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Top Counter-Strike Players Embroiled In Hacking Scandal

Man Eating Duck Re:Shocking (224 comments)

It can be easily argued that CS requires a different style of play than CoD or BF. If it's not your thing then it's not your thing but to act like all shooters are the same game isn't insightful.

It can be easily argued that Canadian football requires a different style of play than American football. If it's not your thing then it's not your thing but to act like all football is the same game isn't insightful.

Actually to people who aren't all wrapped up in it it really IS the same game.

Yes, that's true, but the thing that makes GP a troll in this situation is that his lack of insight is completely uninteresting. His post is completely useless.

For the record, knitting is just banging two metal sticks together with some curled-up thread mashed in. I don't know anything about it, but knitting is stupid, and there can be no relevant difference between different kinds of knitting since "it takes 'true mastery' to even find any kind of difference". I include weaving, sewing and embroidery in the set {differend kinds of knitting}, by the way, since they all look the same to me.

about three weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: Handling Patented IP In a Job Interview?

Man Eating Duck Re:You guessed it: It depends (224 comments)

That makes it clearer for me. Thanks for taking the time :)

about 2 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Handling Patented IP In a Job Interview?

Man Eating Duck Re:You guessed it: It depends (224 comments)

I can't give anyone a non-GPL licence to this work, which is what they were demanding.

IANAL, but are you sure this is the case? I believe that in my country (Norway) at least, you're still the sole proprietor of your IP. You can sign an exclusivity contract, which of course puts restrictions on what you can do with your IP, but it can't put any liability on you for rights you've granted in the past (although an already contracted exclusivity can be transferred). Did they want to gain exclusive rights to code you'd already published under the GPL?

Under our laws, (again I believe that) that would make no sense. If there was a mechanism by which the license for a piece of code could be retroactively retracted most O project would have had huge problems. A license is different from a contract, and a license can't preclude other uses in the manner that a contract can. Even ignoring that, however, you would still be able to apply as many licenses a you want to your code. Does the GPL preclude that you grant, for instance, a BSD or Apache license for code which you wrote yourself?

Naturally I otherwise agree with your post :)

about 2 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Handling Patented IP In a Job Interview?

Man Eating Duck Re:"headofficed" - LOL (224 comments)

Verbing wierds language.

True, that. "wierds" is indeed a very weird word.

about 2 months ago
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2014 Nobel Prize In Physics Awarded To the Inventors of the Blue LED

Man Eating Duck Re:As well they should. (243 comments)

Yellow. The color of the sun. Obviously.

No, the light from the sun is white. The reason why it appears yellow in the sky is that a good portion of the blue-ish spectrum is spread in the atmosphere, making the sky blue, but hindering most of the blue light coming directly from the sun. The aggregated daylight during mid-day is indeed white, being the sum of direct sunlight plus the other parts of the spectrum reflected in the atmosphere from other directions. Sunlight's not a certain colour in the spectrum, more or less by necessity it's a mix of *all* visible colours.

The human eye is most sensitive to green light a lower intensities, and yellowish-green at higher intensities. This is due to the nature of the colour receptors in our eyes. Observe the visibility of equally powerful red, blue and green laser beams to verify this.

about 2 months ago
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Fuel Efficiency Numbers Overstate MPG More For Cars With Small Engines

Man Eating Duck Re:metric you insensitive clod! (403 comments)

Presumably Europe uses litres per 100 kilometres. At least that's what we use in Canada.

Yes, that's common. As a curiosity, in Norway we use liters/10 km. That's because 10km is the length of a Scandinavian mile, commonly used in colloquial speech in Norway.

Of course the l/100km unit is intuitively understandable for us, and it's also true that it makes more sense than mpg.

about 2 months ago
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Marriott Fined $600,000 For Jamming Guest Hotspots

Man Eating Duck Re:Inverse Wi-fi law (278 comments)

The really dumpy hotels have no choice. Their plant is run down, and they may be a no-name. Unless they offer free amenities, nobody in their right mind is going to stay at their place (assuming similar nightly rents) unless there's no choice.

