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My Automobile Gets __ MPG

MikTheUser Re:What automobile ? (1141 comments)

You, Sir, seem to be unaware of The Zombie Survival Guide (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zombie_Survival_Guide). It explains, plainly and vividly, why in a real zombie outbreak, the person laughing would be the one escaping on his bicycle in between the cars on a jammed and/or blocked freeway, while you in your useless car would either die of dehydration or be eaten on the spot.

more than 4 years ago
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First Creation of Anti-Strange Hypernuclei

MikTheUser Re:Bottom/Anti-Bottom Hypernuclei? (179 comments)

It's not an ignorant question at all. I think the answer would indeed be that bottom quarks are so heavy they decay too quickly for us to observe them in bound states like hypernuclei.

The question is basically the same as - you can read up on that one quite well on Wikipedia - "Why do we observe charm quarks and bottom quarks in bound states such as the J/Psi or Bottomonium, but no Topponium?"

more than 4 years ago
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First Creation of Anti-Strange Hypernuclei

MikTheUser Re:Has anyone noticed? (179 comments)

It's simple, really: We know about most of the matter that is common around here, which is matter that exists under the conditions that we have here.

Now, when we go ahead and try to create hitherto unknown forms of matter, we create extreme conditions not normally encountered around us. A way to do this that we understand fairly well is to create extreme pressures and extreme temperatures, as in RHIC collisions.

As it happens, those are the conditions inside collapsed stars, so when we discover new forms of matter this way, it's likely that it exist there, as well.

Your friendly neighborhood hopefully-soon-to-be astrophysicist

more than 4 years ago
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First Creation of Anti-Strange Hypernuclei

MikTheUser Re:Negatively strange anti-hypernucleus? (179 comments)

He shits you not!

Shed and outhouse are uncommon these days, but only a year back, I calculated stuff in femtobarns in my exam of Particle Physics.

more than 4 years ago
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First Creation of Anti-Strange Hypernuclei

MikTheUser Re:"Anti-strange"? (179 comments)

Wouldn't an Anti-Strange Hypernuclei just be a Normal Hypernuclei?

No.

"Strange", in this context, means "having the attribute of positive strangeness", which means that these hypernuclei are composed of at least one nucleon which, in turn, is composed of at least one strange quark (as opoosed to "ordinary" up and down quarks).

Thus, "anti-strange" means "having the attribute of negative strangeness", which stands for all the ablove blah-blah, but with "strange anti-quark" inserted instead of "strange quark".

more than 4 years ago
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First Creation of Anti-Strange Hypernuclei

MikTheUser Misleading summary (179 comments)

Hypernuclei with negative strangeness haven't been "created for the first time". They've been produced in RHIC collisions for as long as they've been running (with sufficient energy), and it's only now that we've been able to see them.

That, however, is quite the accomplishment, as relativistic heavy ions collisions are so complex that we're hardly begun to understand what happens in them. Think a two-hundred-truck collision at 1,000 mph, and you're interested in what screw came from which truck and how the drivers' shoes were tied.

[No truck drivers were hurt in the writing of this comment!]

more than 4 years ago
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Fermilab Detects "Doubly Strange" Particle

MikTheUser Re:My Strange Quark (36 comments)

Now anyone think this story was posted just because the quark happens to be named "strange"?

Well, you certainly won't find Truth or Beauty here!

RIMSHOT!

more than 5 years ago
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Fermilab Detects "Doubly Strange" Particle

MikTheUser Re:Digital Hadron Calorimeter?!? (36 comments)

Well, it makes sense to someone familiar with accelerator design, but it's pretty redundant:

A calorimeter measures the deposition of energy along the trajectory of particles created in or scattered by a collision. Since other, more precise or better suited methods for measuring electromagnetic particles such as electron and muons exist, calorimeters are mostly used for hadrons. And it is highly likely that it be digital, because without a trigger for choosing ~200 events per second to be saved and processed out of hundreds of thousands that actually ocur every second, you'd have yourself a nice, useless analog calorimeter.

So yeah, "Digital Hadron Calorimeter" is a bit of a buzzword-fest, but it gets the message across.

more than 5 years ago
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Better Living Through Nukes?

MikTheUser Re:Probably forbidden by international treaties (432 comments)

I kindly invite you to RTFC to the end. The CTBT's article I reads: "Each State Party undertakes not to carry out any nuclear weapon test explosion or any other nuclear explosion, and to prohibit and prevent any such nuclear explosion at any place under its jurisdiction or control."

more than 5 years ago
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Better Living Through Nukes?

MikTheUser Probably forbidden by international treaties (432 comments)

There is a Treaty banning Nuclear Weapon Tests In The Atmosphere, In Outer Space And Under Water (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PTBT), which would probably hold and prevent this from happening, even though the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NNPT) still allows nuclear explosions for "peaceful purposes". Anyway, the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CTBT), which stands on much better fotting again since Obama supports it, would definitely prevent it.

more than 5 years ago
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Making Magnetic Monopoles and Other Physics Exotica

MikTheUser Re:Multiple monopoles? (104 comments)

I'm not sure it was ever supposed to apply to photons in any case.

Probably not, since photons, being their own antiparticles, never had arrows attached to them in Feynman graphs to begin with.

more than 5 years ago
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Making Magnetic Monopoles and Other Physics Exotica

MikTheUser Re:nobel (104 comments)

It wouldn't matter much at all to Maxwell's equations. The model is well fit to accommodate magnetic monopoles, if the

div B = 0

equation were modified to read, say

div B = rho_m / mu_0

in analogy to Gauss' law. The defining qualities of Maxwell's model, such as the compliance with relativity, would remain intact.

For further reading on this, David J. Griffiths' 'Introduction to Electrodynamics' is many a professor's first recommendation to students.

more than 5 years ago
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Getting Paid To Abandon an Open Source Project?

MikTheUser Re:How much is your soul worth? (654 comments)

I code for a living - I MAKE MONEY for selling the product of my skills. Welcome to the real world, folks. [...]
Does the amount you will make adequately compensate you for the loss of your ability to continue working on a "fun" project?

It would appear from the original question that there will be more at stake than the loss of fun to one person. Signing that contract in the middle of developing his new codebase would be tantamount to jumping out of a truck he himself took out on the freeway.

In my opinion, you should at least be allowed to park the truck somewhere it can be picked up by someone else, i.e. continue on the project by writing free code until the codebase is complete and you're not the only person able to maintain it anymore.

more than 6 years ago

Submissions

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How do you parse your lifetime?

MikTheUser MikTheUser writes  |  more than 7 years ago

mtu (761482) writes "Everyone of us has their own way of translating the integers that represent years into memories and experiences. How do you go about that? Do you go, "Oh, that was when Windows this-and-that came out!", or "Yeah, that was about when I got my Pentium {I,II,III,...}" — or maybe even, "Yeah, they'd just introduced this new C language?" Or has your life been so rich up until now that you don't need events in the Tech world to keep track?"

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