years ago
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Economists Argue Patent System Should Be Abolished

Lorien_the_first_one Re:Been saying that...Wrong, Simply Wrong. (376 comments)

Bessen and Meurer are in agreement. They found that patents tend to substitute for R&D. I think they tend to substitute for customer service, too.

about 2 years ago
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Economists Argue Patent System Should Be Abolished

Lorien_the_first_one Re:Been saying that...Wrong, Simply Wrong. (376 comments)

So lets see if your claims of progress are born out by the facts in the paper:

"Simply eyeballing the big trends shows that patenting has exploded over the
last decades. In 1983 in the United States, 59,715 patents were issued; by 2003,
189,597 patents were issued; and in 2010, 244,341 new patents were approved. In
less than 30 years, the flow of patents more than quadrupled. By contrast, neither
innovation nor research and development expenditure nor factor productivity
have exhibited any particular upward trend. According to the Bureau of Labor
Statistics, annual growth in total factor productivity in the decade 1970 –1979 was
about 1.2 percent, while in the decades 1990 –1999 and 2000 –2009 it has been a bit
below 1 percent. Meanwhile, US research and development expenditure has been
oscillating for more than three decades in a narrow band around 2.5 percent of
GDP. The recent explosion of patents, in other words, has not brought about any
additional surge in useful innovations and aggregate productivity. In new industries
such as biotechnology and software —where innovation was already thriving in their
absence —patents have been introduced without any positive impact on the rate
of innovation. The software industry is an important case in point. In a dramatic
example of judge-made law, software patents became possible for the first time in
the early 1990s. Bessen and Meurer, in a large body of empirical work culminating
in Patent Failure (2008), have studied the consequences of this experiment and have
concluded that it damaged social welfare."

That is from page 4 in the report. So for *30 years*, R&D as a percentage of GDP has stagnated despite a quadrupling of patents issued. is that progress? The authors state that there is *NO* empirical evidence to suggest that patent actually increase innovation or productivity. None. I agree with the author and you're free to disagree. But the facts even from the introduction seem pretty plain to me.

If you didn't make your invention by now, someone else would have done it just for the first mover advantage.

about 2 years ago
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Hidden Viral Gene Discovered In GMO Crops

Lorien_the_first_one How about labeling GMOs now? (391 comments)

Do the same people who stridently assert that labels for GMOs are not required think the same after this?

This is probably the tip of the iceberg.

about 2 years ago
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Anti-GMO Activist Recants

Lorien_the_first_one Re:This is a rare breed of human. (758 comments)

We're going to get labeling and that's the end of it. Political will is mounting. It's going to happen. Get over it.

about 2 years ago
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Anti-GMO Activist Recants

Lorien_the_first_one Re:This is a rare breed of human. (758 comments)

Clearly, caveat emptor is your place. Who needs a disinterested third party to ensure that transactions are fair?

about 2 years ago

Submissions

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Pandora goofs on Privacy on Samsung BluRay Player, insecure payment site

Lorien_the_first_one Lorien_the_first_one writes  |  about 2 years ago

Lorien_the_first_one (1178397) writes "I have a problem with Pandora Free on a Samsung BluRay player. Pandora plays fine on my computer and my phone, but when I play it on my BluRay player, I have an interesting problem. I activated my free Pandora account on my BluRay player the first day that I got it and had no problems until about a week later. Now, when I try to access Pandora on the box, it loads someone else's playlist. If I exit to switch users, I can see the other account there. When I try to access my own account, I'm prompted to enter my password. This has happened several times already. I got up to 4 other accounts on my box now. I contacted Samsung and they pointed me to Pandora. I wrote to Pandora and got no response. I tried to pay for the service to see if that will cause reactivation, but there is no SSL encryption on their website for payment. Is anyone else having this problem?"
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5 Million Farmers Sue Monsanto for $7.7 Billion

Lorien_the_first_one Lorien_the_first_one writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Lorien_the_first_one (1178397) writes "From the article, "aunching a lawsuit against the very company that is responsible for a farmer suicide every 30 minutes, 5 million farmers are now suing Monsanto for as much as 6.2 billion euros (around 7.7 billion US dollars). The reason? As with many other cases, such as the ones that led certain farming regions to be known as the ‘suicide belt’, Monsanto has been reportedly taxing the farmers to financial shambles with ridiculous royalty charges. The farmers state that Monsanto has been unfairly gathering exorbitant profits each year on a global scale from “renewal” seed harvests, which are crops planted using seed from the previous year’s harvest.""
Link to Original Source
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LFTR in 5 Minutes or, Why aren't we using Thorium for nuclear power?

