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ARIN Is Down To the Last /8 of IPv4 Addresses

MikeBabcock Re:It didn't matter whether it was last year or ne (234 comments)

Most of the ISPs I've dealt with here in Canada do not offer routable IPv6 allocations to users. They certainly don't readily offer static ones for business use like they do with IPv4.

yesterday
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ARIN Is Down To the Last /8 of IPv4 Addresses

MikeBabcock Re:Wasn't allocation always the problem? (234 comments)

The biggest problem has always been the global routing tables. Routing IPv6 is going to get ugly soon too, but we'll see how that turns out.

yesterday
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OpenSSL Cleanup: Hundreds of Commits In a Week

MikeBabcock Re:Heartbleed != malloc (374 comments)

instead of concentrating on replacing malloc, they could concentrate on replacing another part, namely designing buffer-types that contain buffer-size and are automatically bound-checked.
So heartbleed has something to do with their in-house memory management, in that they lost the opportunity to bake automatic bound checking into their custom memory manager.

One of the few quite brilliant things DJB did was write stralloc to avoid C string issues. I wish more people would use something similar in their code.

3 days ago
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How Nest and FitBit Might Spy On You For Cash

MikeBabcock This isn't spying (93 comments)

Everyone with a Nest is probably already aware of their Energy Partners https://nest.com/ca/energy-par... program.

Instead of having your utility company cut your power in the summer when its hot out like they do some places, Nest users' thermostats pre-cool their homes in the morning to reduce energy use during peak hours as determined by the power company. This is a win-win you sign up for, not a spying act.

If you don't want Nest to know about your energy usage, just disable its wifi connection. It still works fine without it.

4 days ago
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The Design Flaw That Almost Wiped Out an NYC Skyscraper

MikeBabcock Re:This is from the 99% Invisible Podcast. (182 comments)

Its right in the byline at the top of the article so it seems well-covered for those who click-through already. Also, I hate podcasts, so I'm glad they didn't link to that instead.

4 days ago
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Vintage 1960s Era Film Shows IRS Defending Its Use of Computers

MikeBabcock Context? (146 comments)

What else would the public be familiar with computers doing in the late 50's that would help them have context for this decision?

It seems to me that the computer was still an unknown entity to most people at the time.

about a week ago
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IRS Can Now Seize Your Tax Refund To Pay a Relative's Debt

MikeBabcock Re:The US needs a constitution (631 comments)

Because nobody's going to pass the law that makes politicians liable for their actions.

about two weeks ago
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IRS Can Now Seize Your Tax Refund To Pay a Relative's Debt

MikeBabcock Re:Good (631 comments)

Exactly -- also, this is why statutes of limitations exist; eventually its the states' fault for not noticing.

about two weeks ago
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IRS Can Now Seize Your Tax Refund To Pay a Relative's Debt

MikeBabcock Re:And they've already stopped (631 comments)

The big story up here in Canada last year was the IRS going after dual-citizens who'd not filed their incomes with the US ... because apparently they had to even though they didn't owe any taxes down there.

The IRS does lots of interesting things from one year to the next.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/...

about two weeks ago
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IRS Can Now Seize Your Tax Refund To Pay a Relative's Debt

MikeBabcock Re:Ex Post Facto Law (631 comments)

Pretty much what I was thinking ... I show up in court and say "your honour, five years ago, when there was a 10 year statute of limitations, I destroyed the records that would prove me innocent."

about two weeks ago
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Google: Teach Girls Coding, Get $2,500; Teach Boys, Get $0

MikeBabcock Re:Sex discrimination. (673 comments)

Companies aren't allowed to discriminate based on gender either, but this isn't the company being discriminatory, its the company rewarding discrimination, which is personally wrong, but probably outside the legal frameworks that exist.

about two weeks ago
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NSA Allegedly Exploited Heartbleed

MikeBabcock Re:It's time we own up to this one (149 comments)

I hate to disagree with you, but this has nothing to do with Open Source, it has to do with software engineering.

This same bug could have been introduced in closed-source software just as easily. The problem is making sure that software is securely reviewed before its disseminated, much like the OpenBSD people have been touting all these years, instead of just throwing things together however they work.

The only part F/OSS played in this is that we *found* the bug and can identify exactly when and how it occurred. All the bad parts of this situation are not unique to F/OSS.

about two weeks ago
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Linus Torvalds Suspends Key Linux Developer

MikeBabcock Re:Fire Linus (641 comments)

You do realize every intelligent person in the room tuned out at "Unfortunately" right?

That sentence is so boring I had to try three times just to read it completely. Bullet points? Oh god, kill me now.

