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Comments

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It's Easy To Hack Traffic Lights

Mr D from 63 Re:Welcome to the Information Age! (129 comments)

You can have vendor lock with or without standards. Standards can often contribute to vendor lock.

Why do I think there are standards? For one, the article refers to them, albeit vaguely. For two, purchasing standards or requirements for commonplace items such as stoplights typically fall under some type of code/standard/requirement system, and that makes sense when you want to make sure equipment is similar throughout a large system or state. Be that for vendor lock, or simple management simplicity, you choose, that part is irrelevant to my point.

5 hours ago
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Students From States With Faster Internet Tend To Have Higher Test Scores

Mr D from 63 Re:sorry (151 comments)

If they raise their test scores, we should give them faster internet as a reward.

8 hours ago
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It's Easy To Hack Traffic Lights

Mr D from 63 Re:Welcome to the Information Age! (129 comments)

And how exactly would a simple password result in a higher price?

That completely misses the point, even if adding a simple password were the answer. If a standard is not sufficient, it should be changed. Don't blame the buyer or the vendor. For things like traffic lights, you want them all to be as alike as possible to save costs, be it purchasing requirements, maintenance and troubleshooting, and operation. That is why there are standards and why they are followed and why there are costs associated with deviating from the standard.

9 hours ago
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It's Easy To Hack Traffic Lights

Mr D from 63 Re:Welcome to the Information Age! (129 comments)

Most of those who do the purchasing are required to enforce the standards. Deviating, even with the intent of improvement, can bring unintended consequences and blame. For instance, add security, then all of the sudden maintenance access doesn't work because its different, complaints and blame fly. Just one possible example of many things that can happen, thus they have standards and are required to use them.

12 hours ago
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It's Easy To Hack Traffic Lights

Mr D from 63 Re:Welcome to the Information Age! (129 comments)

From TFA,

In fact, the most upsetting passage in the entire paper is the dismissive response issued by the traffic controller vendor when the research team presented its findings. According to the paper, the vendor responsible stated that it "has followed the accepted industry standard and it is that standard which does not include security."

Don't blame the vendor, blame the standard. The vendor that includes security in his bid will have a higher price and lose to the vendor that doesn't.

12 hours ago
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FCC Warned Not To Take Actions a Republican-Led FCC Would Dislike

Mr D from 63 Re: yeah (329 comments)

I agree municipalities should, in general, have the right to install utilities, broadband included. But I also like the idea of state control more than federal control, as it typically promotes more models that can be compared. In the case of municipal broadband, there are a range of successes and failures, including some big money losers. If State money is being used, then the States need to be able to determine the rules. If you don't want State level control, then let the local municipalities & citizens pay for the broadband utility build if they want, but they should also pay the debt if they fail and not ask for a State or Federal bail out.

13 hours ago
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Cause of Global Warming 'Hiatus' Found Deep In the Atlantic

Mr D from 63 Re:Wait (351 comments)

This guy is, understandably, overstating the prior uncertainty in order to promote his own research.

Is he? http://articles.latimes.com/20...

Xie has argued that the hiatus is the result of heat absorption by the Pacific Ocean — a little-understood, naturally occurring process that repeats itself every few decades. Xie and his colleagues presented the idea in a study published last month in the prestigious journal Nature.

The theory, which is gaining adherents, remains unproved by actual observation. Surface temperature records date to the late 1800s, but measurements of deep water temperature began only in the 1960s, so there just isn't enough data to chart the long-term patterns, Xie said.


This was just last year from a respected climate scientist who apparently was on the right track. Did we get all that needed data in just one year? Logic doesn't hold. They may have firmed up the theory, it is still a work in progress,. I think a large food source for the skeptics is the constant minimization or even complete dismissal of the uncertainties by many who report the science. Science reporting sucks so bad these days that anyone can conclude anything they want.

yesterday
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Cause of Global Warming 'Hiatus' Found Deep In the Atlantic

Mr D from 63 Re:Every week there's a new explanation of the hia (351 comments)

Scepticism says: the climate change model is incorrect, we need to change the model. Denial says: the climate change model is incorrect, therefore climate change is wrong LA LA LA LA LA I cant hear you.

I agree. The problem is that quite often skeptics, that fit your exact description above, are labeled deniers.

yesterday
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Experimental Drug Stops Ebola-like Infection

Mr D from 63 Re:Here's What Bugs Me (51 comments)

Yeah, and the nerve of him using his talents and going to help all those people in the name of his god. Just trying to make others look bad.

yesterday
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Study: Ad-Free Internet Would Cost Everyone $230-a-Year

Mr D from 63 Re:That's it? (537 comments)

Good point, I'm sure the cost of all that coordination was completely left out of the estimate.

yesterday
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Study: Ad-Free Internet Would Cost Everyone $230-a-Year

Mr D from 63 Re:$230 (537 comments)

I don't need an Ad free internet and I'm not sure I'd want one. I would like an Annoying and/or Slow Ad free internet. Pop up, holding pages, overlays, etc all must be brought under control. A method to identify and suppress the annoying ads would be a boon to all the "good" advertisers. Those that slow loading times to a crawl must also be eliminated.