Lorien_the_first_one Lorien_the_first_one writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Lorien_the_first_one (1178397) writes "Seems that this video is going viral. The video points out all the advantages of Thorium as nuclear fuel over Uranium: lower cost, the reactor shuts itself down when damage occurs, the waste is much easier to handle and contain, and Thorium is far more abundant than Uranium. So why aren't we using Thorium for nuclear power instead of Uranium?"
Link to Original Source
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Evidence of the dawn of the carbon age

Lorien_the_first_one Lorien_the_first_one writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Lorien_the_first_one (1178397) writes "Technology Review of MIT reports that carbon nanotubes are being used to fabricate complex circuits. From the article, "The first three-dimensional carbon nanotube circuits, made by researchers at Stanford University, could be an important step in making nanotube computers that could be faster and use less power than today's silicon chips. Such a computer is still at least 10 years off, but the Stanford work shows it is possible to make stacked circuits using carbon nanotubes. Stacked circuits cram more processing power in a given area, and also do a better job dissipating waste heat.""
Link to Original Source
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Desire2Learn wins patent fight with Blackboard

Lorien_the_first_one Lorien_the_first_one writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Lorien_the_first_one writes "PatentlyO reports that the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (aka "the patent court"), has ruled against Blackboard due to for 38 claims in their patents. In the appeals ruling, the court found all claims in the patents to be invalid based upon indefinite claim construction.

This particular case seems to turn on the point made by the court that "It is well settled that 'if one employs means-plus-function language in a claim, one must set forth in the specification an adequate disclosure showing what is meant by that language.'" Looks like claim construction is going to have to be a lot more specific in order to prevail.

Some may recall that Blackboard won at trial against Desire2Learn, and that the USPTO ruled later that 44 claims in Blackboard patents were invalid. Seems like the tide is staring to turn on software patents."

Link to Original Source
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Exploit for Linux Kernel 2.6.30+ Published

Lorien_the_first_one Lorien_the_first_one writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Lorien_the_first_one writes "The Register reports that "A recently published attack exploiting newer versions of the Linux kernel is getting plenty of notice because it works even when security enhancements are running and the bug is virtually impossible to detect in source code reviews."

The article points out that several areas of the kernel, in particular, the function "setuid", are involved in this new exploit. "The exploit code was released Friday by Brad Spengler of grsecurity, a developer of applications that enhance the security of the open-source OS. While it targets Linux versions that have yet to be adopted by most vendors, the bug has captured the attention of security researchers, who say it exposes overlooked weaknesses."

What I find interesting about the article is that although it focuses on newer versions of the kernel, near the end of the article, they offer the following food for thought: "Setuid is well-known as a chronic security hole," Rob Graham, CEO of Errata Security wrote in an email. "Torvalds is right, it's not a kernel issue, but it is a design 'flaw' that is inherited from Unix. There is no easy solution to the problem, though, so it's going to be with us for many years to come."

A chronic security hole? In Linux?"

Link to Original Source
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Yet Another Linux Patent Agreement with MS

Lorien_the_first_one Lorien_the_first_one writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Lorien_the_first_one writes "ZDNet reports that yet another company has signed a patent protection deal with Microsoft. According to the article by Mary Jo Foley, "On July 15, Microsoft signed a patent-coverage deal with Melco Holdings, the Japanese-based parent company of Buffalo Inc. and Buffalo Group. Buffalo makes network-attached storage (NAS) and routers, including the LinkStation and AirStation products." Many who witnessed and still remember the Microsoft-Novell agreement were critical of the decision."
Link to Original Source
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Google Announces ChromeOS

Lorien_the_first_one Lorien_the_first_one writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Lorien_the_first_one (1178397) writes "Looks like Google has announced their own operating system, ChromeOS. Larry Dignan offers coverage at ZDNet for your perusal: "Google is planning to launch lightweight operating system dubbed the Chrome OS that'll target netbooks and Web apps. With the move--clearly targeted at Microsoft--Google's software stack has come into sharp focus in just the last 24 hours. It should be noted, however, that Google's stack is still being formed."

Larry offers some very interesting analysis of the implications as well as a forecast for the market and the impact ChromeOS could have on other players in the operating system market."
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A Patent Thicket for Hybrid Cars - From Toyota

Lorien_the_first_one Lorien_the_first_one writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Lorien_the_first_one (1178397) writes "Toyota is hoping to benefit from new Obama Administration regulations for automobiles here in the US. According to the Wall Street Journal, "Since it started developing the gas-electric Prius more than a decade ago, Toyota has kept its attorneys just as busy as its engineers, meticulously filing for patents on more than 2,000 systems and components for its best-selling hybrid. Its third-generation Prius, which hit showrooms in May, accounts for about half of those patents alone.

