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How Sony, Intel, and Unix Made Apple's Mac a PC Competitor

Mr_Wisenheimer Re:Lol... (284 comments)

Too bad it is such a pain to actually get *NIX software installed and running on OS-X.

You can poke fun at the stability of the Linux desktop all you want, but Linux package management for distro-managed libraries is a breeze. On OS-X it is like pulling teeth from a hungry tiger.

yesterday
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How Sony, Intel, and Unix Made Apple's Mac a PC Competitor

Mr_Wisenheimer OS-X cost $499 more than Linux (284 comments)

That is a fact too. Linux also works much better as a *NIX development environment and you can run it on pretty much any hardware you already have.

Also, just as a hardware point of comparison, a Mac Mini is almost 200% more expensive than a compatible Intel NUC and about infinite times less upgradable.

yesterday
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How Sony, Intel, and Unix Made Apple's Mac a PC Competitor

Mr_Wisenheimer OSX is a hammer without a handle (284 comments)

Sure, a hammer without a handle can, with enough work, do pretty much any job a proper hammer can do, but it is a pain in the tukis. And, you can always take the time to build a proper handle for the broken hammer, at which point the tool is no longer crippled, but that does not change the fact that you were given the hammer in a crippled state.

OS-X as Unix is a similar situation. Given enough work, you can get tools designed for Unix to run on any system, including Windows. The question is, how much trouble do you want to go through? Compared to Linux, Mac package managers for Unix-like tools are pretty pathetic. They are difficult to install, difficult to use, and even when they do work, they are cumbersome.

Take my experience installing a simple program, the KDE text editor KATE.

KDE provides binary installation packages for Windows. Getting them installed and getting Kate up and running was relatively painless. You did not even need to install a Unix-like environment such as CYGWIN.

On Ubuntu, you can install KATE with a simple "apt-get install" command. All the dependencies are correctly handled and the program just works.

On OS-X, getting FINK running took at least an hour. It took hours to figure out how to properly install KATE (unlike Windows and Linux, the dependencies were not handled automatically). Then, once I finally got everything downloaded, it took hours to build on a 12-core system. After building, it still did not work. After several more hours Googling to figure out why, I just gave up and suggested getting rid of OS-X and installing Linux or Windows.

OS-X is a hammer without a handle. It technically still is Unix, just like a hammer-head technically is a hammer. It is just badly crippled and requires inordinate amounts of research, trial and error, or experience to use as a proper Unix box.

yesterday
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NASA's HI-SEAS Project Results Suggests a Women-Only Mars Crew

Mr_Wisenheimer Re:Women prefer male bosses (396 comments)

No, it is not a "survey conducted by Gallup." It is an article about a Gallup phone survey whose results you misrepresented.

Your cognitive dissonance is just incredible. Juxtapose one survey of women in one country that shows that 61% of women prefer female bosses or do not prefer bosses of one gender or another with your statement that, "it's quite clear women prefer male bosses." In fact, the survey shows that, among those surveyed, the majority of women did not prefer male bosses.

I'm just trying to wrap my head around the enormity of the chasm between your evidence and your conclusion.

2 days ago
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The Classic Control Panel In Windows May Be Gone

Mr_Wisenheimer Re:This looks familiar (347 comments)

That's one of the most frustrating things about OSX, is that they try to make it as difficult as possible to actually make meaningful modifications to your system.

Microsoft isn't quite as libertine as Linux's, "if you don't like our billion options, then compile your own version of KDE or Gnome," (unless you are the US government or another big contract holder with access to MS source code), but it has always been power-user and system-administrator friendly by giving straightforward tools to micro-manage system settings that were just a step or two behind the "friendly" interface.

We'll see if that changes in Windows 10. I doubt it, but you never know.

2 days ago
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The Classic Control Panel In Windows May Be Gone

Mr_Wisenheimer Re:Just keep it off the servers.... (347 comments)

Yeah, until I learned that you can just go straight to the traditional control panel interface and skip through the tablet-PC nonsense.

