Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

We are sorry to see you leave - Beta is different and we value the time you took to try it out. Before you decide to go, please take a look at some value-adds for Beta and learn more about it. Thank you for reading Slashdot, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

In a Self-Driving Future, We May Not Even Want To Own Cars

Mr D from 63 Re:Thank You Jerry (301 comments)

Yeah, its so insightful, isn't it?

49 minutes ago
top

In a Self-Driving Future, We May Not Even Want To Own Cars

Mr D from 63 Thank You Jerry (301 comments)

Your wild guess about the future is as good as any.

11 hours ago
top

Extreme Shrimp May Hold Clues To Alien Life On Europa

Mr D from 63 In Reverse (67 comments)

I find it much more probable that life begins in milder, friendlier conditions and then adapts over time to harsher environments. Of course, everything is relative.

yesterday
top

Google's Project Loon Can Now Launch Up To 20 Balloons Per Day, Fly 10x Longer

Mr D from 63 Re:No hot air (112 comments)

This text does not tell what the balloon is inflated with

Maybe hype?

yesterday
top

Google's Project Loon Can Now Launch Up To 20 Balloons Per Day, Fly 10x Longer

Mr D from 63 Re:No hot air (112 comments)

Try some critical thinking on the hot air idea. Look at the pictures as well, they clearly are filling the balloons from a compressed gas source.

yesterday
top

Google's Project Loon Can Now Launch Up To 20 Balloons Per Day, Fly 10x Longer

Mr D from 63 Re:Helium shortage (112 comments)

I think the engineering problem with filling it is more akin to cutting the feed at the right point more than anything to not rupture the vessel that is being filled.

Not really a problem. They likely just release a set volume of gas at a given temperature.

yesterday
top

Google's Project Loon Can Now Launch Up To 20 Balloons Per Day, Fly 10x Longer

Mr D from 63 Re:No hot air (112 comments)

Just think how much energy it would take to maintain the hot air. Its simply not practical.

yesterday
top

Lessons Learned From Google's Green Energy Bust

Mr D from 63 Re:This is a good reminder for all technocrats (215 comments)

But everything is justifiable by blaming all our problems on libertarians & conservatives. So, please, play along. Don't make us consider reality, that just complicates the matter.

3 days ago
top

As Amazon Grows In Seattle, Pay Equity For Women Declines

Mr D from 63 Re:Bullshit Stats. (482 comments)

Pay comparisons should be broken down by experience & job level, and possibly age, otherwise they are skewed.

3 days ago
top

The Software Big Oil's PR Firm Uses To "Convert Average Citizens"

Mr D from 63 Re:What? (101 comments)

Exactly, its not like the renewables lobby doesn't use similar PR tactics, or any other lobby for that matter.

4 days ago
top

What the US Can Learn From Canada's Internet Policy

Mr D from 63 Re:Was impressed until.. (142 comments)

Still, it won't do squat to encourage competition.

5 days ago
top

What the US Can Learn From Canada's Internet Policy

Mr D from 63 Re:Was impressed until.. (142 comments)

That approach makes more sense than some that think simply declaring US ISPs as utilities will be a step forward.

about a week ago
top

What the US Can Learn From Canada's Internet Policy

Mr D from 63 Re:Was impressed until.. (142 comments)

And what regulation, exactly, enabled that competition? Simply declaring ISPs as utilities will certainly not encourage that type of competition.

about a week ago
top

What the US Can Learn From Canada's Internet Policy

Mr D from 63 Re:Was impressed until.. (142 comments)

Regulation can also inhibit the emergence of competition.

about a week ago
top

What the US Can Learn From Canada's Internet Policy

Mr D from 63 Re:Change Last Mile (142 comments)

My Solution: Upgrade the Municipality to FIOS service to a COLO facility. Bring Fiber to each home (one time bond build out) and have several providers offer service out of the COLO. Net Neutrality issues go away, you can pay for exactly what you want/need. Bandwidth issues become points for competition

Certainly a much better scenario than regulating as a utility and potentially hurting the chances of competition arising.

about a week ago
top

What the US Can Learn From Canada's Internet Policy

Mr D from 63 Re:Was impressed until.. (142 comments)

Sounds like you are benefiting more from the competition than from the regulation.

about a week ago
top

Military Laser/Radio Tech Proposed As Alternative To Laying Costly Fiber Cable

Mr D from 63 Re:Lasers and deformable mirrors arnt expensive (150 comments)

simple enough to seize with Imminent Domain

No, it is anything but simple enough. It is often a legal tie up, and can be very expensive. Even if right of way easements exist, they often not efficient or desirable routes, or even continuous over a long distance.

