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Comments

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Intel Drops Gamasutra Sponsorship Over Controversial Editorials

Macthorpe It's not about unjustly discrediting journalists. (724 comments)

I apologise, but Slashdot ate my HTML.

The top paragraph is a quote of the above AC, if you hadn't already worked it out from context.

about a month ago
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Intel Drops Gamasutra Sponsorship Over Controversial Editorials

Macthorpe It's not about unjustly discrediting journalists. (724 comments)

It's about calling out scam artists like Anita Sarkeesian and her bogus kickstarter. It's about calling out scumbags like Zoe Quinn and the gaming journalists with the undisclosed conflicts of interests that reported on her games. It's about calling out those who defend those other people by ignoring facts and manufacturing controversy, trying to discredit legitimate criticism as misogyny. People just like you, Timothy. This trash piece is unsurprising, though, since Slashdot has completely sold out to the SJW lie.

I find it interesting that this said it's not about journalism, it's about Zoe Quinn and Anita Sarkeesian. Then I look up the page and there's half a dozen people saying it's about journalistic integrity and Zoe Quinn is just pretending it's about her because she's an attention whore.

It's almost like, if you have a decentralised movement with no obvious leadership, that you don't have the ability to say what your movement is (or isn't) about any more. So when people say that Intel are caving to the kind of idiot who thinks the above isn't misogyny, you can't say that's not what's happening, because you don't own the movement and you can't point to anyone who does.

about a month ago
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UK Copyright Reforms Legalize Back-Ups, Protect Parody

Macthorpe Re:Also interesting for what they missed out (68 comments)

Is it though? I'm not a lawyer, but the BBC article suggests the opposite - that because it explicitly doesn't stop you from circumventing DRM, there will be even more pressure to create DRM that prevents format shifting to protect the bottom line.

Remember this is the UK, not the US - the DMCA doesn't exist here.

about a month ago
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European Commission Reopens Google Antitrust Investigation

Macthorpe Re:Because it sucks when you can't compete..... (96 comments)

Maps was an example rather than the only definitive place that it happens. I'm sorry if I didn't make that clear.

I don't have a strong opinion on SEO either way, but it's clear that companies believe it helps and are willing to invest in it, where Google doesn't need to as they control the results and the algorithm. Regardless if SEO was paid for or not, I can see why companies wouldn't consider the current situation ideal.

about 2 months ago
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European Commission Reopens Google Antitrust Investigation

Macthorpe Re:Because it sucks when you can't compete..... (96 comments)

I access from the UK so I can't tell if they do or don't now. I know they used to, but things have changed a bit since then.

We'll have to see the results of the new investigation, I imagine.

about 2 months ago
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European Commission Reopens Google Antitrust Investigation

Macthorpe Re:Again? (96 comments)

The trouble is in this instance, is that the people who have the decision making power (you, in this instance) aren't the same as the people who are being abused (the provider of the thing you're searching for). To say that it's okay because you have the power to change what you do, doesn't change the fact that you won't change because you're not the one being screwed.

about 2 months ago
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European Commission Reopens Google Antitrust Investigation

Macthorpe Re:Because it sucks when you can't compete..... (96 comments)

I don't really understand - it's googles product (phones, search, etc) why can't they do what they like with it? I'm sure people would go elsewhere if other products were any good?

Because it doesn't affect the person searching if Google's results don't show correctly the most popular results, it affects the company being pushed down the rankings - and the person searching is the person with decision-making power.

- Person A searches for "maps", either on the site, on the phone or on Chrome.
- Google promotes their own maps to the top regardless of whether they're the best choice, ahead of company B's solution, whether that solution is better or not.
- Person A sees that Google Maps is top and assumes they're better than company B, as you would when looking at a link in the #1 spot.

Company B's previous recourse was basically, to live with it - Google have control over the entire stack, top to bottom. Companies can't go elsewhere because Google index them, not the other way around, and Google keep how they calculate popularity hidden, so SEO for them is a combination of guesswork and research (costs which Google don't have to pay, incidentally). It's therefore up to the searchers to go elsewhere to get search results, but because Google are trusted to provide the correct answers, why would people do that? It's not the user's fault that Google dishonestly reports their results as the best even if others are better, it's Google's.

