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How long ago did you last assemble a computer?

Loughla Re:"assemble" or "reassmeble" (136 comments)

Have you ever read John Dies at the End?

The Axe Paradox at the beginning of that book haunts my nightmares.

yesterday
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Senate Bill Would Ban Most Bulk Surveillance

Loughla Re:A sad perspective (173 comments)

It turns out that spying on Europe is perfectly legal in the US after this law passes, and that spying on the US is perfectly legal in Europe. . . .

Lucky for everyone's citizens, no European country and the US are incredibly close allies.

2 days ago
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A 24-Year-Old Scammed Apple 42 Times In 16 Different States

Loughla Re:Exploited procedural loophole (403 comments)

Both times I've done it, though, I used my phone to look up the generic number for the credit card company. Don't blindly trust anyone* and use their number on their card. God only knows where that's actually going.

* Except Google, apparently. . . . Yikes.

2 days ago
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London Police Placing Anti-Piracy Warning Ads On Illegal Sites

Loughla Re: uno (158 comments)

(Generally older) People who Google items like, "Where can I watch Dear John" and "New Will and Grace"

I am woefully out of touch with culture, but you get the idea.

2 days ago
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Gaza's Only Power Plant Knocked Offline

Loughla Re:sigh. bailing wire? (825 comments)

If it's oiled wire, stored in oiled paper, it's actually meant for concrete work with re-bar, but is actually used most often to string low-charge electric fences. It is commonly used with horses in conjunction with white, vinyl warning fence. You get anywhere from 50-200 feet per spool.

Baling wire is substantially thicker, un-oiled, and comes in much larger spools; 500-1000 feet per spool.

The spools in oil paper are meant to be strung by hand and not intended to be used for tying anything long-term; hence the lighter gauge. In fact, it's meant to hold re-bar together long enough for the concrete to be poured, thereby securing the re-bar and negating the need for the wire. Baling wire is intended to be strung by machine, and exists mainly to tie things together for seasons (and hold together the entire Midwest's infrastructure). Square bales that use baling wire must be stored out of the elements, so the wire being un-oiled is not an issue.

To the GP: If you use baling twine, then your machinery sucks, sell that P.O.S. Oliver and buy something made in the last fifty years. I bet you run narrow base Allis-Chalmers too, don't you?

2 days ago
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Mt. Gox Gone? Apparent Theft Shakes Bitcoin World

Loughla Re:Vive le Galt! (695 comments)

It's easier to lug around $100 than it is to lug around six chickens and a goat.

about 5 months ago
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Mt. Gox Gone? Apparent Theft Shakes Bitcoin World

Loughla Re:Vive le Galt! (695 comments)

So, I assume you propose a barter system then?

Be less ridiculous.

about 5 months ago
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The Bitcoin Death Star: KnC Plans 10 Megawatt Data Center In Sweden

Loughla Re: How the fuck does this thing work, why is it r (250 comments)

You would think that they would have known better than to try to bullshit such an intelligent userbase with some retard-obvious shit like that.

You're talking about slashdot, correct? Have you ever used that site and looked at the comments? I'll be surprised if half of the people even notice the page changed. As long as it's shiny, they'll be happy.

about 6 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Are AdBlock's Days Numbered?

Loughla Re:zero tolerance and who owns my computer (731 comments)

So all of those websites that you currently access for free then. They were around back in the early days of the internet? All of the free content you consume, it was available, too? All of the people who are currently connected, they've always been on-line then?

Like it or not, now that the entire world is connected, someone has to pay. Please note that I'm not saying I agree with the ad model we currently have, I'm just saying that your view is incredibly short-sighted and immature.

about 6 months ago
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How would you use science to innovate upon sports?

Loughla Re:Breed out the need for sports (253 comments)

Maybe just blindly reproduce[. . .]

The fact that this isn't recreation to you makes me quite sad for your right hand.

about 6 months ago
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Billion Year Storage Media

Loughla Re:The authors don't trust their own invention (204 comments)

Couldn't we just etch everything into stone, then encapsulate it in concrete or other similarly hard medium, and put it into orbit around the moon? Wouldn't that last a while?

about 10 months ago
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Bill Gates Acknowledges Ctrl+Alt+Del Was a Mistake

Loughla Re:Redundant keys (665 comments)

Semicolon; damnit; why don;t people use that one more often; I find it can replace all other punctuation;

about 10 months ago
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DEA Argues Oregonians Have No Protected Privacy Interest In Prescription Records

Loughla Re:DEA cannot win this. Why bother? (455 comments)

Oh, I'm quite sure they exist. Just as people who believe that throwing acid in a young girl's face is preferable to educating that girl. There's really no difference between the two.

