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Comments

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Acer Launches First 4K Panel With NVIDIA G-Sync Technology On Board

MojoKid Re:$799 for a 4K 28" panel is a PREMIUM price??? (64 comments)

The note was versus "standard 28-inch panels"... not 4K. Yes, this is a solid price for a 4K 60Hz panel, with or without G-Sync. However, you can get standard 28-inch panels for a lot less and even Samsung, Dell and Asus non-G-Sync 4K panels for as little as $429 to about $600 now.

about a month ago
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Intel Discloses Core M Broadwell Speeds, Feeds and Performance Expectations

MojoKid Re:MOAR GPU (60 comments)

Yep, indeed they are. And fortunately capability and drivers are getting slightly better with each revision as well.

about 2 months ago
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Dell's New Alienware Case Goes to Extremes To Prevent Overheating

MojoKid Re:Chill out - I dig it (149 comments)

That was refreshing. Thanks

about a month ago
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Dell's New Alienware Case Goes to Extremes To Prevent Overheating

MojoKid Re:How much? (149 comments)

No one made this article or anything in it "appear to be a review." It's an announcement and news release, that's it. There is no mention of testing, or passing judgement other than maybe an opinion on the design aesthetic, which is completely subjective anyway. At this point the dialog has gone off topic and off the rails, rather than discussing the post at hand. So I'm done with it. Carry on. Thanks

about a month ago
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Dell's New Alienware Case Goes to Extremes To Prevent Overheating

MojoKid Re:How much? (149 comments)

Sure, OK, 5-10 for a domain and hosting is chump change and sites like this are all run by volunteers. You go with that. Whatever works for ya.

about 2 months ago
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Dell's New Alienware Case Goes to Extremes To Prevent Overheating

MojoKid Re:How much? (149 comments)

Thank you, well said.

about 2 months ago
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Dell's New Alienware Case Goes to Extremes To Prevent Overheating

MojoKid Re:How much? (149 comments)

I'm guessing that blocking

googletagservices.com googleusercontent.com tru.am

before visiting his site will make that a little more difficult.

I do not know if he is a Slashdot or a Dice Holdings, Inc., employee, but it would be nice if there was some sort of transparency statement, if that's the case.

Regards,

Aryeh Goretsky

Seriously? Why do people that read a legitimate news story always try to assume something is advertising. This was a press coordinated announcement by Dell-Alienware. It's a VERY cool case and system design I think, so I submitted our story on it. Yes, I run HotHardware.com and no it's not even close to an advertisement. It's just our usual news coverage on a variety of topics around the computing space. Alienware had a press release on this new system design and we covered it, along with many other Tech news outlets I'm sure.

And ad blocking. Don't even get me started. So many ad blockers are so proud of what they do, like it's some badge of honor to block. If everyone blocked ads, many quality web sites would likely cease to exist, including Slashdot. Just because you can block, doesn't mean you should. The internet is no different than any other media, where ads pay the bills to keep the lights on and people employed to serve up news, reviews and other content you enjoy every day, essentially for free.

And good sites (like Slashdot and HotHardware) know how to separate church and state, where advertising does not affect editorial opinion.

about 2 months ago
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Chinese State Media Declares iPhone a Threat To National Security

MojoKid Libritard? I take exception to that, u anondouche (143 comments)

Hey, Anonodouche, why don't you post under your profile? For the record, this has zero to do with the liberal or conservative agenda. And yeah, I'm f'ing Republicanassholish.

about 4 months ago
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Overkill? LG Phone Has 2560x1440 Display, Laser Focusing

MojoKid Re:Embarrasment (198 comments)

HA! So true! And 4K desktop displays have a long way to go still as well.

about 4 months ago
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NVIDIA Tegra Note 7 Tested, Fastest Android 4.3 Slate Under $200

MojoKid Re:Slashvertisement Alert!! (not) (107 comments)

The product was released at the end of NOVEMBER and is just now getting out to retail. No need to shout that. And just because an article here speaks to a product's salient features (both good and not so good - lest you forget the lower res display was mentioned too) doesn't make it an advertisement.

about 10 months ago
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NVIDIA Tegra Note 7 Tested, Fastest Android 4.3 Slate Under $200

MojoKid Re:Slashvertisement Alert!! (not) (107 comments)

