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Comments

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SimCity Mac Launch Facing More Problems

Mattcelt Re:Same shit, different day (177 comments)

They didn't make this originally, either. SimCity was a Maxis game until EA bought them.

about 8 months ago
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Lake Vostok Found Teeming With Life

Mattcelt Re:bigger fish (62 comments)

I'd be just as interested to find the men down there they've been eating...

about 9 months ago
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Bolivian President's Plane 'Rerouted Over Snowden Suspicions'

Mattcelt Re:God it feels good to be an American!!!!!!! (621 comments)

I thought it was an ice pick?

"A mountain climber's axe! It's a mountain climber's axe! Can't I get that through your skull??"

about 9 months ago
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Google Maps Updated With Skyfall Island Japan Terrain

Mattcelt Re: Leave no trace (107 comments)

Good luck destroying all life. The earth has tried to do that several times in the past (K-T Event, anyone?) and utterly failed. When all it takes is a single asexual bacterium to restart the entire biome, it becomes practically impossible to destroy all life.

about 10 months ago
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To Hack Back Or Not To Hack Back?

Mattcelt Re:Well, sure (183 comments)

And two Wrights make an airplane.

about 10 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: What To Do When Another Dev Steals Your Work and Adds Their Name?

Mattcelt Re:Infidel defilers. (480 comments)

Lesbian Nazi hookers, abducted by UFOs and forced on weight-loss programs. On the next Town Talk!

about 10 months ago
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Scientists Explain Why Chairman of House Committee On Science Is Wrong

Mattcelt Re:Rich people deserve safe beachfront homes (476 comments)

What on Earth makes you think the NYT or CNN is more credible a source than FOX?

Show me a news source that isn't catering to ratings (i.e., money), and I'll show you one worth listening to. Until then, they're all suspect, and all they spew is bollocks.

about 10 months ago
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Footage Reveals Drone Aircraft Nearly Downed Passenger Plane in 2004

Mattcelt Re:Is it Real? (206 comments)

No, just blown away.

about 10 months ago
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Why We'll Never Meet Aliens

Mattcelt Re:Why is this here? (629 comments)

Sorry to be pedantic, but unless I missed it, you pointed out only potentially factual errors in the original, not any logical fallacies. So while it certainly raises some questions, it does not "beg" any in your example. (Though I think a thorough analysis of TFA's original premise could find some petitio principii in the author's logic.)

Here is a good explanation of why that is so.

about a year ago
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Huge Explosion at Texas Fertilizer Plant

Mattcelt Re:20 years passed (422 comments)

In English, an adverb is a word that modifies a verb or adjective.

As an example of modifying an adjective: "He was very tired."
He - noun (subject)
was - verb
very - adverb (modifying 'tired')
tired - adjective (specifically a predicate adjective

As an example of modifying a verb: "Danielle quickly ran to the corner."
Danielle - noun (subject)
quickly - adverb (modifying 'ran')
to - preposition
the - definite article
corner - noun (the object of the preposition in this case)

So to borrow from your first instance: "His murders were clearly terrorism."
His - possessive pronoun
murders - noun (subject)
were - verb
clearly - adverb (modifying 'were')
terrorism - predicate nominative, a special use case for nouns (not an adverb)

The easiest way to identify an adverb is to ask what the word modifies. If it modifies a noun (a blue sweater, where blue is describing the sweater), it's an adjective. If it modifies an adjective (a very blue sweater) or a verb (a sweater permanently dyed blue), it's an adverb. (One can often identify verb-modifying adverbs by looking for the suffix -ly: quick -> quickly, intelligent -> intelligently.) Though the constructions of the latter sentences are more complex, none of those examples you cite are actually adverbs: they are all adjectives in some form. Terror, terrorist, and terrorism are all nouns. There is actually no adverbal form of terrorism that I'm aware of. The closest I can think of is "terrifyingly".

about a year ago
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Galaxy S 4 Dominates In Early Benchmark Testing

Mattcelt Re:But not the Z10? (276 comments)

This raises an interesting question: is there a suitable replacement for blackberry for the enterprise yet? None of the phones systems/solution I've seen have anything resembling the BES (Blackberry Enterprise Server) and encryption for email, etc. What will be the successor to BB in the enterprise?

