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FCC Officially Approves Change In the Definition of Broadband

Mr D from 63 Re:That doesn't sound bad (331 comments)

I have 20 mb/s down, 2 up. So I just lost my broadband. Just a little boost is required for TWC to keep me in the broadband category. Of course, they'll find a way to charge me more for it as well.

7 hours ago
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YouTube Ditches Flash For HTML5 Video By Default

Mr D from 63 Re:flash updates (224 comments)

Java will work hard to make sure you stay annoyed.

2 days ago
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Scientists Determine New Way To Untangle Proteins By Unboiling an Egg

Mr D from 63 Re:Wow .... (155 comments)

Thank you for that thorough explanation of the process. The intricate details you presented on how it works are quite well articulated.

3 days ago
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Scientists Determine New Way To Untangle Proteins By Unboiling an Egg

Mr D from 63 Re:Wow .... (155 comments)

Un-boiling an egg, the mind boggles.

I read the article, and still can't figure out what they are really doing or how they are really gonna use it, seems to be a processing technique more than a production technique. Somehow I suspect the unboiled whites are not quite the same as the original.

I guess the next step is to un-fry a chicken.

3 days ago
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Google Explains Why WebView Vulnerability Will Go Unpatched On Android 4.3

Mr D from 63 Re:Nice troll (577 comments)

Yes, 60% is very misleading, as is the intentional omission of how easy the problem is to avoid.

But, hey, why pass up a chance to bash?

3 days ago
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Google Explains Why WebView Vulnerability Will Go Unpatched On Android 4.3

Mr D from 63 Re:The solution is obvious (577 comments)

They also state that the vulnerability can be easily avoided just by using an updated browser.

3 days ago
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Omand Warns of "Ethically Worse" Spying If Unbreakable Encryption Is Allowed

Mr D from 63 Re:They better be damn sure we're not home... (390 comments)

Do you idiots seriously believe that if the government was going to target you for surveillance, and go to the length of breaking into your home in order to bug it, that they would do so while you were there????

They also have a guy set up in the abandoned house across the street.

3 days ago
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Fish Found Living Half a Mile Under Antarctic Ice

Mr D from 63 Why is this a surprise? (78 comments)

Considering all the extreme places we've found life on earth, I would actually have expected to find some.

4 days ago
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Government Recommends Cars With Smarter Brakes

Mr D from 63 Re:Not a fan (304 comments)

True, and in most cases that is just fine. I realize they are addressing the majority of situations, but sometimes you do not want to slow down when rapidly changing lanes, depending on where other vehicles are. I know, its not the most probably of situations, but I have more than once in my many years of driving encountered such conditions. In fact, I've had to accelerate to change lanes safely and avoid a car that suddenly moved in front of me after first almost running off the road.

5 days ago
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At Oxford, a Battery That's Lasted 175 Years -- So Far

Mr D from 63 Re:Interstellar missions... (211 comments)

If the thought experiment ignores a significant factor, is it better just because it is simpler?

Low humidity = low heat capacity Low heat capacity = faster cooling given a set amount of radiance (be it soil or air) which equates to high temperature swings.

Obviously, heat from the sand is lost almost entirely by radiance. I agree little is absorbed by the dry, low heat capacity air. I agree radiance is a primary factor in cooling.

But you must understand that surface characteristic play into it as well as moisture in the air. If you have ever been to a desert city where asphalt absorbs much heat during the day, you will find that even with dry air and clear skies, the surface air temperatures do not follow such drastic, rapid swings.

5 days ago
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Smartphones, Tablets and EBay Send SkyMall To Chapter 11

Mr D from 63 Re:Make Yourself Known (65 comments)

Congrats! You win three internets and Skymall gift card for your honesty.

5 days ago
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At Oxford, a Battery That's Lasted 175 Years -- So Far

Mr D from 63 Re:Interstellar missions... (211 comments)

I never said any of the poster were right or wrong, I was just elaborating on factors that were being overlooked. There are multiple factors at play, simplifying it to "just radiant cooling" is fine if you want to keep it simple, but I guarantee a higher heat capacity soil would provide more heat to the surface air for a longer period during the night if all other factors were the same. There is simply less stored heat to radiate.