Unless you expect your employees to vomit a little each time you talk to them, tone down the PC BS and speak straight to the issue.

about two weeks ago
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Linus Torvalds Suspends Key Linux Developer

MikeBabcock Re:Fire Linus (641 comments)

I also rapidly ignore PR sounding statements. I roll my eyes and move on.

I want criticisms to sound intelligent, not polite.

about two weeks ago
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Linus Torvalds Suspends Key Linux Developer

MikeBabcock Re:Fire Linus (641 comments)

I hate companies who believe what you just said. It just piles up until you have a big useless drone army who's so polite nothing can ever get fixed.

about two weeks ago
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Linus Torvalds Suspends Key Linux Developer

MikeBabcock Re:Fire Linus (641 comments)

Why should anyone who misbehaves in a public way be taken aside in a private way? The misbehaviour affects many people, not just Linus. Linus isn't speaking only on his own behalf, but on behalf of everyone who wants to debug the Linux kernel and not have systemd take their system down with it.

Linus' reaction *should* be public. This is Linux, not Windows. We operate out in the open.

about two weeks ago
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Linus Torvalds Suspends Key Linux Developer

MikeBabcock Re:Discipline (641 comments)

Why are /you/ confusing anger and discipline. First off, do you believe that discipline must preclude anger? Must they always be orthogonal? Do you believe that enforcing discipline cannot have any semblance of anger? Why not? I can't imagine a good reason.

Sometimes the very best way to fix a behaviour is to get mad at someone for it. A lot of people simply do not understand gentle prods and reminders.

about two weeks ago
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Linus Torvalds Suspends Key Linux Developer

MikeBabcock Re:systemd Architecture (641 comments)

If that were the goal, we could use djb's /service structure instead.

Launching processes in parallel is easy.
Launching them in parallel with an eye to dependencies is not much harder (can be done in a few lines of shell script).

systemd is a huge new operating environment for boot with an understanding of the hardware layer and message passing and all sorts of other neat and complex things. I dislike it entirely.

about two weeks ago
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Linus Torvalds Suspends Key Linux Developer

MikeBabcock Re:systemd Architecture (641 comments)

Exactly. DJB writes software to do a specific thing, and it does. If it doesn't, he admits fault. If it doesn't do some third thing you want but he didn't, he leaves that as your own problem. cf. netqmail vs. qmail.

That said, I'd much rather depend on /service and tcpserver for *any* network process than systemd. Why? I know they work *every damn time*.

about two weeks ago
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Linus Torvalds Suspends Key Linux Developer

MikeBabcock Re:systemd Architecture (641 comments)

Before systemd, I had a predictable system with a predictable boot sequence that I didn't have to test in a thousand different permutations.

I didn't have to depend on third-party software to handle things that used to be the responsibility of the software I was running.

I didn't have to learn a configuration file format just to launch a script at boot.

Hell, even DJB's /service system is *incredibly* simple compared to systemd with most of the power of the latter.

about two weeks ago

Submissions

MikeBabcock hasn't submitted any stories.

Journals

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Console vs. PC Gaming

MikeBabcock MikeBabcock writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Reading the recent piece by Alex St. John about PC gaming vs. consoles I just had way more to say than I could fit in replies to the subject so I blogged about it instead.

Yeah, I understand some people like gaming with headphones, a mouse and keyboard in their basement, but I prefer the couch, a big set of home theatre speakers, a wide screen HD TV and a controller in my hand with a headset on and a bluetooth keyboard next to me when necessary. I've been building PCs since I was 15 and I wouldn't have imagined it then, but console gaming is now at the point where its really not worth the bother to me to constantly keep up with my PCs capacity to play the newest titles.

Anyway, read more about my thoughts on my blog entry if you like.

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Hypocricy and religion

MikeBabcock MikeBabcock writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Due to recent events (pastors being outed / accused of things they ought not to do), I've been confronted by persons discussing the hypocrisy of Christianity.

I'll be brief -- such people are often completely ignorant of both Christianity and ethical/moral issues in general. It is frequently impossible or impractical for any person, regardless of their beliefs, to be 100% perfect in their own minds (and if they were, I believe there's a psychological condition they'd be diagnosed with).

The fact that a person believes they should not break the law and yet speeds to get to work faster or another believes pollution is evil and yet still heats their home with dirty power for example is enough to refer to such persons as hypocrites. But is there anything wrong with the goals they have, despite failing to achieve them?

The bible states that those who follow Christianity will be known for love, kindness, self-control and gentleness among other qualities and that against these things there is no law.

I'd like to say I do not defend anyone's wrongdoings, but there are a few misconceptions that need outing:

1) What the bible says about Christianity is what I believe, not what some evangelist on TV said. This makes me a fundamentalist by definition. Would you prefer I follow said evangelists' views instead of formulating my own?