"Toyota's goal: to make it difficult for other auto makers to develop their own hybrids without seeking licensing from Toyota, as Ford Motor Co. already did to make its Escape hybrid and Nissan Motor Co. has for its Altima hybrid."
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Free Linux Software closes Brazil's Digital Divide

Lorien_the_first_one Lorien_the_first_one writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Lorien_the_first_one (1178397) writes "The Huffington Post's has a very interesting story on the economic benefits of Linux in a down economy. Journalist Eric Ehrmann tells us that, "Fifty million Brazilian students will have Christmas in July when software Santa slips down the chimney to give them a free ticket on the information highway.

"With Microsoft software licenses costing up to 1000 percent more in Brazil than in the US, the ProInfo program launched by the government of president Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva reduces dependence on costly foreign software just as the sugar ethanol program for cars reduces dependence on expensive foreign oil. The program, administered through the national education secretariat. provides free operating systems, backbone and educational content employing Linux, Debian and KD3 freeware."

Looks like Brazil didn't "get the facts", and a new generation of kids are being exposed to and growing up with Linux."

Link to Original Source
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Canada rejects business method patents

Lorien_the_first_one Lorien_the_first_one writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Lorien_the_first_one writes "Canadian Patent Appeal Board Rules Against Business Method Patents

The Canadian Patent Appeal Board determined that "[Yet] the panel delivered very strong language rejecting the mere possibility of business method patents under Canadian law. The panel noted that 'since patenting business methods would involve a radical departure from the traditional patent regime, and since the patentability of such methods is a highly contentious matter, clear and unequivocal legislation is required for business methods to be patentable.'"

"In applying that analysis to the Amazon.com one-click patent, the panel concluded that 'concepts or rules for the more efficient conduct of online ordering, are methods of doing business. Even if these concepts or rules are novel, ingenious and useful, they are still unpatentable because they are business methods.'" Looks like the US courts could face some peer pressure. :)"

Link to Original Source
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Europe is testing 12.5 Gbs Wireless

Lorien_the_first_one Lorien_the_first_one writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Lorien_the_first_one (1178397) writes "Science news reports that in Europe, a Breakthrough For Post-4G Communications has been announced. A public-private consortium known as IPHOBAC, has been developing new communications technology that is near commercialization now. From the article, "With much of the mobile world yet to migrate to 3G mobile communications, let alone 4G, European researchers are already working on a new technology able to deliver data wirelessly up to 12.5Gb/s.

"The technology — known as 'millimetre (mm)-wave' or microwave photonics — has commercial applications not just in telecommunications (access and in-house networks) but also in instrumentation, radar, security, radio astronomy and other fields."

That's great for Europe, but here in the US, I suspect that patent interests will try to stymie the adoption of such technology until they can get exclusive control of it here."
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Tivo wins appeal on patents for pause, ffwd, rwd

Lorien_the_first_one Lorien_the_first_one writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Lorien_the_first_one writes "Well, here it is. After years of wrangling, Tivo has won it's day in court against EchoStar, now known as the Dish Network, "when the Supreme Court declined to take up Dish Network's appeal, forcing the satellite television company to pay $104 million in damages." According to the article, "TiVo originally won a patent infringement case in 2004 against Dish, which was then named EchoStar Communications. It charged that Dish illegally copied its technology, which allows people to pause, rewind and record live television on digital video recorders." Despite an injunction, Dish continued distribution of the set-top boxes in the belief that their software avoided infringing the patents owned by Tivo. Now the case goes back to the lower court for review to see if indeed they did avoid those patents. Say, isn't Tivo using Linux underneath? Doesn't that open them up to claims from people like the Free Software Foundation?"
Link to Original Source
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Monsanto uses food patents against farmers

Lorien_the_first_one Lorien_the_first_one writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Lorien_the_first_one (1178397) writes "Vanity Fair describes how Monsanto goes after farmers for collecting their own seeds after a harvest. According to the article, "This radical departure from age-old practice has created turmoil in farm country. Some farmers don't fully understand that they aren't supposed to save Monsanto's seeds for next year's planting. Others do, but ignore the stipulation rather than throw away a perfectly usable product. Still others say that they don't use Monsanto's genetically modified seeds, but seeds have been blown into their fields by wind or deposited by birds.""

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