Anyway, in Europe it's against the law for Google to act in that way considering their position as provider of 66% of searches, so it was challenged. Google's solution in response to that legal action was to allow companies to pay Google to be promoted to top spot, but companies (naturally) thought that it was unfair that they would have to pay for equal consideration when Google do it to themselves for free. Now they have to come up with another idea.

about 2 months ago
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Michael Abrash Joins Oculus, Calls Facebook 'Final Piece of the Puzzle'

Macthorpe Re:Irrelevent (232 comments)

I agree and disagree - we should get VR moving, but there are other projects to put resources into that won't have Facebook's history of dumping on their partners.

about 7 months ago
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Michael Abrash Joins Oculus, Calls Facebook 'Final Piece of the Puzzle'

Macthorpe Re:Irrelevent (232 comments)

"Myopic geeks"? I can't help thinking I've been trolled.

Anyway, I read the blog post, as the AusGamers article was slashdotted before I got there. It mentioned nothing about what Facebook can bring to the Oculus Rift other than "resources". They also talk about long-term commitment, though I guess you would have to ask Zynga on how Facebook have delivered on their commitment to a stable gaming platform previously.

about 7 months ago
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Michael Abrash Joins Oculus, Calls Facebook 'Final Piece of the Puzzle'

Macthorpe Re:Irrelevent (232 comments)

Though it's plain you didn't read the blog post he wrote (he actually states specifically that VR is ideal for social, he just doesn't trust Facebook to push the platform for games development given their history of arbitrarily changing the playing field), I was using Notch as an example. Try having a browse around, and see if you can find a game developer who is genuinely excited about Facebook's involvement.

about 7 months ago
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Michael Abrash Joins Oculus, Calls Facebook 'Final Piece of the Puzzle'

Macthorpe Re:Irrelevent (232 comments)

And yes, I can't spell irrelevant. That isn't relevent to my point!

about 7 months ago
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Michael Abrash Joins Oculus, Calls Facebook 'Final Piece of the Puzzle'

Macthorpe Irrelevent (232 comments)

You can have all the engineering genius in the world, but when you have famous programmers abandoning the platform because of it's association with Facebook, what's the point?

If a tree falls in a forest with nobody to hear it...

about 7 months ago
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Intel's Knights Landing — 72 Cores, 3 Teraflops

Macthorpe Re: ipad (208 comments)

To be fair, Apple are very committed to branding.

about 10 months ago
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Microsoft To Can Skype API; Third-Party Products Will Not Work

Macthorpe Re:Embrace, Extend, Extinguish (330 comments)

How did you get modded up for this? The Guardian says nothing about anything that is mentioned in the OSnews article.

about a year ago
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California Sends a Cease and Desist Order To the Bitcoin Foundation

Macthorpe Re:Before they tackle BitCoin (396 comments)

Nothing, because they're licensed?

about a year ago
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California Sends a Cease and Desist Order To the Bitcoin Foundation

Macthorpe Re:Future regulation (396 comments)

No it's not. Only an idiot actually believes that. In order to be a real currency, you kinda have to have a lot of people use it to directly buy and sell things.

You can already buy and sell things with Bitcoin. Example: Bitlasers. So where is the line? How many items have to be sold before it becomes a currency? The logical answer would probably be "one".

about a year ago
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Amazon, Google and Apple Won't Need To Pay Tax, Despite Goverment Threats

Macthorpe Re:Not about apple (327 comments)

This article is about google and amazon in the UK. In an attempt at link baiting, there is a single line about apple in the US in the article so they would write Apple in the headline for clicks.

And slashdot fell for it - and so did I.

Actually the summary refers to the fact that Apple do this too.

