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AT&T Says 10Mbps Is Too Fast For "Broadband," 4Mbps Is Enough

Mascot Re:For the naysayers (532 comments)

I suspect you are being willfully obtuse, but in case you're not: dial-up and ISDN have always referred to specific technology. Broadband has meant "not dial-up" and "fast".

For that matter, dial-up has never meant high speed unless including the actual speed.

about two weeks ago
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AT&T Says 10Mbps Is Too Fast For "Broadband," 4Mbps Is Enough

Mascot Re:For the naysayers (532 comments)

And we're full circle. Returning to my original post, what was considered fast way back when, is no longer so today. For the term broadband to retain its meaning of "fast Internet", it needs to refer to speeds that can be considered fairly snappy in today's reality, otherwise you might as well just call it "Internet connection". Which brings me back to my proposal of 10Mbit as a reasonable minimum. Rewind 10 years, and I would've been fine with 4Mbit.

about two weeks ago
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AT&T Says 10Mbps Is Too Fast For "Broadband," 4Mbps Is Enough

Mascot Re:For the naysayers (532 comments)

That may be the technical definition, but the colloquial use as pertaining to Internet access is something else. From Wikipedia: "Finally, the term became popularized through the 1990s as a marketing term for Internet access that was faster than dialup access, the original Internet access technology, which was limited to 56 kbit/s. This meaning is only distantly related to its original technical meaning."

about two weeks ago
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AT&T Says 10Mbps Is Too Fast For "Broadband," 4Mbps Is Enough

Mascot Re:For the naysayers (532 comments)

Dial-up, like broadband, is a term that encompasses various speeds. Just like you wouldn't get away with claiming your 9.6K ISP was "blazingly fast" when everybody else had long since upgraded to 14.4K, you shouldn't get away with using "broadband" as a term unless "broad" really is an applicable adjective. It has been a number of years since 4Mbps qualified.

about two weeks ago
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AT&T Says 10Mbps Is Too Fast For "Broadband," 4Mbps Is Enough

Mascot Re:For the naysayers (532 comments)

As far as I can recall, Netflix's HD (not 4K) tops out at about 6Mbps. It could be as simple as Netflix deciding that your connection can't handle the higher quality stream and falling back to 2.5Mbps (or your provider throttling Netflix, for that matter). Which is fine for a tablet, but would likely be fairly noticeable on a decently sized TV.

I can but repeat myself. Just because it's an Internet connection that isn't totally useless, does not make it qualify to be described as "broadband" in my mind. For a provider to claim they offer broadband, they should offer 10Mbps as a minimum. If they don't, they're just offering "Internet". This is, of course, entirely my opinion, since there's no firm definition of the term broadband.

about two weeks ago
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AT&T Says 10Mbps Is Too Fast For "Broadband," 4Mbps Is Enough

Mascot Re:For the naysayers (532 comments)

"I bring my Chromecast and stream a Blu-ray image from my media center at home"

And technically, that's not legal.

To which technicality in Norwegian law are you referring? Because I'd be willing to bet a fair bit of cash on you being dead wrong. I can even make a copy, as long as the person I'm giving it to is a friend or family member.

about two weeks ago
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AT&T Says 10Mbps Is Too Fast For "Broadband," 4Mbps Is Enough

Mascot Re:For the naysayers (532 comments)

I max out my 75Mbps on a daily basis. I could, of course, live with a bit less, but significantly less and I'd need to find other solutions to some usage areas. For example, I upload full hard drive images to online storage as backups. It takes a good while already at 75Mbps. If I visit someone to watch a movie, I don't bring a selection of Blu-ray discs, I bring my Chromecast and stream a Blu-ray image from my media center at home. That's typically 30-40Mbps. I tried to upgrade my subscription, but it turns out I'll need to wait until my provider upgrades the local switch to gigabit.

I'm not saying my usage is representative of the average home user. But I would still say that 10Mbps is the absolute minimum to qualify as "broadband" today. Broadband didn't use to mean "an Internet connection", but rather "really fast Internet connection". At 10Mbps you can barely stream HD at reasonable quality, something I would say should be considered a normal use case today.

about two weeks ago
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Babylon 5 May Finally Get a Big-Screen Debut

Mascot Re: And so it begins... (252 comments)

Yeah, I have the same issue. It takes me a while to get into it every time. I also struggle for the first few episodes of season 5. But with a few episodes under my belt, it's like a snowball gaining momentum.

about a month and a half ago
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Babylon 5 May Finally Get a Big-Screen Debut

Mascot Re: And so it begins... (252 comments)

I'm sorry, as much as I loved Babylon 5, it simply doesn't stand the test of time when you watch it in your 30s rather than as a teenager.

I watched it for the first time in my 30s and still found it absolutely brilliant. Just sayin'.

about a month and a half ago
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At my current workplace, I've outlasted ...

Mascot No one has outlasted anybody (177 comments)

At my current place of employment, no one has ever quit or been fired. Every hire is still here.

about 8 months ago
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Do You Need Headphones While Working?