2) Having the goal of achieving something and failing does not make the goal system irrelevant or in any way wrong -- we're all imperfect human beings striving toward whatever we set our minds to, sometimes we're just stuck or we screw up. (PS, that's Christianity too -- that people are fallen and fallible, not in any way perfect, with the goal of becoming better). ... and more, but I'm done ranting for now. Please, if you think Christianity is stupid, do your research and don't just play follow the leader from what someone else has told you. If you're against Christianity because Christians are jerks, well, they're probably not really Christians (falls under 'do your research'). Try not to be as overbearing with them as they are with you.

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Ignorant people

MikeBabcock MikeBabcock writes  |  more than 9 years ago

I just added someone to my foes list simply for being an ignorant jerk. They posted this comment in another user's journal about boxing in fast cars just to piss them off.

I happen to get paid to do support, often driving to a dozen locations in a day and those people lose me money. I've called the cops on them for holding up traffic and thoroughly enjoyed watching them get pulled over and having the rules of safe driving explained to them (speed isn't as important as safe flow).

I sure hope somebody gets this guy pulled over a few times as a result of his ignorance. That kind of "I'm so smart" attitude will get you hurt. And you'll have it coming; my family has an expression ... "you can be dead right".

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Dealing with losing a son ...

MikeBabcock MikeBabcock writes  |  more than 9 years ago

Its almost been a year since my wife and I went into the hospital to give birth to our wonderful baby boy who died just three days later.

I had every intention of setting up a small section of my website with some pictures of him and commentary but haven't brought myself to do that yet.

I have however posted a summary of the events on my Wikipedia page.

Please note; donations are still suggested to Mount Sinai Hospital although if you wish to add it to those in his (Colin Isaac Babcock's) memory, you can't make a donation online (yet).

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Friends of friends, etc.

MikeBabcock MikeBabcock writes  |  more than 9 years ago

This is a short sequel to my previous journal entry. I quite enjoyed this message by Khasim (1285) recently but chuckled a little at the icons he has for me:

  • Friend
  • Friend of a Friend
  • Foe of a Friend

It seems at least one of my 'friends' doesn't like this user, one does and I do. The irony is that the one person who doesn't is someone I only added to my list so as to see their sometimes intelligent views on things, although I usually disagree with their vantage point.

The message is #10486464 if you care.

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Adding 'Friends'

MikeBabcock MikeBabcock writes  |  more than 9 years ago

Since I noticed the ability for Slashdot to change ratings on messages based on my friends list, I've started adding more and more of the "enlightened" people I notice to my friends list.

I've given a +2 bonus modifier to my friends so I can see what those people whose opinions I've previously valued have to say (and also notice if they never again have anything useful to say).

What I'm finding interesting now that I've reached a couple dozen people on my friends list is how many people I click the neutral circle on and discover that they are a friend of at least one of my friends. It seems that birds of a feather really do ... oh never mind.

At any rate, it was interesting to me.

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Helping out

MikeBabcock MikeBabcock writes  |  more than 10 years ago

I've been asked if there's any way to help with the condition my wife has (see previous journal entries for background).

The short answer is of course yes, please donate to a group doing advanced (and open) genetics research. This will benefit us all. My wife has been part of a test group for some research in Philidelphia who have done much advanced work in the use of modified viruses to affect genetic mutations and the like.

Consider donating to the National Urea Cycle Disorders Foundation (United States) or the Mount Sinai Hospital Foundation (Canada). Donations have been made already to each in the memory of my late son, Colin Isaac Babcock. If you wish to add to those, feel free to mention his name when you give.

Mount Sinai has been phenomenal in their care; our doctors have been very hands-on, very involved and concerned and have even called us at home on multiple occasions since the passing of my son to keep in touch and make sure we're okay. The nursing staff is incredible and delivering upwards of 40 to 50 babies a day, mostly high-risk would make any person dizzy -- these people work hard to keep things calm but personal and give great, fast and consistent care.

I'll probably post more about this when I have the energy on my personal website ...

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One shouldn't have to bury one's son

MikeBabcock MikeBabcock writes  |  more than 10 years ago

My wife went into labour on Thursday and delivered a beautiful baby boy at 10:30 AM. We had a couple great days with him but he died of ammonia poisoning from his genetic condition (OTC deficiency) today at 2:10 PM. We're glad we had two good days and he didn't suffer much and lived a life full of love, albeit short.

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Bad news sucks

MikeBabcock MikeBabcock writes  |  more than 10 years ago

My wife and I just found out that our second baby, due in December is a carrier of OTC (which my wife has) and is a boy, which means that he will die within days of birth.

There are no treatments for infants, especially of the genetic form and it is very rare.

http://www.emedicine.com/ped/topic2744.htm for more info.

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