Yes, and that slashvertisement BS is getting mighty old. It's a legitimate product review that discusses the pluses and minuses of the product. Take time to actually read the content submitted instead of being so judgmental maybe?

about 10 months ago
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All-in-Ones Finally Grow Up, With Fast Graphics, SSDs, and CPUs

MojoKid Not an ad, please read in context (211 comments)

Also, I noted the Dell machine as "an example" of more powerful configs that are coming to AIOs now. Apple's line of iMac have definitely been better in terms of higher-end components over the years. I could have also cited HP's new Z1 - http://hothardware.com/Reviews/HP-Z1-27inch-AIO-Workstation-Review/ - which has an Intel Xeon processor and NVIDIA Quadro pro graphics engine under the hood but again these are new machines and the point was, as tech has marched on, the all-in-one has gotten much more capable from a performance standpoint.

about a year ago
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All-in-Ones Finally Grow Up, With Fast Graphics, SSDs, and CPUs

MojoKid Re: What fud (211 comments)

Ummm... FUD? You're using that term incorrectly. So where's the fail? If I was trying to create fear uncertainty and doubt it must have been with you.

And we've seen AIOs from many manufacturers for years, which couldn't get out of their own way, in terms of what power users need performance-wise. iMac are a minor exception. They've had somewhat better specs but not SSD caches and 2GB GGDR5 enabled, seriously strong graphics like the new GeForce GT 750M. In fact, as I look at Apple's iMac load-out page now, I see last gen graphics mostly with 512MB configs.

about a year ago
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Nokia Lumia 1020 Video and Photo Shoot Preview

MojoKid Re:Digital image stabilization makes a comeback. (178 comments)

Really? I mean, REALLY? We're going to now compare actual DLSR specs, features and the damn manual to this SMARTPHONE? The comment was "virtually" as in not ALL controls but virtually, as in similar to or more so than any other smartphone camera on the market. I think it's understood, isn't it? It's a damn phone camera.

about a year ago
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Nokia Lumia 1020 Video and Photo Shoot Preview

MojoKid Re:Digital image stabilization makes a comeback. (178 comments)

Actually, it DOES have the following that you note... "shutter aperture, manual AF, bracketing and viewfinder grid"... so what's laughable?

about a year ago
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Nokia Lumia 1020 Video and Photo Shoot Preview

MojoKid Re:Digital image stabilization makes a comeback. (178 comments)

Hate all you like but this is no "paid review" and actually, it's just a preview look, not a full review. Yeah, trying to sell sh** for MS, that's what's going on. If you bothered to watch the video demo you would have noted that one of the downsides of the device that was called out was the fact that Windows Phone isn't at the level of Android or iOS, from an ecosystem standpoint. Someone once said, "don't feed the trolls"... so why am I tempted every time? No need to answer that.

about a year ago
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Nokia Lumia 1020 Video and Photo Shoot Preview

MojoKid Re:Digital image stabilization makes a comeback. (178 comments)

The context of the article notes controls "like you'd find in any DSLR camera." These controls allow you to actually affect image capture settings. Nokia didn't use that to "trick" people into anything. They just gave users more control over settings. The reality is, the camera and app are the best for any camera phone on the market now, but yet, it's still a built-in smartphone camera, albeit a really good one for what it is.

about a year ago

Submissions

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Alienware's Triangular Area-51 Re-Design With Tri-SLI GeForce GTX 980, Tested

MojoKid MojoKid writes  |  2 days ago

MojoKid (1002251) writes "For some folks, Alienware gaming PC designs can be an either "you love it or hate it" affair. Along these lines, Dell's Alienware division recently released a radical redesign of their Area-51 gaming desktop. With 45-degree angled front and rear face plates, that are designed to direct control and IO up toward the user, in addition to better directing cool airflow in, while backside warm airflow is directed up and away from the rear of the chassis, this triangular-shaped machine grabs your attention right away. In testing and benchmarks, the Area-51's new design enables top-end performance with thermal and acoustic profiles that are fairly impressive versus most high-end gaming PC systems. The chassis design is also pretty clean, modular and easily servicable. Base system pricing isn't too bad, starting at $1699 with the ability to dial things way up to an 8-core Haswell-E chip and triple GPU graphics from NVIDIA and AMD. The test system reviewed at HotHardware was powered by a six-core Core i7-5930K chip and three GeForce GTX 980 cards in SLI. As expected, it ripped through the benchmarks, though the price as configured and tested is significantly higher."
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Apple A8X iPad Air 2 Processor Packs Triple-Core CPU, Hefty Graphics Punch