Just because it's not specifically mentioned in the linked article, doesn't mean it's not happening.

about a year and a half ago
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Microsoft Reads Your Skype Chat Messages

Macthorpe Re:Interesting (275 comments)

Don't use a badly designed system?

about a year and a half ago
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Microsoft Reads Your Skype Chat Messages

Macthorpe Re:...Not that unexpected, and not that big a deal (275 comments)

I completely agree with you. Thousands on Slashdot wouldn't, because it's Microsoft and they're hunting desperately for something to blame them for.

about a year and a half ago

Submissions

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Apple's Samsung statement reprimanded by UK court of appeal

Macthorpe Macthorpe writes  |  about 2 years ago

Macthorpe (960048) writes "In the UK, Apple were previously ordered to add a statement to their website stating that Samsung did not copy their designs, following a previous case where this was ruled by the UK courts. However, today the same court revealed that Apple's statement is not good enough. From the article:

The acknowledgement put up last week, linked from the home page by a tiny link, was deemed to be "non-compliant" with the order that the court had made in October. The court has now ordered it to correct the statement – and the judges, Lord Justice Longmore, Lord Justice Kitchin and Sir Robin Jacob, indicated that they were not pleased with Apple's failure to put a simpler statement on the site.

It appears the main objection is the statement is on a separate page and only linked from the hompage — and that the statement is buried in marketing blurb, and also put next to references to a case Apple won."
Link to Original Source

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Al Gore's 'nine Inconvenient Untruths'

Macthorpe Macthorpe writes  |  about 7 years ago

Macthorpe writes "In a news story carried by Telegraph.co.uk, the High Court in the United Kingdom has ruled that Al Gore's famous feature-length film on global warming is a 'political film' and therefore can only be shown to school children with guidance notes to prevent political indoctrination. He reinforces this with 9 key points in the film where specific points of view are raised with little to no evidence to support them. From the article: "Judge Michael Burton ruled yesterday that errors had arisen "in the context of alarmism and exaggeration" in order to support Mr Gore's thesis on global warming [...] the judge ruled that the "apocalyptic vision" presented in the film was politically partisan and thus not an impartial scientific analysis of climate change."
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O2 lays groundwork for iPhone deal

Macthorpe Macthorpe writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Macthorpe writes "TimesOnline notes that O2 have laid the groundwork to announce that they have gained the rights to distribute the iPhone in the UK, with Peter Erskine (the O2 chief executive) defending Apple's revenue-sharing model. When asked about the revenue-sharing deals that Apple is expected to adopt with European mobile operators, Mr Erskine said: "If sharing revenue brings a bigger pie to the table, then we'll be happy to share that pie . . . The revenue-sharing model will play an increasingly important role in the future of converged communications.""
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iPhone Price Cut - Planned All Along?

Macthorpe Macthorpe writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Macthorpe writes "A blog entry by Robert Cringely relates a story from several years ago with some relevance to the recent iPhone price drop — surmising that Job's personality and other miscellaneous factors show that the iPhone pricing fiasco was planned from the start. From the article: "Had nobody complained, Apple would have left it at that. But Jobs expected complaints and had an answer waiting the $100 Apple store credit. This was no knee-jerk reaction, either [...] most importantly, those who bought their iPhones at an AT&T store will have to make what might be their first of many visits to an Apple Store. That is alone worth the $50 per customer this escapade will eventually cost Apple""
Link to Original Source
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Microsoft pledges conditional support for ODF

Macthorpe Macthorpe writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Macthorpe writes "BetaNews is reporting that Microsoft have announced in a letter that they will support ODF if it doesn't 'restrict choice among formats'. Citing their lack of opposition to the ratification of ODF as a standard, they go on to say: "ODF's design may make it attractive to those users that are interested in a particular level of functionality in their productivity suite or developers who want to work that format. Open XML may be more attractive to those who want richer functionality [...] This is not to say that one is better than the other — just that they meet different needs in the marketplace.""
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Microsoft Extends Xbox Warranty

Macthorpe Macthorpe writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Macthorpe writes "Accompanied by an open letter from the Corporate Vice President of Entertainment and Devices, Microsoft have extended the warranty on all Xbox consoles by 3 years to cover all of the so-called 'red ring' failures that have plagued the console since launch. Peter Moore elaborates:

We don't have 10 million broken Xbox 360s, but we haven't done a good job, in recent months in particular, of taking care of the people that have taken care of us[...] We've made a pretty bold step today — as you said, "ouch" — that has some pretty far reaching consequences financially, but as a company think is the right thing to do, and we're going to take care of you whether you bought one on launch day or yesterday and protect you against those problems that are indicated by the three red rings on the console.
"
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Macthorpe Macthorpe writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Macthorpe writes "The Register is reporting that a MacBook Pro has been sufficiently compromised to give a remote user complete control of the computer, with the flaw discovered as part of TippingPoint and CanSecWest's pledge to reward the first two such exploits found. The prize was shared by two people, with Shane Macauley walking away with the compromised MacBook for executing the exploit and Dino Dai Zovi taking the $10,000 bounty for finding the flaw and successfully exploiting it.

Dino Dai Zovi, a self-described 'Mac fanboy', explained: "It works. It is real. This is not something that I have made up... It seems that a lot of people harbour the belief that the Mac doesn't have these problems, but it does.""
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Macthorpe Macthorpe writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Macthorpe (960048) writes "ABC News is reporting that the EU have started an antitrust probe into the way that Apple sells music on iTunes. As you can only purchase from the store of the country where your credit or debit card is registered, the price differences and availability differences between iTunes stores for different EU countries constitute a violation of EU competition laws which forbid territorial sales restrictions."
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Macthorpe Macthorpe writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Macthorpe writes "DailyTech is reporting an error in Apple's UK website which gave customers a glimpse of the new Mac Pro — boasting Dual Quad-Core Intel Xeons. From the article: "The listing, which Apple promptly found and removed, revealed the quad-core Mac Pro in search results when users searched for 'Mac.' The quick description listed the Mac Pro as 'Now quad-core or 8-core processing power. Configure yours today.'""
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Macthorpe Macthorpe writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Macthorpe (960048) writes "Everyone, of course, having heard of Apple's lawsuit against Think Secret and numerous other minor actions against other blogs, TechCrunch have reported that Apple has been bullying bloggers yet again in the wake of their iPhone announcement. Apparently, some enterprising individuals have seen fit to create a Windows Mobile skin that directly imitates the iPhone layout, but in addition to pursuing the creators of the skin, Apple have been leaning on the bloggers to stop reporting on it."
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Macthorpe Macthorpe writes  |  about 8 years ago

Macthorpe (960048) writes "The BBC is reporting that the FairPlay copy protection software that prevents users playing iTunes downloads on other players has been 'cracked', and can now be removed with relative ease. From the article:

"Mr Johansen first distributed a program to bypass the Apple system, called QTFairUse, in 2003. Since then several versions of the program have been distributed to keep up to date with new versions of iTunes and FairPlay. These were distributed on the web for free but were difficult to use without technical know-how.

Now, Mr Johansen and DoubleTwist plan to commercialise the technology.""

Journals

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Installing Linux - My Experience

Macthorpe Macthorpe writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Well, I finally got around to trying Linux out on a spare laptop. You'll have to bear with me because I don't have the exact specs to hand, but it's a Toshiba Celeron D with 512MB of RAM and an ATI card (Mobility 7000 series?).

Distro #1: Mandriva One 2010

Mandriva failed to boot from the LiveCD. Great start everyone, round of applause. We'll gloss over that and press on.

Distro #2: Ubuntu 9.10

Attempt 1 involved the disc failing to burn 100% correctly and Ubuntu cycling from the loading screen, to the terminal, to a black screen with gobbledygook at the top, back to the loading screen again. I admit this part isn't Linux's fault, so I'll skip to attempt 2, which is when it starts to get a little more interesting.

Attempt 2 got me a bootable install of Ubuntu. The install time was pretty long but once done I started plugging away and seeing how easy it is.