Mascot Re:Headphones (262 comments)

In an office (with actual doors), perhaps, but an open floor plan solution is to save money, not to increase collaboration. All research articles I have noticed over the years conclude that productivity plummets in an open floor plan solution. If there is a job description it is suited for, I have yet to see it mentioned. The upsides of collaboration and camaraderie is obliterated by noise levels and disruptions.

Personally, I stay home and keep email closed and my phone off if I have something I actually need to get done in a timely fashion. It's the only way to get actual work done. At the office I have the best noise cancelling headphones money can buy (well, according to the reviews).

about a year ago
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Ask Slashdot: When Is It OK To Not Give Notice?

Mascot Try three months (892 comments)

Where I live, three months is the norm. The law stipulates from one to three months, depending on how many years you've been working at the same place, but I have yet to work anywhere that operates with anything but three months notice after the six month trial period.

about a year ago
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Apple Makes Two-Factor Authentication Available For Apple IDs

Mascot Re:Stop asking for my password all the time (63 comments)

To be honest, if my password is a 30 character one that takes me several minutes to pull up on my computer's password safe and type in using a phone's keyboard, it doesn't take very often for that password to be dumbed down to something more convenient.

The problem is that password is not protecting the phone, but the account, accessible from anywhere. Dumbing down the password is a bad solution. I'd be equally happy with a middle ground, like a PIN code to purchase as opposed to the full password. Which, incidentally, is exactly how people would avoid someone picking up their phone and "prank buying" in the first place (current security drama with regards to the lock screen notwithstanding).

Having said that, my Android phone has not asked me for my password since I bought it, and I am not bankrupt yet, nor can I remember seeing articles about people having issues.

about a year and a half ago
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Apple Makes Two-Factor Authentication Available For Apple IDs

Mascot Re:Stop asking for my password all the time (63 comments)

I said *I* don't want. I'm not trying to impose my choice upon others. I'd much prefer Apple added a configurable option to cater both for people that hand their gear to kids, or people they don't know, or habitually misplace hundreds of dollars worth of kit, as well as for people like me that do not.

about a year ago
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Apple Makes Two-Factor Authentication Available For Apple IDs

Mascot Re:Stop asking for my password all the time (63 comments)

As I said, it has gotten better. But it's not that long since it asked for a password simply to update an already installed application.

And, no, I don't want it to ask me for my password when I buy something on a device I have previously authenticated on. Tell me the price and ask for confirmation, yes, but ask me for password, no.

about a year and a half ago
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Apple Makes Two-Factor Authentication Available For Apple IDs

Mascot Re:Stop asking for my password all the time (63 comments)

Indeed, the last time I can remember having to enter my Google password for my Android phone, was when I bought it. And that's why it's a randomly generated password of some length (and two-factor protected). My AppleID is.... not.

Apple could have solved this in so many ways that are more convenient. Like, god forbid, letting the user decide between several options. That way I could get one I would be happy with (a confirmation dialog to avoid accidental clicks), and parents could get one they are happy with (password required when doing something that costs money). Apple really does not like multiple choices though, so it is what it is.

about a year and a half ago
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Apple Makes Two-Factor Authentication Available For Apple IDs

Mascot Stop asking for my password all the time (63 comments)

If I didn't have to type my password all the freakin' time, I might generate an actually secure one. Granted, iOS has gotten somewhat better with the latest updates- at least it doesn't ask me for every app update anymore. But, still...

about a year and a half ago
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What Are the Unwritten Rules of Deleting Code?

Mascot Remove clutter, leave information (384 comments)

In the largest company I've worked for, the written rule was to explain and comment (using a specific syntax), never delete. The unwritten/save-our-sanity rule was to delete if the comments began affecting the readability of the code.

When working on code with hundreds of other developers, code that's commented out and explained/linked to a case id, can save a _lot_ of time. Say a piece of code solved an issue, but in turn created a performance issue. This did not become apparent until the code went live. The developer tasked with figuring it out isolates the affected flow and "... oh... someone added that credit check here a few weeks ago, I'll check that out first." That saves a lot of time compared to identifying dozens of involved files, then only diffing the specific methods involved in the particular flow.

about a year and a half ago
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NZBMatrix Closes Their Website

Mascot Re:Need to decentralize (144 comments)

They're going after the Usenet providers as well, via automated DMCA takedown requests. The providers have no choice but to comply (and to keep up, also automating the process), which means content is effectively gone within hours of being uploaded.

The irony when it comes to TV shows/movies is the same as it used to be with the music industry: the stuff being downloaded is largely not available to buy online legally. I wish they would put their efforts into making this content available for purchase instead of wasting their time trying to stem the flood of copyright infringement.

about 2 years ago
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No More "Asperger's Syndrome"

Mascot Re:About time (602 comments)

In defense of the diagnosis: when the inability to process social cues impairs your ability to function in society, it is a disability. One can argue that society has its head up its collective arses for being so rigid there's virtually one right way, and one only, to respond to any given social situation. But those are the rules we have to live by for the foreseeable future.

about 2 years ago

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