MojoKid MojoKid writes  |  4 days ago

MojoKid (1002251) writes "When Apple debuted its A8 SoC, it proved to be a modest tweak of the original A7. Despite packing double the transistors and an improved GPU, the heart of the A8 SoC is the same dual-core Apple "Cycle" processor tweaked to run at higher clock speeds and with stronger total GPU performance. Given this, many expected that the Apple A8X would be cut from similar cloth — a higher clock speed, perhaps, and a larger GPU, but not much more than that. It appears those projections were wrong. The Apple A8X chip is a triple-core variant of the A8, with a higher clock speed (1.5GHz vs. 1.4GHz), a larger L2 cache (2MB, up from 1MB) and 2GB of external DDR3. It also uses an internal metal heatspreader, which the Apple A8 eschews. All of this points to slightly higher power consumption for the core, but also to dramatically increased performance. The new A8X is a significant power house in multiple types of workloads; in fact, its the top-performing mobile device on Geekbench by a wide margin. Gaming benchmarks are equally impressive. The iPad Air 2 nudges out Nvidia's Shield in GFXBench's Manhattan offscreen test, at 32.4fps to 31 fps. Onscreen favors the NV solution thanks to its lower-resolution screen, but the Nvidia device does take 3DMark Ice Storm Unlimited by a wide margin, clocking in at 30,970 compared to 21,659."
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'PiPads' Are Coming, Raspberry Pi Tablets To Arrive By Year End

MojoKid MojoKid writes  |  5 days ago

MojoKid (1002251) writes "Since the Raspberry Pi mini-computer hit the market in early 2012, the company behind it has wanted to release a touch display that perfectly complements it. RPi's founder, Eben Upton, revealed at TechCrunch's Disrupt conference that it's finally on its way. Get ready to build your very-own "PiPad". Admittedly, to call anything a tablet that's simply a touchscreen connected to a small motherboard is trying too hard, but clunkiness aside, the possibilities here are endless. Assuming that the price is kept low, just like the RPi is, this could be a huge boon to those wanting to implement touch into their projects."
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PCMark for Android Shows Which Devices Sacrifice Battery-Life For Performance

MojoKid MojoKid writes  |  about two weeks ago

MojoKid (1002251) writes "A couple of weeks ago, Futuremark began handing out copies of PCMark for Android to members of the press, in an effort to get its leaderboards filled while the finishing touches were being put on the app. That might give you pause in that the results, generated today, are not going to be entirely accurate when the final version comes out, but that's not the case. Futuremark has encouraged publication of results generated with the benchmark. What makes PCMark for Android useful benchmark is that it not only tests for performance, but also for battery-life and performance combined. As such, you can easily figure out which devices sacrifice battery-life for performance and which ones have a good blend of both. The HTC One M8 really stands out, thanks to its nearly balanced performance/battery-life ratio. A result like that might make you think that neither value could be that great, but that's not the case at all. In fact, the battery-life rating on that phone places far beyond some of the other models, only falling short to the OnePlus One. And speaking of that phone, it becomes obvious with PCMark why it's so hyped-up of late; it not only delivers solid performance, it boasts great battery-life as well."
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ISPs Violating Net Neutrality, Blocking Encryption And Putting Users At Risk

MojoKid MojoKid writes  |  about two weeks ago

MojoKid (1002251) writes "In July, VPN provider Golden Frog (creators of the VyprVPN service) debuted front and center in the debate over net neutrality. One of their customers, Colin Nederkoorn, published a video showing how switching to VyprVPN increased his network performance by a factor of 10 on Verizon while streaming Netflix. Now, Golden Frog has filed a brief with the FCC, discussing both this incident and another, more troubling problem for security advocates — the detection of ISPs performing man-in-the-middle attacks against their own customers. According to information cited in the briefing, one wireless provider was caught blocking the use of STARTTLS encryption. STARTTLS is used to encrypt traffic sent over SMTP — email, in other words. Because an email from Point A to Point Z may travel through a number of unsecured routers to reach its final destination, unencrypted email is intrinsically insecure. STARTTLS was developed to mitigate this problem. What Golden Frog documented was the interception and modification of multiple requests to begin using STARTTLS into an entirely different set of commands, thereby preventing the encrypted link from ever being established. The problem of overwritten encryption is potentially far more serious than an issue of Netflix throttling, even if the latter tapped consumer discontent more readily."
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Android On Intel x86 Tablet Performance Explored, Things Are Improving