I'd say that the really dumpy hotels are just badly managed. Yes, it costs a bit more to keep your facilities maintained and properly cleaned as opposed to let everything run down, but nothing like the 2-3x increase in price that you'll typically pay at a decent hotel compared to a dump. The hotel might need to have a bit more cost for cleaning and maintenance personnel, but the cost is seriously not that high, and it makes sense to aim for repeat business.

As an example: one of my nicest stays was five nights at a nine-room B&B in Edinborough, run by an elderly widow (not active anymore, she probably retired) . Although the building was old and creaky the staff (one girl) was very friendly and helpful, the rooms were spotlessly clean, they had a cosy library-ish common room with a fireplace constantly lit in the evening, and the landlady prepared a home-cooked breakfast every day (brought to you in your room if you were to badly hung-over from sampling lokal whisky the previous night, regardless of whether you really wanted it). The price was £23/night. They made a good bit of extra money by providing simple food and drinks in the evening, but that was also at a reasonable price.

The point is that as they managed to make money (they did, I asked) running a pleasant establishment at budget prices, there's no reason why any dump motel shouldn't be able to convert into a nice place to stay while keeping a similar price point. No, they might not be able to provide shirt press and shoe polishing included (although I'm quite confident that the landlady at the mentioned B&B would have done that at no extra cost), but they *can* keep the place clean, have helpful and service-minded staff, and generally be not-a-dump at a budget as long as they have proper management that cares.

PS my keyboard has a marginal 's' key, apologies if I missed any of them.

about 3 months ago
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Solid State Drives Break the 50 Cents Per GiB Barrier, OCZ ARC 100 Launched

Man Eating Duck Re:Why no 1 Tb version? (183 comments)

GiB....what does the i stand for?

It's short for Gibibyte.

about 4 months ago
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Solid State Drives Break the 50 Cents Per GiB Barrier, OCZ ARC 100 Launched

Man Eating Duck Re:flash/disk/tape ratios still stand (183 comments)

I've stopped attempting to keep my game collection on the an SSD.

Install all games to an HDD, and only keep the games you're actually playing on the SSD. Under Windows 7 I use a 120GB SSD for OS and the 2-3 games I'm currently playing by using Steam Mover. Since it's simply a GUI for a few cmd commands (mklink being the central one) it'll work for any directory you point it at, not just Steam games, and it's very robust.

If you're on Linux you're likely already familiar with some ways of doing this, if not I can give you a few pointers :)

about 4 months ago
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Cosmologists Show Negative Mass Could Exist In Our Universe

Man Eating Duck Re:We've observed and created antiparticles (214 comments)

By coincidence I was discussing Orwell with a friend last night. We decided that while 1984 was fine sociology and politics, the plot really didn't depend at all on the small amounts of technoogy he described. The surveillance could have been provided by spies as well as by TV screens and cameras. "SF" isn't a category we'd put Orwell into.

Um, science fiction doesn't have to be technology-focused, and most of the best stories aren't (with some exceptions where some exotic tech is a plot device). Sure, as many sci-fi stories occurs in the future there is an assumption that new technology have been marching on, but many interesting stories concern themselves with how humans react to the possibilities enabled by technology and new societal structures, rather than the technology itself. Nineteen Eigthy-four is specifically a future dystopia, but I'd certainly place it within the Sci-Fi genre.

On a side note, I've found that providing performance specifics about technology, specifically computers, are a sure sign of *bad* Sci-Fi. I read a novel written in 1992 set in 2007 where one particular computer had a CPU of 400 MHz and was equipped with "several hundred megabytes of memory". Bad Sci-Fi writers: restrict yourself to describing what amazing feats the wrist-computer is capable of, do not venture into providing explicit hardware specifications :)

about 5 months ago
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How Deep Does the Multiverse Go?