Hyperbole is a terrible argumentative tool

Seriously, though, here are the arguments against what you said first, according to a highly educated young officer that I'm friends with:

They enforce laws against opiates. This jacks up the price, and driving addicts to commit crimes to get a fix. This also decreases the quality and consistancy of the supply, killing people.

"They don't have to do the drugs. An increased cost, and more danger would tell me that I should probably stop doing opiates. Addiction is no excuse for breaking the law. Also, saying that addicts HAVE to break the law to provide for their addiction is really only half of the argument. They have another option: getting clean."

They enforce laws against cocaine, turning people towards more easily obtained, yet far more harmful stimulants like meth.

"Those two things are VERY dissimilar in how they act in your body. That's a bad argument. Coke heads don't go to meth. They go to crack. Meth use and cocaine use are in entirely separate areas of the country at the micro-scale, and in entirely separate communities at the macro-scale."

The enforce laws against psychedelics, depriving most of the country from one of the most awe inspiring, and still incredibly safe experiences life has to offer.

"You could, you know, do something else awe inspiring. Ever seen the grand canyon? If your life is so boring that you MUST have psychedelics to enjoy it, you need to evaluate the choices you make."

Again, I'm the messenger for him, I just felt the need to rebut your argument from one of those "pants on head retarded" people you're talking about.

about 10 months ago
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DEA Argues Oregonians Have No Protected Privacy Interest In Prescription Records

Loughla Re:DEA cannot win this. Why bother? (455 comments)

There are, and this may be hard to understand, people who genuinely believe that the only way to remove drugs from the streets - regardless of proof to the contrary - is to make them illegal and put people in jail for them. These people believe that personal responsibility should be enough to keep people from doing drugs, and that if we make them legal, the problem will only get worse.

For proof of the fact that these people exist, and that they do not agree with your undergraduate statistics and crime course arguments, please consult anyone labeled 'officer'.

about 10 months ago
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DEA Argues Oregonians Have No Protected Privacy Interest In Prescription Records

Loughla Re:DEA cannot win this. Why bother? (455 comments)

You do understand that the DEA enforces more than just marijuana laws, correct? This is a terrible argument, and it's modded insightful. For shame, /.. For Shame.

about 10 months ago
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DEA Argues Oregonians Have No Protected Privacy Interest In Prescription Records

Loughla Re:Medical records privacy act? (455 comments)

What that means is that a cop can go into a hospital, flash his badge, and copy all your medical records if he feels like it, without violating HIPAA. Individual hospitals may have different policies, but nothing in HIPAA prevents that.

A badge does not equal a court order, court-ordered warrant or subvpoena. Hyperbole is not an effective argument tool, stop it.

about 10 months ago
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LexisNexis and Other Major Data Brokers Hacked By ID Theft Service

Loughla Re:Good? (99 comments)

Define "they" please.

about 10 months ago
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Un-Un-Pentium On Your Periodic Table of the Elements?

Loughla Re:so... (172 comments)

The issue is that it's not a governmental idea. It's an idea forwarded through the government by private industry and international interests like the IMF and World Bank. But yes, that is the exact outcome, I just argue that the idea is from the very beginning to lock wealth away with the wealthiest people, and our government and its representatives are either too inept to figure it out, or in collusion with the folks pushing this agenda.

about a year ago
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Un-Un-Pentium On Your Periodic Table of the Elements?

Loughla Re:so... (172 comments)

No, austerity means that we don't know how to fix the economy, but we believe that cutting governmental spending is the best way to do it. I've said it here before, I'll say it again. Big players got a taste of bigger money in the 70's, 80's and 90's in places like South Africa, South America, Poland, and Greece. They use a specific form of economic theory based on what is termed as "Shock Economics" spearheaded by many faculty and graduates of the University of Chicago School of Business.

These people got a taste of this big money in poor countries, and really, genuinely want to take a big-ass bite out of where the money is in the US and other 1st world countries: military, employee benefits and to a much, much smaller degree, education.

We've already seen the mass privatization of the military, through contracts and hired security forces. We're getting tastes of what's to come with all the talk of cutting government pensions (I pay into one, they're not as great as what mainstream media would have you believe - 50% of my salary average for the last 6 years I'm working, and the earliest I can retire without a penalty is 67). Private companies gamble with public pensions, lose the money, then lobby and purchase the media to make it seem as if it is the government's own fault.

Look for a wider and deeper call for privatization of education in the next 5 years. Look for harder pushes for vouchers and the complete dissolving of teacher's unions power.

Look for you to pay a private company directly to teach your kids using minimum-wage, unskilled workers as teachers reading from a prescribed electronic curriculum.

I say 20 years we have a completely private school system with an absolutely ridiculous gap between the have's and have-not's (more than we currently do).

about a year ago

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