I don't know that the old way is necessarily "better" from a user-interface point of view, but certainly long-time windows power users and system administrators prefer it and it seems very contrary to Microsoft's philosophy of "legacy-forever" to remove it completely.

2 days ago
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More Eye Candy Coming To Windows 10

Mr_Wisenheimer Re:how pretty (209 comments)

Ignorance means "lack of knowledge". If you are claiming that my views are based on lack of knowledge about recent builds of Linux desktop, then you are claiming that I am ignorant and that my opinion is based upon ignorance.

Everyone has different sets of knowledge and experience. Rather than actually trying to learn about mine (such as asking, "what experience do you base you opinions upon") you summarily concluded that my opinion must be based upon my ignorance. It is profound superciliousness to believe that the only possible explanation for someone having a different opinion than you is their ignorance, especially when you have not even bothered to explore the basis of their opinion.

As for VMWARE, I think they are one of the few companies that produce VM software which fully supports 3D acceleration. The primary problem I had was related to newer builds of KDE working correctly with VMware's Open-GL drivers (for things such as desktop effects). It also seems to have some trouble in other Linux applications which use 3D acceleration. I don't really think the problem is on the driver end, since VMware provides the proper drivers. The problem is on the open-source community doing quality-assurance testing to ensure the drivers work properly, which is somewhat understandable, because it is not like Microsoft, which has the money to do proper quality-assurance for VMware's drivers and only has a handful of Windows configurations to support. Other visualization environments such as Virtual Box and Microsoft's Hypervisor have limited or only experimental support for full 3D acceleration, so I don't think it would be such an issue since Linux simply won't use 3D acceleration if it is not available in the virtualized environment.

I tend to agree with you about OS-X, but it is widely used in certain fields of science and most of them seem to like it just fine, so even though I prefer a combination of Windows and Linux, I also know that I am in the minority and I understand why most users prefer OS-X, even though there is a steep curve to actually get it set up properly for technical and scientific computing, but once you get it set up, you have a single environment that can run not only open source, but a big chunk of the most popular commercial software (Word, Excel, Outlook, Onenote, Mathematica, Matlab, IDL, Photoshop, and quite a few other major commercial programs).

3 days ago
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More Eye Candy Coming To Windows 10

Mr_Wisenheimer Re:how pretty (209 comments)

Yes, the only possible explanation for me having an opinion that differs from you is that I am ignorant.

As a matter of fact, I have extensively used and continue to use Linux. Every time I have tried to setup Linux as a desktop environment, it has been extremely problematic. Kubuntu, for instance, will not even properly initialize the graphics drivers for my laptop, so it is completely unusable. In the past, any desktop installation of Linux I have created suffered from serious driver and stability problems compared to Windows.

As a result, I do most of my Linux work through SSHing into a Linux server from Windows. When that is insufficient, I have a Linux VM that I use. Luckily, the VM drivers are well-supported by Linux (unlike real hardware), but even still, getting KDE working properly under VMWARE took hours of research and tweaking (and it still is not 100% stable compared to running Windows in a VM).

On my laptop, I installed CYGWIN as an alternative. It has support for most of the basic open source packages that I use out of the box and the more esoteric tools are not usually much harder to install under CYGWIN than they are under Linux (and interestingly enough, the KDE development environment was much easier to install under Windows than OS-X).

Even though Linux is ostensibly easier to get open source software set up on than OSX, when I was in school, most of my professors had switched to OSX (even those that held out for a while using separate Windows and Solaris boxes) for their workstations and laptops, because the overall ease of use of OS-X compared to Linux is worth the pain it takes to get open-source packages set-up properly, plus it can run a large percentage of the most popular commercial scientific and business applications that Windows can.