1 year,28 days
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Is It Time To Enforce a Gamers' Bill of Rights?

Mattcelt Re:Better off enforcing an EA boycott (469 comments)

So very true. I thank the heavens every day for the crack scene - I have original games from the mid-1980s which would be unplayable if it weren't for THG, RAZOR 1911, and others like them. I probably spend at least $100 on games per month, but I won't put my money into any title until a crack is available. EA, Blizzard, and other companies have lost thousands - perhaps even tens of thousands - of dollars of my money because of their godawful DRM, and the problem is only getting worse. Starcraft II, Diablo 3, and now SimCity, for instance - all are games I would have loved to play, but only when they're unencumbered.

And don't get me started on steam or battle.net, either. I don't rent games!

about a year ago
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Canadian Newspaper Charging $150 License Fee To Publish Excerpts

Mattcelt Re:Conrad Black needs money, it seems (217 comments)

I use the Developer Tools add-on for Firefox. Under "miscellaneous", there's a "linearize page" option. Works wonders for most sites, especially places like flickr.

about a year ago
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Ask Slashdot: How To Convince a Company Their Subscriber List Is Compromised?

Mattcelt Re:Is it fixed? (247 comments)

I was able to verify that mine was a unique case, and that only email addresses were compromised for everyone else.

about a year ago
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Ask Slashdot: How To Convince a Company Their Subscriber List Is Compromised?

Mattcelt Re:Is it fixed? (247 comments)

Well it seems I may have spoken too soon - they called me today. They explained what happened (it was a vendor who leaked) and gave me a very thorough recounting of what happened. Their timing could have been better, but they did follow through. The InfoSec person I talked to was very knowledgeable, friendly, and professional. While I have some spam I'll have to deal with, they're trying hard to make things right. Overall, I'm pretty impressed.

about a year ago
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Ask Slashdot: How To Convince a Company Their Subscriber List Is Compromised?

Mattcelt Re:Is it fixed? (247 comments)

Filed, thanks very much for the link.

It's funny (in a sad way) - three or four of the initial questions in the report asked if I had contacted a credit reporting agency to let them know my data had been compromised. At the top of every list was Equifax.

And the company who was breached? The ones who leaked my SSN?

Equifax.

about a year ago
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Ask Slashdot: How To Convince a Company Their Subscriber List Is Compromised?

Mattcelt Re:Is it fixed? (247 comments)

I spoke with one of their InfoSec guys on the phone. They have my phone number, and they know that I know that my personal information was compromised. There's no excuse for not keeping me apprised, at the very least.

about a year ago
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Ask Slashdot: How To Convince a Company Their Subscriber List Is Compromised?

Mattcelt Re:Is it fixed? (247 comments)

I had exactly the same issue as the OP this past week, but with a Fortune 1000 company whose business model revolves around collecting and selling information about people.

I contacted their information security department, and sent them the emails and headers at their request. I haven't heard from them since.

The problem is that not only did I get emails to an address that only that company has; my social security number was also in the emails. So whoever got the emails got much more personal information as well. It's clearly a case where the company should be disclosing that they had a breach. If they don't, I'm going public with what I've got.

These companies have a responsibility to the people whose information they hold.

about a year ago
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Got a Cell Phone Booster? FCC Says You Have To Turn It Off

Mattcelt Re:makes some sense (245 comments)

The FCC FAQ mentions only that if you are told by a wireless carrier or the FCC that your device is interfering with a mobile network, you must turn it off. It says nothing about doing so preemptively.

about a year ago

Submissions

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The sorry state of copying in OS design

Mattcelt Mattcelt writes  |  about 3 years ago

Mattcelt (454751) writes "Mac OSX just turned 10. Windows 3.0 is old enough to buy its own drinks. MS-DOS is a venerable 30 years old. And UNIX, that lovely old bag, is of an age equivalent to the Answer to the Question of Life, the Universe, and Everything. These are well-established, mature operating systems, full of amazing advanced features and wonderful embellishments.