MojoKid MojoKid writes  |  about two weeks ago

MojoKid (1002251) writes "For the past few years, Intel has promised that its various low-power Atom-based processors would usher in a wave of low-cost Android and Windows mobile products that could compete with ARM-based solutions. And for years, we've seen no more than a trickle of hardware, often with limited availability. Now, that's finally beginning to change. Intel's Bay Trail and Merrifield SoCs are starting to show up more in full-featured, sub-$200 devices from major brands. One of the most interesting questions for would-be x86 buyers in the Android tablet space, is whether to go with a Merrifield or Bay Trail Atom-based device. Merrifield is a dual-core chip without Hyper-Threading. Bay Trail is a quad-core variant and a graphics engine derived from Intel's Ivy Bridge Core series CPUs. That GPU is the other significant difference between the two SoCs. With Bay Trail, Intel is still employing their own graphics solution, while Merrifield pairs a dual-core CPU with a PowerVR G6400 graphics core. So, what's the experience of using a tablet running Android on x86 like these days? Pretty much like using an ARM-based Android tablet currently, and surprisingly good for any tablet in the $199 or less bracket. In fact, some of the low cost Intel/Android solutions out there currently from the likes of Acer, Dell, Asus and Lenovo, all compete performance-wise pretty well versus the current generation of mainstream ARM-based Android tablets."
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Microsoft Develops Analog Keyboard For Wearables, Solves Small Display Dilemma

MojoKid MojoKid writes  |  about three weeks ago

MojoKid (1002251) writes "Have you ever tried hunting and pecking on a miniature keyboard that's been crammed onto a smartwatch's tiny display? Unless the tips of your fingers somehow resemble that of a stylus, you're in for a challenge. Interestingly enough, it's Microsoft that might have the most logical solution for typing on small size displays running Google's Android Wear platform. Microsoft's research division has built an analog keyboard prototype for Android Wear that eliminates the need to tap at tiny letters, and instead has you write them out. On the surface, such a solution seems like you'd be trading one tedious task for another, though a demo of the technology in action shows that this could be a promising solution — watch how fast the guy in the video is able to hammer out a response."
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NSA To Scientists: We Won't Tell You What We've Told You, That's Classified

MojoKid MojoKid writes  |  about three weeks ago

MojoKid (1002251) writes "One of the downsides to the news cycle is that no matter how big or hot a story is, something else inevitably comes along. The advent of ISIS and Ebola, combined with the passing of time, have pushed national security concerns out of the limelight — until, that is, someone at the NSA helps out by reminding us that yes, the agency still exists and yes, it still has some insane policies and restrictions. Earlier this year, the Federation of American Scientists filed a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request with the NSA. The group was seeking information it thought would be relatively low-key — what authorized information had been leaked to the media over the past 12 months? The NSA's response reads as follows: "The document responsive to your request has been reviewed by this Agency as required by the FOIA and has been found to be currently and properly classified in accordance with Executive Order 13526. The document is classified because its disclosure could reasonably be expected to cause exceptionally grave damage to the national security." The NSA is insisting that it has the right to keep its lawful compliance and public disclosures secret not because the NSA is made of evil people but because the NSA has a knee-jerk preference and demand for secrecy. In a spy organization, that's understandable and admirable but it's precisely the opposite of what's needed to rebuild American's faith in the institution and it's judgment."
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Ubisoft Claims CPU Specs A Limiting Factor In Assassin's Creed Unity On Consoles

