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Supreme Court Ruling Relaxes Warrant Requirements For Home Searches

Misch Re:Sure (500 comments)

It seems to me that this could be interpreted to allow the following scenario: A police informant runs out of gas in front of your house. You let him in to use your phone so he can get a ride. The police then mysteriously show up wanting in. You tell them no but from behind you the informant yells "come right in."

That's not what's going on in this case though.

The /. summary is wrong.

Using your case as an example, you kindly let the informant in. Later, police come to your door. The officer asks "may we search your place?" You say "no". Doesn't matter what the informant says. Your "no" still rules, as long as you are still there. That's still going to be the case.

US v. Matlock, 1974 allowed the search as long as someone who could consent did consent. "Government must show, inter alia, not only that it reasonably appeared to the officers that the person had authority to consent, but also that the person had actual authority to permit the search..."

Georgia v. Randolph, 2006, changed it so that if any occupant objected, then the search could not take place.

Today's ruling, Fernandez v. California clarified and limited the exception from Georgia v. Randolph. If the person who objected to the search isn't there, and the person there is able to and does consent to a search, the search is valid.

about 7 months ago
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Next Up: the Jamming Wars

Misch GPS jamming near an airport (209 comments)

Interestingly enough, there was a guy who was recently busted for putting a GPS jammer on his truck. It was discovered when he drove near an airport and impacted the testing of GPS-enhanced plane landing equipment.

Source.

The person was fined $32,000 and was fired by the company he was working for.

about a year ago
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Linux Mint 15 'Olivia' Is Out

Misch Re:Did they fix upgrade-in-place? (185 comments)

You don't have to.

Mint also has a pretty good backup program (mintBackup) that remembers the software packages you had installed and you can install them again later.

about a year ago
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Light Bulb Ban Produces Hoarding In EU, FUD In U.S.

Misch Re:The whole idea is dumb (1080 comments)

Have you considered how much mercury gets released into the air by burning coal for electricity generation?

Comparatively, a heck of a lot more mercury gets released from coal power plants in a year than has ever been included in every CFL bulb ever manufactured.

Besides, halogen incandescent bulbs meet the new requirements, you don't need to use CFL bulbs.

about 2 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: Best Option For Printing Digital Photos?

Misch Re:Wal-Mart (350 comments)

Wegmans got out of the photo processing business in 2008.

http://rochesterhomepage.net/fulltext/?nxd_id=36631

more than 2 years ago
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Denver Must Prove Red-Light Cameras Improve Safety

Misch Re:Law and Regulation? (433 comments)

Technically speaking, it should be based on observed speed of people traveling on the road. However, standards have been weakened over time such that yellow light timing can be based on the speed limit rather than real-world speeds.

Source

The 1994 ITE "Determining Vehicle Signal Change and Clearance Interval" states:
When the percentage of vehicles that entered on a red indication exceeds that which is locally acceptable, the yellow change interval may be lengthened (or shortened) until the percentage conforms to local standards, or enforcement can be used instead.

There's a better analysis of how signal timing standards have been changed in the link.

more than 2 years ago
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Denver Must Prove Red-Light Cameras Improve Safety

Misch Re:Changed my mind (433 comments)

Was it Washington, DC?

Source

The [Washington] Post obtained a D.C. database generated from accident reports filed by police. The data covered the entire city, including the 37 intersections where cameras were installed in 1999 and 2000.

The analysis shows that the number of crashes at locations with cameras more than doubled, from 365 collisions in 1998 to 755 [in 2004]. Injury and fatal crashes climbed 81 percent, from 144 such wrecks to 262. Broadside crashes, also known as right-angle or T-bone collisions, rose 30 percent, from 81 to 106 during that time frame.
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.
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The results were similar or worse than figures at intersections that have traffic signals but no cameras. The number of overall crashes at those 1,520 locations increased 64 percent; injury and fatal crashes rose 54 percent; and broadside collisions rose 17 percent.

Overall, total crashes in the city rose 61 percent, from 11,333 in 1998 to 18,250 last year.

more than 2 years ago
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Hybrid Storage Solutions Compared

Misch Re:Um (61 comments)

Doesn't really matter.