I'm not an OS-X fan, but I completely understand why it beats Linux so handedly these days as an end-user technical computing environment for academic research (obviously, other than some Windows servers to handle email and whatnot and a handful of institutions that have switched to Windows high performance computing clusters, Linux is gaining grounds as environments for distributed computing or centralized servers).

3 days ago
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More Eye Candy Coming To Windows 10

Mr_Wisenheimer Re:how pretty (209 comments)

Most of the Linux desktop evangelists have quietly switched to OSX or sewn their lips shut. There are still a few of them around.

The Steambox is coming out next year though, so that's something.

Also, when everything is working correctly, the Linux desktop is actually a pretty pleasant experience these days, so there's always that.

4 days ago
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NASA's HI-SEAS Project Results Suggests a Women-Only Mars Crew

Mr_Wisenheimer Re:Women prefer male bosses (396 comments)

Um, that is not a "study" you linked to. It is an article about an anonymous survey which shows that 39% of women surveyed prefer male bosses and 61% prefer women or don't care. Your source does not even back-up your conclusion. A minority of women in one anonymous phone survey preferred male bosses.

And there are thousands of nightmare tales about all male workplaces (just ask anyone who has served in the military).

4 days ago
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More Eye Candy Coming To Windows 10

Mr_Wisenheimer I'm fairly certain you have that option. (209 comments)

Even if you don't, you should be able to download it and install it as a theme. Windows is pretty customizable. The desktop effects are under advanced computer properties and the theme is under personalization. You can also turn Aero glass off in the power management menu.

4 days ago
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More Eye Candy Coming To Windows 10

Mr_Wisenheimer Re:how pretty (209 comments)

Well, scientists for one. It might explain why so many of them have switched to OSX as their *NIX of choice. I remember a lot of Linux desktop managers struggled with doing basic things like properly rendering Mathematica and allowing it to accelerate graphics with open GL whereas on OSX and Windows, it just "worked" pretty much 99.9% of the time.

Linux itself (the actual kernel) is very stable, maybe even more stable than the base Windows NT kernel. But as a desktop operating system? There's a reason why most people shell out good money for OSX or Windows, and it is not just because they look pretty (which many Linux desktops do these days as well).

4 days ago
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The Woman Who Should Have Been the First Female Astronaut

Mr_Wisenheimer Re:Eh (200 comments)

Yeah, I remember how the United States surrendered to the Japanese when the first woman was killed at Perl Harbor.

I also remember when New York City shut down its subway system back at the turn of the century when the first woman was killed by a subway train.

And remember the government program to build interstate highways across the US? Shut down in its first 100 miles after the first female was killed in a freeway accident.

4 days ago
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In UK, Internet Trolls Could Face Two Years In Jail

Mr_Wisenheimer Re:Trolls are the lowest form of life. . . (487 comments)

No, I rightly chose my vocabulary.

My phrase "near absolute" in context to the rest of my writings could be interpreted in many different ways. I clarified what I meant. The fact that you are still stuck on debating the semantics of my original post demonstrates you have nothing of actual value to contribute to the conversation.

4 days ago
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In UK, Internet Trolls Could Face Two Years In Jail

Mr_Wisenheimer Re:Trolls are the lowest form of life. . . (487 comments)

The right to swing firsts was an analogy made by Zechariah Chafee. The point is, no man has absolute rights or absolute liberties. They end when another person is substantially harmed or the rights of another person infringed upon.

Also, you really want a society where it is legal to give false testimony to a police officer or a court? Maybe someone who doesn't like you makes up a story about you, gets others to go along with it and gets you thrown into prison. After all, there is no disincentive to lying, because they cannot get in trouble for filing false police reports, obstruction of justice, or perjury in a world where freedom of speech is an absolute right.

How about someone who purposefully defrauds you out of thousands of dollars. Normally, they could be thrown in prison, but in a world where freedom of speech is absolute, oral and written contracts are meaningless, because I have the freedom to say or write anything I want without any criminal repercussions.