The 'warmer' just below the surface is exactly what you expect from a low heat capacity, reflective soil.

5 days ago
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At Oxford, a Battery That's Lasted 175 Years -- So Far

Mr D from 63 Re:Interstellar missions... (211 comments)

Why are you so opposed to the idea of radiant cooling?

I don't understand what you are talking about. If you read what I said, the sand cool quickly because of its low heat capacity. That cooling is can be from radiant heat loss, I never said it was not. Obviously you have both factors at play.

You do realize that, Hollywood stereotypes aside, desert != sand, right?

Can't you freaking read? I specifically was talking about sand. Pay attention and don't get so defensive. Clouds = moisture in the air.. .another thing I specifically mentioned. Moisture in air retains heat. As for paying attention, if you had done so to start with I could still take you seriously.

5 days ago
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Government Recommends Cars With Smarter Brakes

Mr D from 63 Re:Not a fan (304 comments)

Not arguing your point, but it would be just as interesting to see the stats on accidents avoided. In many situations, swerving with controlled braking is more effective than braking alone or 'panic braking'. I'd hate to lose that ability to have that braking control. But I do understand the point of the proposed requirement is those that have no clue what is happening in front of them.

5 days ago
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Government Recommends Cars With Smarter Brakes

Mr D from 63 Re:I have an even better idea (304 comments)

Its hard to pre-emptively determine who is safe or not except through our driving tests, which are pretty much a joke. Even with tougher driving tests, a person would do just fine in the test when they aren't texting or allowing other distractions to take hold like the do all to often.

But, its hard to have any hope of good drivers overall when it seems that 20% of people seem to stupid to how to use a passing lane properly.

5 days ago
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Smartphones, Tablets and EBay Send SkyMall To Chapter 11

Mr D from 63 Make Yourself Known (65 comments)

OK, I've always wondered who actually has ever bought anything from Skymall. I mean, we've all looked, but who has actually done the deed?

Anyone? Don't be afraid to admit it... come out of the shadows and confess.

5 days ago
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At Oxford, a Battery That's Lasted 175 Years -- So Far

Mr D from 63 Re:Interstellar missions... (211 comments)

Without doing the research, I'd say a significant factor in desert cooling speed is the low heat retention and transfer characteristics of desert sand. Sand is low density, low heat capacity, and in the absence of moisture simply doesn't retain much energy, nor does it conduct much energy to very far below the surface, so as soon as the heat source is gone, the sand quickly cools. Many desert surface are relatively reflective, which further reduces heat absorption.

With the absence of significant surface heat radiation, then all you have is the air, generally dry and therefore low heat capacity itself, to retain the heat. Add the inevitable convection and you have rapid cooling. A big, moist forest would absorb and hold a lot of heat, and interfere with convection.

5 days ago
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Should Disney Require Its Employees To Be Vaccinated?

Mr D from 63 Re:its a tough subject (661 comments)

It is a business, not public property of course. The point is that a large swath of the public use it.

I made no analogy.

You can be pissed all you want, and you can believe they would be in the right to require vaccinations, but that doesn't mean they will force employees to vaccinate and expose themselves to the possible legal hassles and costs without a regulatory or legal requirement or at least a solid legal precedent.

Simply convince Disney not to worry about discrimination lawsuits, those that blame health issues on a forced vaccination, or those that believe their medical privacy rights are violated. It sure would be a lot easier to get Disney to do that 'right thing' if it were clearly backed by the law. That would be the easy way to get it to happen, IMO.

Now, what to do about all those vaccinated customers......

about a week ago
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U.S. Gas Stations Vulnerable To Internet Attacks

Mr D from 63 Re:Once more (100 comments)

RTFA, they are not internet connected. They can be access over the internet if someone takes a device to the pump, connects to the serial interface, and connected to a gateway device to the internet.

about a week ago
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Should Disney Require Its Employees To Be Vaccinated?