Man Eating Duck Re:Many worlds (202 comments)

Prove it.

I can't prove it as I don't know the math, but I've heard it explained this way:

Imagine a lot of parallel chess games between Magnus Carlsen and Vishy Anand. There might be all three outcomes and a lot of different games played, but not every possible game. The ones where one player loses in five moves, or one player overlooks a trivial mate-in-one, or both players fumble so much as to resemble novice players aren't likely to exist anywhere. The probabilities are simply too low in a game between two high-level chess players.

about 5 months ago
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Seattle Approves $15 Per Hour Minimum Wage

Man Eating Duck Re:Sweden (1040 comments)

The more socialist countries (Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, Germany) are doing far better than the more highly capitalist ones post crash.

Yup, Norwegian here. We weren't really affected adversely over here. I am not at all qualified to discern why, but the people who are generally claim it's because of our very solid societal structure and general lack of private interests' influence on our political system, which makes us less vulnerable to external market swings.

Norway as a nation is dependant on export industries (oil & gas, power, cargo shipping services, fish), and a few companies did suffer, but the regular Joes and Joettes didn't really feel any impact at all from the crash.

about 7 months ago
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I Want a Kindle Killer

Man Eating Duck Re:Missing the point (321 comments)

I use the Kindle app on my Android phone. I would never buy a standalone reader because I read when it's convenient. My phone is almost always with me and fits in my pocket.

I use the Kindle app on my Android phone. I would never buy a standalone reader because I read when it's convenient. My phone is almost always with me and fits in my pocket.

And I habitually bring my Kobo reader everywhere I go, and read every time I have a few minutes to kill. It fits nicely in a jacket/cargo pocket. I usually read several hours each day, and there are several reasons why I also bring it when leaving my apartment:

  • * When reading for hours at a time the better display eliminates eyestrain
  • * Battery concerns is not an issue
  • * The display is larger and fits more text, making for a more comfortable reading experience
  • * Fewer distractions than on a phone

If the phone is good enough for you when it comes to reading, that's great, and I would also like that to be the case for me. But for me it's not cutting it, so I end up choosing clothes based on whether they can store my (admittedly light and sleek, but bulkier than a phone) e-reader. I really, really hope that E-Ink aren't going away anytime soon.

about 7 months ago
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Free Software Foundation Condemns Mozilla's Move To Support DRM In Firefox

Man Eating Duck Re:Corporate directed not volunteer direct ... (403 comments)

Unless the locks on your doors are to lock people in, they aren't there because you assume all your houseguests are criminals, they are there because you assume some non-house guests are criminals. The locks don't stop the people you've already let in. And yeah, I do assume some of the people outside are criminals. Why wouldn't I?

The problem with this line of thought is that, to continue the analogy, a lot of your legitimate house guests will be kept out by the locks, while the criminals outside all know that you don't lock your cellar hatch and can help themselves.

Most DRM to date don't even slow down the pirates, as long as someone can see the content they can copy it. My experience is mostly from working at a publishing company, and the legitimate customers have a far easier time using a non-crippled file than a DRM'ed one. Basically, DRM is just a big fuck you to your legitimate customers, especially on downloaded files that are ostensibly usable anywhere like an ebook.

That said, I don't really understand why DRM-free streaming is so scary to content providers. Strong authentication would hinder casual link sharing, and the pirates would be able to make a copy of your stream even with any DRM you could imagine, as long as they could see the content. The only ones to suffer are legitimate customers that can't view the content because they don't have the right combination of equipment and software. The music business, and to a lesser degree the ebook industry, have found that in going DRM-free you can still rely on the majority of customers to be perfectly allright with paying for a good product, and they are happy that they can be sure of it being accessible. Currently the pirates are far superior when it comes to objective quality of product in the movie/TV-show department.

about 7 months ago
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New PostgreSQL Guns For NoSQL Market

Man Eating Duck Re:next for NoSQL (162 comments)

While your parent *was* a bit snarky in his reply, I can see only two reasons why you would try to finagle your NoSQL needs into a PostgreSQL server: you don't understand how to use a traditional RDBMS but would still like to advertise that you're using PostgreSQL instead of MongoDB (not likely for most devs), or the decision is made for you by management for the reasons you mention. If you need some NoSQL solution in a new project it's not very difficult to create an instance, and the infrastructure for the future production DB of your project should be a consideration based on your needs, not what is incidentally already there (hey, it's a DB, it should do the job, right?). Right tool for the job.