MojoKid MojoKid writes  |  about three weeks ago

MojoKid (1002251) writes "A new interview with Assassin's Creed Unity senior producer Vincent Pontbriand has some gamers seeing red and others crying "told you so," after the developer revealed that the game's 900p framerate and 30 fps target on consoles is a result of weak CPU performance rather than GPU compute. "Technically we're CPU-bound," Pontbriand said. "The GPUs are really powerful, obviously the graphics look pretty good, but it's the CPU that has to process the AI, the number of NPCs we have on screen, all these systems running in parallel. We were quickly bottlenecked by that and it was a bit frustrating, because we thought that this was going to be a tenfold improvement over everything AI-wise..." This has been read by many as a rather damning referendum on the capabilities of AMD's APU that's under the hood of Sony's and Microsoft's new consoles. To some extent, that's justified; the Jaguar CPU inside both the Sony PS4 and Xbox One is a modest chip with a relatively low clock speed. Both consoles may offer eight CPU threads on paper, but games can't access all that headroom. One thread is reserved for the OS and a few more cores will be used for processing the 3D pipeline. Between the two, Ubisoft may have only had 4-5 cores for AI and other calculations — scarcely more than last gen, and the Xbox 360 and PS3 CPUs were clocked much faster than the 1.6 / 1.73GHz frequencies of their replacements."
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AMD's Rory Read Steps Down As CEO, Dr. Lisa Su Appointed President And CEO

MojoKid MojoKid writes  |  about three weeks ago

MojoKid (1002251) writes "AMD has just announced a new chief and her name is Dr. Lisa Su. She replaces Rory Read, who has stepped down as president and CEO as part of a transition plan that will have him support the new boss in an advisory role. Read will remain with AMD through the end of the year. Read replaced Dirk Meyer as CEO of AMD back in August 2011. While not particularly animated or, quite frankly, all that interesting to listen to during keynotes, Read wasn't brought in to put on a show. His job was to promote the AMD brand and build connections with other industry players, and to his credit, that's what he did during the past three years. He also returned the company to non-GAAP profitability. Dr. Su brings with her an impressive resume that includes prior experience with Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., Texas Instruments, and IBM, the latter of which she spent 13 years in various engineering and business leadership positions."
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NVIDIA Launches Mobile Maxwell GeForce GTX 980M And GTX 970M Notebook Graphics

MojoKid MojoKid writes  |  about three weeks ago

MojoKid (1002251) writes "When Nvidia launched their new GeForce GTX 980 and 970 last month, it was obvious that these cards would be coming to mobile sooner rather than later. The significant increase that Maxwell offers in performance-per-watt means that these GPUs should shine in mobile contexts, maybe even more-so than in desktop. Today, Nvidia is unveiling two new mobile GPUs — the GeForce GTX 980M and 970M. Both notebook graphics engines are based on Maxwell's 28nm architecture, and both are trimmed slightly from the full desktop implementation. The GTX 980M is a 1536-core chip (just like the GTX 680 / 680M) while the GTX 970 will pack 1280 cores. Clock speeds are 1038MHz base for the GTX 980M and 924MHz for the GTX 970M, which is significantly faster than the previous gen GTX 680M's launch speeds. The 980M will carry up to 4GB of RAM, while the 970M will offer 3GB and a smaller memory bus. From eyeballing relative performance expectations, the GTX 970M should be well-suited to 1080p or below at high detail levels, while the GTX 980M should be capable of ultra detail at 1080p or higher resolutions. Maxwell's better efficiency means that it should offer a significant performance improvement over mobile Kepler, even with the same number of cores. Also with this launch Nvidia is introducing "Battery Boost" as a solution for games with less demanding graphics, where battery life can be extended by governing clock speeds to maintain playable frames, without overpower the GPU at higher than needed frame rates."
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Modder Hacks Star Wars: The Old Republic MMO Client, Changes In-Game Data

MojoKid MojoKid writes  |  about three weeks ago

MojoKid (1002251) writes "When Star Wars: The Old Republic made news in September, it was for announcing that one of the mythos' most enduring antiheroes, the onetime Sith Lord Revan, would be making an appearance in the MMO. Now, a new bug could wipe some of that goodwill off the map. Modder and TOR enthusiast SWTorMiner has created a video that shows him fixing a simple visual bug (introduced in one of the recent game patches) to make a character's eyewear render properly. SWTorMiner doesn't claim to have discovered the bug himself, but he's drawing attention to it precisely because it allows for much larger hacks than just replacing a bit of cosmetic detail. In theory, this same exploit could be used to allow access to areas of the game that are currently locked out, either because previous bosses haven't yet been killed, or because PvP battlegrounds are still in warm-up periods. These are the kinds of problems that can rapidly balloon and challenge the fundamental nature of the game."
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Lost Opportunity? Windows 10 Has The Same Minimum PC Requirements As Vista