Anand from Anandtech writes:

My personal desktop sees about 7GB of writes per day. That can be pretty typical for a power user and a bit high for a mainstream user but it's nothing insane. ...
If I never install another application and just go about my business, my drive has 203.4GB of space to spread out those 7GB of writes per day. That means in roughly 29 days my SSD, if it wear levels perfectly, I will have written to every single available flash block on my drive. Tack on another 7 days if the drive is smart enough to move my static data around to wear level even more properly. So we're at approximately 36 days before I exhaust one out of my ~10,000 write cycles. Multiply that out and it would take 360,000 days of using my machine for all of my NAND to wear out; once again, assuming perfect wear leveling. That's 986 years. Your NAND flash cells will actually lose their charge well before that time comes, in about 10 years.

more than 2 years ago
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Six-Drive SATA III SSD Round-Up Shows Big Gains

Misch Re:they still need to be a lot bigger now 500GB an (129 comments)

I saw an OCZ Vertex 2 - 240 GB drive for $300 after rebate recently.

http://www.fatwallet.com/forums/hot-deals/1110607/

Prices are getting better on the previous generation of SSD drives.

more than 3 years ago
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Los Angeles To Turn Off Traffic-Light Cameras

Misch Re:Protip: (367 comments)

The yellow light is there to warn you the light is changing so you have time to stop. Cities will put the public in more danger just to bring in higher revenue.

Nope!

Believe it or not, a 1985 & 1989 change to ITE standards for traffic signal timing added: "Allow easy identification of violators by law enforcement agents." as an objective for traffic signal timing.

more than 3 years ago
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Los Angeles To Turn Off Traffic-Light Cameras

Misch Re:Traffic Light Safety (367 comments)

The real problem is that yellow signal timing standards have been weakened.

thenewspaper.com covers the weakening of the standard here

Essentially, yellow signal timing needs to take into account human reaction time, the actual speed that traffic goes through an intersection, and time needed to clear the intersection. In 1976, the standard did.

1985 and 1989 revisions to the ITE standard made changes:
1989 standard: "It may be possible to use the posted speed as the approach speed." - Posted speed limits, as opposed to the actual speed that traffic goes through an intersection could be considered for setting yellow signal timing.

There are other changes detailed that impact yellow time.

more than 3 years ago
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Los Angeles To Turn Off Traffic-Light Cameras

Misch Re:tradeoffs (367 comments)

Actually, in a study in Washington DC, collisions of all kinds increased at red light camera intersections compared to signaled intersections without red light cameras.

The analysis shows that the number of crashes at locations with cameras more than doubled, from 365 collisions in 1998 to 755 last year. Injury and fatal crashes climbed 81 percent, from 144 such wrecks to 262. Broadside crashes, also known as right-angle or T-bone collisions, rose 30 percent, from 81 to 106 during that time frame. Traffic specialists say broadside collisions are especially dangerous because the sides are the most vulnerable areas of cars ...
The results were similar or worse than figures at intersections that have traffic signals but no cameras. The number of overall crashes at those 1,520 locations increased 64 percent; injury and fatal crashes rose 54 percent; and broadside collisions rose 17 percent.

source, Washington Post

more than 3 years ago
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Anatomy of a Privacy Nightmare

Misch Re:It wasn't his Tweet (275 comments)

And in addition the yFrog CEO has come out to say publicly that there is no evidence that their password system was compromised.
http://www.foundingbloggers.com/wordpress/2011/06/yfrog-ceo-no-reason-to-believe-weiners-security-was-violated/

Now, who's filtering facts again?

And now here's the UPDATE: Reader "milowent" took up the challenge. Without knowing my password -- without hacking into my account -- he got a third image into my Yfrog account, using the simple technique explained above. Here's the image he sent me:

Source

Cannonfire says essentially 'they were able to post a picture to my YFrog account without my password'
YFrog CEO says 'There is no evidence our password system was compromised'

Can you see that the two are not mutually exclusive?

Police say: "The front door of the house was not tampered with"
Reporter says: "The burglar entered the house without opening the front door. He went in through the unlocked back door."

These two statements are not mutually exclusive either.

more than 3 years ago
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Anatomy of a Privacy Nightmare

Misch Re:Alleged picture (275 comments)

YFrog disabled its post-by-email feature after this incident.

From the link:
Reader "milowent" took up the challenge. Without knowing my password -- without hacking into my account -- he got a third image into my Yfrog account, using the simple technique explained above. Here's the image he sent me:

YFrog apparently had a security hole that got plugged after this incident.

more than 3 years ago
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Compared to a year or two ago, I find I'm printing ...

Misch Re:Linux support for non-HP laser printers (252 comments)

I've had good luck with a Samsung ML-1210 being well supported by CUPS under both Mandriva and now Mint.

more than 3 years ago
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House Fails To Extend Patriot Act Spy Powers

Misch Re:Hmm. (284 comments)

Only 26 republicans voted against this bill. 122 democrats voted against this bill. Only 7 of those 26 republicans are considered teabaggers.

more than 3 years ago
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Do Tools Ever 'Die?'

Misch Re:Modem? (615 comments)

Home pacemaker evaluation kits also have something similar to an acoustic modem. A little more forgiving than acoustic modems (One can use a modern cordless phone and just lay it down over the connection points.)

more than 2 years ago

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