I think some sites should try direct sponsorships with a single or a few corporations. Load their banner, use their colors, and merge it with the site design to keep it a pleasant, quick loading experience. Ad services have run out of control.

yesterday
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Study: Ad-Free Internet Would Cost Everyone $230-a-Year

Mr D from 63 Re:That's it? (537 comments)

Unfortunately, this whole scheme requires someone to define what an ad is and get participation from very single website on the planet. If Coke wants to sponsor a site and has a banner in the header that originates from that site's server, how would that be stopped?

yesterday
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National Science Foundation Awards $20 Million For Cloud Computing Experiments

Mr D from 63 Re:What do they mean by cloud? (25 comments)

Whenever these kinds of stories come up I really wonder what they mean by "cloud computing"

Cloud computing got popular when thin client got boring. These marketing generalizations always drive me crazy. If you have an on-line storage or backup service, just call it that. If it is on-line music streaming service, web based office tools, whatever just call it what it is. Otherwise, you just piss off those that get it and confuse those that don't.

yesterday
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Solar Plant Sets Birds On Fire As They Fly Overhead

Mr D from 63 Re:god dammit. (504 comments)

I meant as a deployable technology for useful and cost effective electrical generation. Yes, there have been several plants built and run, but none of them achieve the kind of cost effective and reliability results that would result in wide spread deployment, such as we have with Solar PV and Wind. Of course, in essence, all these sources have been around for a long time.

You won't see CSP electrical plants popping up all around like wind and solar any time soon.

2 days ago
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Helsinki Aims To Obviate Private Cars

Mr D from 63 Re:Legal challenges (274 comments)

I think they will see ripe opportunities make much more money than they do.

2 days ago
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Solar Plant Sets Birds On Fire As They Fly Overhead

Mr D from 63 Re:Huge bird and fish kills (504 comments)

Actually, to be more precise, the Mother Jones bird kill article fails on almost all fronts of science.

1) starts with the presumption that all changes in bird population are due to Fukushima accident, but makes zero attempts to justify that logic, its basis, or evidence to support that theory.
2) ignores completely the habitat impact of the tsunami
3) ignores completely the impact of human evacuation. No bird feeders, no bird baths, no trash (common food source), no fish cleaning, etc.
4) states that it was breeding season when the tsunami and accident occurred, but completely ignores that aspect of tsunami impact.
5) does not cite any control study in any other coastal areas of Japan
6) does not cite any existing base science that would support a radiological aspect as being a cause.


The article also leaps to the conclusion that there are only two possible scenarios that could apply;
1) The Fukushima birds have never experienced radiation of this intensity before and may therefore be especially sensitive to radioactive contaminants.
2) Overall more birds declined at Chernobyl because it's been more than two decades since that disaster, during which many species have basically disappeared from the most contaminated regions.

That is what get's pushed as science by the agenda driven, and accepted by the ignorant. To be fair, this is just an ignorant article that tries to interpret other's work, speaking to an audience that is willing to accept it. Official details of an actual sanctioned study would likely be more useful.

2 days ago

Submissions

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Nereus Deep Sea Vehicle Lost

Mr D from 63 Mr D from 63 writes  |  about 3 months ago

Mr D from 63 (3395377) writes "On Saturday, May 10, 2014, at 2 p.m. local time (10 p.m. Friday EDT), the hybrid remotely operated vehicle Nereus was confirmed lost at 9,990 meters (6.2 miles) depth in the Kermadec Trench northeast of New Zealand. The unmanned vehicle was working as part of a mission to explore the ocean’s hadal region from 6,000 to nearly 11,000 meters deep. Scientists say a portion of it likely imploded under pressure as great as 16,000 pounds per square inch."
Link to Original Source
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SEC Releases Long-Awaited Rules on Crowdfunding

Mr D from 63 Mr D from 63 writes  |  about 9 months ago

Mr D from 63 (3395377) writes "The Securities and Exchange Commission announced rules that will make it legal for entrepreneurs and startups to raise money by selling pieces of their company to everyday, mom-and-pop investors.

The proposed rules were released this morning and the Commission voted to adopt them. The rules will now be available for public comment for 90 days before a final set is drafted and adopted.

Proposed rules include;
1. Entrepreneurs could raise $1 million per year.
2. The amount individuals could invest would be capped depending on their net worth.
3. Equity in a company must be held for one year
4. Transactions must be supervised by an SEC-registered intermediary
5. Only U.S.-based companies would be eligible to crowdfund
6. Financial disclosure requirements. Companies that participate in online equity crowdfunding would need to disclose who are their primary officers and directors and anyone who owns more than 20 percent of the company."

Link to Original Source

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