MojoKid MojoKid writes  |  about a month ago

MojoKid (1002251) writes "Buried in the details of Microsoft's technical preview for Windows 10 is a bit of a footnote concerning the operating system's requirements. Windows 10 will have exactly the same requirements as Windows 8.1, which had the same requirements as Windows 8, which stuck to Windows 7 specs, which was the same as Windows Vista. At this point, it's something we take for granted with future Windows release. As the years roll by, you can't help wondering what we're actually giving up in exchange for holding the minimum system spec at a single-core 1GHz, 32-bit chip with just 1GB of RAM. The average smartphone is more powerful than this these days. For decades, the standard argument has been that Microsoft had to continue supporting ancient operating systems and old configurations, ignoring the fact that the company did its most cutting-edge work when it was willing to kill off its previous products in fairly short order. what would Windows look like if Microsoft at least mandated a dual-core product? What if DX10 — a feature set that virtually every video card today supports, according to Valve's Steam Hardware Survey, became the minimum standard, at least on the x86 side of the equation? How much better might the final product be if Microsoft put less effort into validating ancient hardware and kicked those specs upwards, just a notch or two?"
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Micron Launches First SSD Based On 16nm NAND Flash

MojoKid MojoKid writes  |  about 1 month ago

MojoKid (1002251) writes "Samsung made some waves earlier this year with the introduction of its 850 Pro family of solid state drives and the first commercial use of 3D stacked NAND Flash memory. Micron is striking back today with a lower manufacturing process geometry in conventional NAND, however, and a new Flash technology it claims, will accelerate performance more effectively than other competing solutions. The new Micron M600 family of solid state drives will launch at capacities ranging from 128GB to 1TB across multiple form factors including 2.5-inch SATA drives, mSATA, and the PCIe-capable M.2 platform. The M600 uses Micron's newest 16nm TLC NAND, which allows the drive to hit a better cost-per-GiB than previous generation drives. The drives are built around the Marvell 88SS9189 SATA 6Gbs controller, which has been used by a variety of other SSD manufacturers as well. The M600 family of solid state drives performed relatively well throughout a battery of tests, though it couldn't quite catch Samsung's 850 Pro. Pricing for the M600 reportedly will be competitive at approximately $.45 — $.55 per GiB."
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Micron Launches First SSD Based On 16nm NAND Flash

MojoKid MojoKid writes  |  about 1 month ago

MojoKid (1002251) writes "Samsung made some waves earlier this year with the introduction of its 850 Pro family of solid state drives and the first commercial use of 3D stacked NAND Flash memory. Micron is striking back today with a lower manufacturing process geometry in conventional NAND, however, along with a new Flash technology it claims will accelerate performance more effectively than competing solutions. The new Micron M600 family of solid state drives will launch at capacities ranging from 128GB to 1TB across multiple form factors including 2.5-inch SATA drives, mSATA, and the PCIe-capable M.2 platform. The M600 uses Micron's newest 16nm TLC NAND, which allows the drive to hit a better cost-per-GiB than previous generation drives. The drives are built around the Marvell 88SS9189 SATA 6Gbs controller, which has been used by a variety of other SSD manufacturers as well. The M600 family of solid state drives performed relatively well throughout a battery of tests, though it couldn't quite catch Samsung's 850 Pro. Pricing for the M600 reportedly will be competitive at approximately $.45 — $.55 per GiB."
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Nixie Wearable Drone Camera Flies Off Your Wrist To Capture The Moment

MojoKid MojoKid writes  |  about a month ago

MojoKid (1002251) writes "Over the past couple of years, drones have become popular enough to the point where a new release doesn't excite most people. But Nixie is different. It's a drone that you wear, like a bracelet. Whenever you need to let it soar, you give it a command to unwrap, power it up, and let it go. From the consumer standpoint, the most popular use for drones is to capture some amazing footage. But what if you want to be in that footage? That's where Nixie comes in. After "setting your camera free", the drone soars around you, keeping you in its frame.Nixie is powered by Intel's Edison kit, which is both small enough and affordable enough to fit inside such a small device."
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Acer Launches First 4K Panel With NVIDIA G-Sync Technology On Board