My first impression was that Ubuntu is dog-fucking-slow on a machine with that spec. Considering I'd just done away with a more than passable install of XP I was unimpressed. From looks alone I wouldn't put anything between them (though it was nice to get away from Fisher-Price land) but, from the speed of it, I would have expected a user interface that operated more like Vista/7 than XP and it does not deliver that on any front. Window movement and alt-tabbing was jerky and tiresome, and I honestly could only give it half an hour before I started looking into other distros. In that time I failed utterly to get the chess program to render in OpenGL because there were two dependencies missing. Not sure why you'd distribute a program and then not bother actually installing everything it needs to run properly. Oh, and the laptop ran so hot it shut itself down about 20 minutes in, but that's probably the laptop.

Status: Abandoned for something faster.

Distro #3: Xubuntu 9.10

Having read some reviews praising XFCE's speed over Gnome and KDE, I decided that would be the route I went. Installed again and far more smoothly than Ubuntu install did, working first and picking up everything except the graphics card. Actually, that's worthy of a rant - when I did install the drivers, I started getting random black windows and notification boxes. This probably means they were right not to download them in the first place if it did work out my card, but the pissing thing didn't bother to tell me that, so I wasted half an hour installing and uninstalling the drivers for no reason, and it's hard to work Synaptic when the window keeps blacking out.

Magical.

Oh, and the other fun thing - apparently my dial-up modem isn't free enough, so it initially refused to install drivers for that too. I would like to point out that most users don't give two fucking hoots about ideology, They just want things to work. So, why not install the drivers anyway and then tell me afterwards that I'm a capitalist pig? Cheers.

Other than that, I won't say that I was blown away, or even enthused, but I was surprised at how far Linux has come. Installing programs is getting close to easy, though sometimes the descriptions are a little naff, and it took me a good chunk of an hour to work out how to copy graphics files for OpenTTD from one folder to another thanks to some permissions based shit on the destination folder that I couldn't change without dropping to the terminal. I eventually copied each file one by one in the terminal using sudo. I'm sure there's an easier way than that, but I got frustrated enough that I'd had it. Installing from Synaptic rather than hunting down an installer made a nice change but I can't help but feel that repositories aren't something that Linux can keep going if, in the long run, Linux becomes more popular.

XFCE is a good replacement for Gnome and doesn't suck up processor and graphics power like a hoover, though creating desktop shortcuts is a bit odd, and took a little bit of poking before I realised you can't just drag icons from one place to another.

I think I came away from the experience thinking that there were too many little things that Windows 7 makes really bloody easy that just take one step too many in Linux. Copying files, creating shortcuts, installing games, all worked but required just a little bit more fucking about than I'd like. That's not to say I'm wiping the laptop again, on the contrary - I'll be trying a few things out. I just don't see it as a full-time replacement.

Nethack rocks, though.

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Good job, Slashdot (Part 2!)

Macthorpe Macthorpe writes  |  more than 5 years ago

So, I wonder what they did this time to force Opera to only be able to open Slashdot as an RSS feed?

It was doing the same for IE8 for a little while - but that seems to be fixed. Jeez, it's like I can't read this site for 10 minutes nowadays without them trying to ruin the way I read it.

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Good job, Slashdot.

Macthorpe Macthorpe writes  |  about 6 years ago

Not only have you broken the front page to make the article titles unreadable on both Internet Explorer AND Opera, you've managed to make the page take 20 seconds to load on Firefox, so the only browser that you offer full compatibility for is now crippled. /golfclap

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Slashdot Myth #1: No, I'm Not Paid To Say This

Macthorpe Macthorpe writes  |  about 6 years ago

Figured it would be about time that I started using the journal area, so I thought I would start by taking my time to debunk some of the favoured Slashdot myths. So, without further ado, I present Myth #1:

No, I am not paid to defend Microsoft.

Really, this one shouldn't need any further explanation, but apparently this is really hard to grasp for people. If you think I'm defending Microsoft, it's because you or someone else has spouted one of the long list of false statements that people assume about them and I'm correcting you. I prefer truth over lies, and I have done the same for Linux and Apple.

I encourage anybody and everybody to fact-check what people say. Maybe a little knowledge will go a long way.

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