For the record I am very used to working with traditional SQL databases, and I particularly like PostgreSQL. Still I know there are lots of use cases for the various NoSQL DBs. They are different beasts, some of which are tailored for very specific applications. I haven't scrutinised the new features of PostgreSQL, but if a NoSQL db were a better fit for the project I would need strong reasons not to go for it.

*Analogy warning* If you have to change a large amount of Torx screws, you could probably accomplish it with a flat blade screwdriver of an approximate size if that's what you have in your shed, but it might save you a lot of destroyed screws to buy a Torx driver instead.

about 7 months ago
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New PostgreSQL Guns For NoSQL Market

Man Eating Duck Re:next for NoSQL (162 comments)

Yeah, it's irritating, but should not be an insurmountable obstacle for migrating schema+data. I have done this thrice for a database consisting of 40 tables and about 2.7 million rows total (DB2 -> PostgreSQL 7.something, DB2 -> SQL Server 2005, and SQL-Server -> PostgreSQL 9.1). Yes, I know that those numbers are small-ish, but the data contained a lot of user input and included every quirk and special character under the sun :)

This database was storage for a Java application using Hibernate, which likely evaded some obstacles (see below). The procedure took a couple of days in each case: export schema, change a few data types in the schema (bool/int, date/datetime and so on), after which the inserts work if you pay attention to string escapes, encoding, and so on. I scripted the conversion in each case, so that every test iteration started from a fresh dump. I tested it by exporting all data from both DBs to native language data types and diffing the results.

Of course you can get in a lot of trouble if your client software is not using abstraction for db access, I suppose that some software contains quite a lot of literal SQL in the source, and SQL syntax differs in amusing ways. In some causes I can see no other reason for it than "because fuck you, that's why". Also, if your client software relies on non-standard features of a specific RDBMS you might have to rewrite to account for that.

So yes, I would very much like for all vendors to have a standard-compliant default mode, from which exported data would seamlessly import into other RDBMS's (re. sig, how do you write that correctly?). Sadly, most vendors (apart from OSS alternatives like PostgreSQL which should bend over backwards to make migration easier) have no interest in making it easier to switch to another RDBMS, so this will never happen.

Granted, I was part of the team developing said application, and DB portability was something of a pet peeve of mine, for which I was very thankful during the migrations. Due to that we had few DB-related issues during those migrations. I'm not even a DB-admin by trade, so most real DB-admins should have no problems doing what I did.

about 7 months ago
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Grading Software Fooled By Nonsense Essay Generator

Man Eating Duck Re:most schools ignore sat essay (187 comments)

[...] My vocabulary has always been tested to be far above my level. Granted if you were to just present me the words with semi-random definitions I would probably be screwed. But if you see how the word is used in a sentence like most test present it to you, it is fairly easy to determine the meaning of a word from just it's grammar, context and usage. [...]

I wouldn't say that a particular word is part of your vocabulary if you can only guess its meaning from context. That's why good vocabulary tests only show you the word. According to this test my English vocabulary is estimated to be about 35000 words, probably because I have read *a lot* of English (it isn't my native language). This test only show you the words, and you have to be honest, so cheating is easy... however, I didn't.