So can someone please tell me why the ‘copy’ function in ALL of these OSs hasn’t made any significant improvements in, well, EVER?? Why does the same horribly inefficient, serial, unresponsive, fault-intolerant file copying mechanism that was present in UNIX in the early 1970s persist today? (And why can’t I find a single article on the Internet that asks this question? I can’t believe I’m the only one who has noticed that we’re (metaphorically) racing our flying cars through the sky with hamsters under the hood. . .)

I am not, and never will be, a programmer. So I implore anyone who reads this to think about it, and if you have any programming skills, make a NEW copy function that actually incorporates some of the revolutionary ideas we’ve come to expect even from lowly FTP applications in the past 40 years! If you need ideas about what features to include, here are a few:

-queuing: Why does the OS try to start each copying operation on top of the ones already present, even when it cuts performance for both by 60% or more? If I want to ask the OS to copy a set of files when another copy is already in progress to/from the same source and/or destination, it should at the very least ask me if I’d like the copy to start after the current one has finished.

-report on errors: I just love it when I have a batch of hundreds of files which need to be copied or moved to a new location, and it fails about 80% of the way through Instead of a “failed while copying file x” or worse, just a cryptic error code, why can’t the OS keep track of which files WERE successfully copied, and tell me in a detailed report WHY it failed on that file?

-fault-tolerance: Let’s take the last point a step further. If I have a batch of files to copy and it fails on ONE, is it too much to ask to have the copy operation complete ALL of the rest, instead of allowing the error to interrupt the whole process? Inform me of the error, but don’t just stop — the OS should finish as much of what I’ve asked it to do as it can, without any further input from me.

-resume: If I need to interrupt a large copy operation to take care of something else, why can’t I resume it later? A batch copy is nothing more than a series of tasks, yet ALL modern OSs treat it as if it were a single task with a binary outcome. Give the user some control and knowledge about the parts of the process instead of just a window into an FMbox that way it is now.

-regexp: Since we’re already dreaming, why not add some advanced functionality that would be REALLY useful? How many of you UNIX admins have written a regular expression utility to handle file copies already? (I bet it’s most of you.) And how did you do it? By getting a file list from some other output, parsing the filenames you want from it, and passing those file names to the copy operation. What a waste!! Why isn’t there a filter built in to the copy function itself? And wouldn’t it be nice to have a quick-and-dirty GUI interface for it when you don’t want to interrupt what you’re doing in the command shell?

-direct-remote copying: Imagine you’re using a remote terminal to access server A. And for some reason, you can’t xterm or remote control servers B and C, but you need to copy a 500GB virtual disk from B to C. (I’m using a real-world example here, drawn from experience). So you map their drives onto server A, and begin the copy operation. What happens? In Windows, the file(s) is/are copied from server B to server A, then from server A to server C. Instead of 500 gigabytes being passed over the network, it’s a TERABYTE. Taking protocol and routing overhead into account, it ends up being more than twice the bandwidth than is necessary. So why not just have the ability to affect the copy directly from B to C instead of incurring all the extra? I know this is the most complex feature of these to implement, but it would be awfully useful. . .

So what do you say? In these days of 3D home televisions, floor-sweeping robots, and electric cars, can we please put the 1970s mimeographs away and get ourselves a nice new, 2011-ready ‘copy’ program?"
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Mattcelt Mattcelt writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Mattcelt writes "I've had it with Internet Explorer-only sites. (And to be fair, I've even had it with "IE- and Netscape-only" sites too.) In my company (an international firm with 5000+ users), the rollout of IE7 is being delayed because so many of our "IE-only" internal sites won't even work with the new version. It seems to me that if that much re-coding has to be done anyway, why not change the corporate standard to embrace Firefox, Opera, Safari, and, oh, maybe the W3C guidelines? I am in a position to make the suggestion on a wide-enough scale to have a reasonable chance of success, if I can make a strong enough case. So my question to the Slashdot crowd is this: How do I, with facts and figures, make the strongest case to move away from IE as the default and get our developers to adopt a more open strategy?"

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