Mr D from 63 Re:its a tough subject (661 comments)

Well, I assumed you were talking in practical, real world terms, where risk and exposure are realities that drive corporate decisions rather than idealistic and generalized logic. I wasn't making a philosophical statement, but rather pointing to how best it should be approached to achieve an end goal of actually requiring vaccinations.

But, through all that and your odd attempt to twist it to make yourself feel better, my original point is well backed by my statements. It should be public policy, thus enabling the companies to do it.

about a week ago

Submissions

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Cutting the Cord? Time Warner loses 184,000 TV subscribers in one quarter.

Mr D from 63 Mr D from 63 writes  |  about 2 months ago

Mr D from 63 (3395377) writes "Time Warner Cable’s results have been buoyed recently by higher subscriber numbers for broadband Internet service. In the latest period, however, Time Warner Cable lost 18,000 overall residential customer relationships.

The addition of 92,000 residential high-speed data customers was offset by 184,000 fewer residential video customers in the quarter. Triple play customers fell by 24,000, while residential voice additions were 14,000."

Link to Original Source
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Does Lockheed Martin Really Have a Breakthrough Fusion Machine?

Mr D from 63 Mr D from 63 writes  |  about 3 months ago

Mr D from 63 (3395377) writes "Some followup to the recent /. article on this topic;

Lockheed Martin’s announcement last week that it had secretly developed a promising design for a compact nuclear fusion reactor has met with excitement but also skepticism over the basic feasibility of its approach.

Ian Hutchinson, a professor of nuclear science and engineering at MIT, says he was only able to comment on what Lockheed has released—some pictures, diagrams, and commentary, which can be found here. “Based on that, as far as I can tell, they aren’t paying attention to the basic physics of magnetic-confinement fusion energy. And so I’m highly skeptical that they have anything interesting to offer,” he says...

"

Link to Original Source
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Netflix Says Ultra-HD Content Costs More, So Subscribers Will Pay More

Mr D from 63 Mr D from 63 writes  |  about 4 months ago

Mr D from 63 (3395377) writes "From the article; "A higher-resolution, 4K stream from Netflix (NFLX) will cost more. The company has boosted its monthly price for streaming ultrahigh-definition television and movies to $11.99 per month, citing the higher expenses associated with that content. In May, Netflix announced that its original series, such as House of Cards, would be available to stream in the 4K format, which offers roughly four times the resolution of current high-def TVs.""
Link to Original Source
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Nereus Deep Sea Vehicle Lost

Mr D from 63 Mr D from 63 writes  |  about 9 months ago

Mr D from 63 (3395377) writes "On Saturday, May 10, 2014, at 2 p.m. local time (10 p.m. Friday EDT), the hybrid remotely operated vehicle Nereus was confirmed lost at 9,990 meters (6.2 miles) depth in the Kermadec Trench northeast of New Zealand. The unmanned vehicle was working as part of a mission to explore the ocean’s hadal region from 6,000 to nearly 11,000 meters deep. Scientists say a portion of it likely imploded under pressure as great as 16,000 pounds per square inch."
Link to Original Source
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SEC Releases Long-Awaited Rules on Crowdfunding

Mr D from 63 Mr D from 63 writes  |  about a year ago

Mr D from 63 (3395377) writes "The Securities and Exchange Commission announced rules that will make it legal for entrepreneurs and startups to raise money by selling pieces of their company to everyday, mom-and-pop investors.

The proposed rules were released this morning and the Commission voted to adopt them. The rules will now be available for public comment for 90 days before a final set is drafted and adopted.

Proposed rules include;
1. Entrepreneurs could raise $1 million per year.
2. The amount individuals could invest would be capped depending on their net worth.
3. Equity in a company must be held for one year
4. Transactions must be supervised by an SEC-registered intermediary
5. Only U.S.-based companies would be eligible to crowdfund
6. Financial disclosure requirements. Companies that participate in online equity crowdfunding would need to disclose who are their primary officers and directors and anyone who owns more than 20 percent of the company."

Link to Original Source

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