There is also the difference between your active vocabulary (words that you would actually be able to recall and use in a sentence), and passive vocabulary (words that you know the meaning of if you see it standing alone). If you can only guess the meaning of a word from its context, it's not part of your vocabulary at all, and a test which helps you to the extent of showing it in a sentence is close to useless.

about 8 months ago
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DARPA Develops Stealth Motorcycle For US Special Forces

Man Eating Duck Re:Hybrids, diesel and Prius (93 comments)

A ship engine isn't a fixed RPM diesel generator, it's a variable RPM diesel engine.

I agree with the rest of your post, but ship's diesel motors used on transport ships are about as efficient as you can make an engine run. For the vast majority of their time, they run at the ideal fuel/output ratio you can get. This is not because of environmental concerns, but because it saves fuel (and money) to the companies running the ships. True, the engines are larger, but you could do worse than looking at what they do to find the most efficient ways to run a diesel engine :)

about 8 months ago
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Experts Say Hitching a Ride In an Airliner's Wheel Well Is Not a Good Idea

Man Eating Duck Re:What I want to know is ... (239 comments)

Yes. From the airport. Which is "in on it".

Yup, that racket annoys me to the point where I try not to buy anything neither at the airport nor on the plane. Except for that I generally don't care about food and drink prices while travelling. At my local airport one company has an agreement about providing all food and pub services (apart from a couple of franchise stores) at the airport, and the prices are absolutely ridiculous.

I've noted a few exceptions, though. Both Munich airport and Las Palmas had pleasant outdoor cafés with food and drinks, with prices a bit cheaper than typical main street tourist places in those respective cities. Not your local corner joint, but better than expectations for airports.

Departing from Stansted, London last week, I had the cheapest pint of beer of the whole trip. £3.25 for a very nice stout (Saddle Black). Granted, we stayed in central London, where prices are high, and that particular pint was a promotion, but it was still actually good value :)

about 8 months ago
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Lytro Illum Light-Field Camera Lets You Refocus Pictures Later

Man Eating Duck Re:Still hoping they make a movie camera (129 comments)

No, it's where you're looking. Why can't you be happy looking where everybody else is looking?

The tech isn't broken just because of a small minority of 'special' people like you don't know how to take in a scene. Why don't you stop being special and just watch it the way everybody else does?

I, too, find this very irksome in some 3D movies. Avatar was pretty good in that respect, some of the Harry Potter movies were really, really bad. The thing is that my eyes will wander over the scene, and it is tiresome when my eyes instinctively try to focus on those out-of-focus areas. It does not happen in 2D, but 3D fools my brain into believing that focusing is possible. And yes, this is an artistic decision on the director's part which doesn't work for me at all, as it does *not* translate from the 2D equivalent.

I haven't gamed much in 3D, but I found it a very pleasant experience when I tried it in a store (I think the game was Crysis 2). I only played for a few minutes, it might have been tiring after a longer period of time, but I'm pretty sure that what made it so *good* during gameplay compared to watching a 3D movie was that the whole scene was in focus.

about 8 months ago

Submissions

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Ubisoft has Windows-style hardware-based activatio

Man Eating Duck Man Eating Duck writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Man Eating Duck (534479) writes "Guru3D describes how the activation system in Anno 2070 also tracks hardware changes: 'So yesterday I started working on a performance review. We know (well at least we figured we knew), that the game key can be used on three systems. That's fair, the first activation is used on my personal game rig. The second we installed on the AMD Radeon graphics test PC and the 3rd on our NVIDIA graphics test PC. [...] For the NVIDIA setup I take out the GTX 580, and insert a GTX 590. When I now startup the game 'BAM', again an activation is required. Once again I fill out the key and now Ubisoft is thanking me with the message that I ran out of activations.

Guru3D subsequently discovered that Ubisoft was less than helpful: 'Sorry to disappoint you — the game is indeed restricted to 3 hardware changes and there simply is no way to bypass that.' I, and many with me, will never buy games with such a draconian DRM scheme, as it's very likely that I'll swap out enough components to run into this issue. Even the Steam version includes this nice "feature". It's probably a good idea to let Ubisoft know why we'll pass on this title."

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