There is a real need for hi speed technologies like this in rural areas. LOS has its issues, but if there is a reliable, cost effective solution, then there is certainly a market.

about a week ago

Submissions

top

Cutting the Cord? Time Warner loses 184,000 TV subscribers in one quarter.

Mr D from 63 Mr D from 63 writes  |  about three weeks ago

Mr D from 63 (3395377) writes "Time Warner Cable’s results have been buoyed recently by higher subscriber numbers for broadband Internet service. In the latest period, however, Time Warner Cable lost 18,000 overall residential customer relationships.

The addition of 92,000 residential high-speed data customers was offset by 184,000 fewer residential video customers in the quarter. Triple play customers fell by 24,000, while residential voice additions were 14,000."

Link to Original Source
top

Does Lockheed Martin Really Have a Breakthrough Fusion Machine?

Mr D from 63 Mr D from 63 writes  |  about a month ago

Mr D from 63 (3395377) writes "Some followup to the recent /. article on this topic;

Lockheed Martin’s announcement last week that it had secretly developed a promising design for a compact nuclear fusion reactor has met with excitement but also skepticism over the basic feasibility of its approach.

Ian Hutchinson, a professor of nuclear science and engineering at MIT, says he was only able to comment on what Lockheed has released—some pictures, diagrams, and commentary, which can be found here. “Based on that, as far as I can tell, they aren’t paying attention to the basic physics of magnetic-confinement fusion energy. And so I’m highly skeptical that they have anything interesting to offer,” he says...

"

Link to Original Source
top

Netflix Says Ultra-HD Content Costs More, So Subscribers Will Pay More

Mr D from 63 Mr D from 63 writes  |  about a month ago

Mr D from 63 (3395377) writes "From the article; "A higher-resolution, 4K stream from Netflix (NFLX) will cost more. The company has boosted its monthly price for streaming ultrahigh-definition television and movies to $11.99 per month, citing the higher expenses associated with that content. In May, Netflix announced that its original series, such as House of Cards, would be available to stream in the 4K format, which offers roughly four times the resolution of current high-def TVs.""
Link to Original Source
top

Nereus Deep Sea Vehicle Lost

Mr D from 63 Mr D from 63 writes  |  about 6 months ago

Mr D from 63 (3395377) writes "On Saturday, May 10, 2014, at 2 p.m. local time (10 p.m. Friday EDT), the hybrid remotely operated vehicle Nereus was confirmed lost at 9,990 meters (6.2 miles) depth in the Kermadec Trench northeast of New Zealand. The unmanned vehicle was working as part of a mission to explore the ocean’s hadal region from 6,000 to nearly 11,000 meters deep. Scientists say a portion of it likely imploded under pressure as great as 16,000 pounds per square inch."
Link to Original Source
top

SEC Releases Long-Awaited Rules on Crowdfunding

Mr D from 63 Mr D from 63 writes  |  about a year ago

Mr D from 63 (3395377) writes "The Securities and Exchange Commission announced rules that will make it legal for entrepreneurs and startups to raise money by selling pieces of their company to everyday, mom-and-pop investors.

The proposed rules were released this morning and the Commission voted to adopt them. The rules will now be available for public comment for 90 days before a final set is drafted and adopted.

Proposed rules include;
1. Entrepreneurs could raise $1 million per year.
2. The amount individuals could invest would be capped depending on their net worth.
3. Equity in a company must be held for one year
4. Transactions must be supervised by an SEC-registered intermediary
5. Only U.S.-based companies would be eligible to crowdfund
6. Financial disclosure requirements. Companies that participate in online equity crowdfunding would need to disclose who are their primary officers and directors and anyone who owns more than 20 percent of the company."

Link to Original Source

Journals

Mr D from 63 has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?