MojoKid MojoKid writes  |  about a month ago

MojoKid (1002251) writes "Save for a smattering of relatively small, 3K and 4K laptop displays, we haven't quite gotten to the same type of pixel density on the PC platform, that is available on today's high-end ultra-mobile devices. That said, the desktop display space has really heated up as of late and 4K panels have generated a large part of the buzz. Acer just launched the first 4K display with NVIDIA G-Sync technology on board. To put it simply, G-SYNC keeps a display and the output from an NVIDIA GPU in sync, regardless of frame rates or whether or not V-Sync is enabled. Instead of the monitor controlling the timing and refreshing at say 60Hz, the timing control is transferred to the GPU. The GPU scans a frame out to the monitor and the monitor doesn't update until a frame is done drawing, in lock-step with the GPU. This method completely eliminates tearing or frame stuttering associated with synchronization anomalies of standard panels. There are still some quirks with Windows and many applications that don't always scale properly on high-DPI displays, but the situation is getting better every day. If you're a gamer in the market for a 4K display, that's primed for gaming, the Acer XB280HK is a decent new option with this technology on board, though it does come at a bit of a premium at $799 versus standard 28-inch panels."
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Euclideon Teases Photo-Realistic Voxel-Based Game Engine

MojoKid MojoKid writes  |  about a month ago

MojoKid (1002251) writes "Not many would argue that current console and PC graphics technologies still haven't reached a level of "photo-realism." However, a company by the name of Euclideon is claiming to be preparing to deliver that holy grail based on laser scanning and voxel engine-based technologies. The company has put together a six-minute video clip of its new engine, and its genuinely impressive. There's a supposed-to-be-impressive unveil around the two minute mark where the announcer declares he's showing us computer-generated graphics rather than a digital photo — something you'll probably have figured out long before that point. Euclideon's proprietary design purportedly uses a laser scanner to create a point cloud model of a real-world area. That area can then be translated into a voxel renderer and drawn by a standard GPU. Supposedly this can be done so efficiently and with such speed that there's no need for conventional load screens or enormous amounts of texture memory but rather by simply streaming data off conventional hard drives. Previously, critiques have pointed to animation as one area where the company's technique might struggle. Given the ongoing lack of a demonstrated solution for animation, it's fair to assume this would-be game-changer has some challenges still to solve. That said, some of the renderings are impressive."
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Users Report Warping Of Apple's iPhone 6 Plus And It's Not A "Feature"

MojoKid MojoKid writes  |  about a month ago

MojoKid (1002251) writes "Apple's iPhone 6 Plus packs a bevy of improvements into its phablet-sized frame — its battery life dwarfs all previous iPhones, its screen quality and resolution are excellent, it's just six ounces, and a scant 7.1mm thick. As an added bonus, according to a number of users, it has a hidden feature — it bends! And no, we don't mean it bends in a "Hey, what an awesome feature!" sort of way. More like a "Hey, the entire phone is near to snapping" kind of way. What's even more troubling is that many of the users who are reporting bent devices also claim that they were carrying it in front pockets or in a normal fashion as opposed to sitting on it directly. Either some of the iPhone 6 Plus hardware is defective (the vastly preferable option) or it's because the tests run by other venues are putting different kinds of stress on the chassis.It's not clear what the story is. Hopefully Apple will clarify in the very short term."
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Warpgate: iPhone 6 Plus Users Reporting Bent Phones From Seemingly Normal Use

MojoKid MojoKid writes  |  about a month ago

MojoKid (1002251) writes "Apple's new iPhone 6 Plus packs a bevy of improvements into its phablet-sized frame. Its battery life dwarfs all previous iPhones, its screen quality and resolution are excellent, it's just six ounces, and a scant 7.1mm thick. As an added bonus, according to a number of users, it has a hidden feature — it bends. And not in a good way, unfortunately. What's even more troubling is that many of the users who are reporting bent devices also claim that they were carrying it in front pockets or in a normal fashion as opposed to sitting on it directly. Either some of the iPhone 6 Plus hardware is defective (the vastly preferable option) or it's because these early reports illustrate that users are putting different kinds of stress on the chassis that either is or is not typically seen in normal use. Either way, it probably shouldn't be happening. It's not clear what the story is but hopefully Apple will clarify things soon and address the issue."
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