5 days ago
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In UK, Internet Trolls Could Face Two Years In Jail

Mr_Wisenheimer Re:Trolls are the lowest form of life. . . (487 comments)

Limits on freedom of expression are a balance between the liberties of one individual and the rights and liberties of another. Most people would agree that the right to swing my first ends where another man's nose begins. Likewise, most people would agree that my freedom of religion ends when I begin sacrificing virgins, that my freedom of expression ends when my performance art involves blowing up a dam, et cetera.

Is it my right to lie? Not when it involves fraud. Is it my right to give false testimony in court or to a police officer? Absolutely not. We recognize that there are limits to the freedom of expression. No right is completely absolute.

5 days ago
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In UK, Internet Trolls Could Face Two Years In Jail

Mr_Wisenheimer Re:Trolls are the lowest form of life. . . (487 comments)

I'm not "walking back" from anything. While I understand your first post may have been a response engendered by a legitimately different interpretation of what I meant by, "near absolute", I did clarify what point and at this point you are purposefully arguing against a strawman you created rather than my actual argument.

Also, your comment about "natural rights" is not pedantry. It is sophistry. The Supreme Court and the populace recognizes that freedom of speech is a constitutional right. Trying to impose your vocabulary on others by "correcting" them is nothing more than a superciliousness born not out of actual superior knowledge but out of ignorance and self-delusion.

    Since the Chaplinsky v. New Hampshire, the Supreme Court has pretty consistently overturned future cases that relied on the doctrine, such as in Gooding v. Wilson. The court has not come right out and completely overturned the doctrine, but the high court has consistently not upheld it as valid in such a wide variety of cases that it is pretty close to effectively dead, the latest being the cases against the Westboro Baptist Church, whose members would shout obscenities at the relatives of service-members killed in combat.

5 days ago
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In UK, Internet Trolls Could Face Two Years In Jail

Mr_Wisenheimer Re:Trolls are the lowest form of life. . . (487 comments)

In my opinion, the US courts are quite good at this. That is why I hold them up as a standard.

Nobody sane wants absolute freedom of expression. Libel laws, as they exist in the US, in my opinion strike the right balance between allowing someone recourse when their lives or businesses are utterly decimated by vicious lies spread by others while ensuring that it is very, very difficult to abuse the libel laws to stifle legitimate freedom of expression.

5 days ago
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In UK, Internet Trolls Could Face Two Years In Jail

Mr_Wisenheimer Re:Trolls are the lowest form of life. . . (487 comments)

The differences in British and American libel laws would make such an interpretation tricky.

In the US, impersonating someone for the purpose of satire is generally well-protected. Furthermore, in order to prove a libel case, the plaintiff not only has to prove that the defendant intended to defame him for not legitimate purpose other than to cause him harm, but they also have to prove that they suffered real damages (an example might be a restaurant owner who falsely accused a competitor of having a rat infestation in a successful attempt to drive business to his establishment). Under US law, the plaintiff would have to prove not only that the accusation was falsely made to run off his business, but that it did indeed result in proven pecuniary losses.

By contrast, the British system essentially puts the burden on someone accused of libel to prove their innocence and does not have the same strict standards the US does.

It probably would not fly as criminal law in the US (because libel cannot be criminalized to the best of my understanding of the court's interpretation of the first amendment), but under the British system, there seem to be very few restraints on the government making unpopular speech criminal, so in theory, even someone who makes a satirical impersonation could be subject to civil or criminal penalties, which should give anyone living in the UK pause.

5 days ago
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In UK, Internet Trolls Could Face Two Years In Jail

Mr_Wisenheimer Re:Trolls are the lowest form of life. . . (487 comments)

Your response demonstrates that you failed to read and understand my points. There will always be limits to freedom of speech, but those limits are much more restrained in the US than the UK, just to go down the list:

1) Libel in the US is a civil matter (not criminal) and requires meeting very strict standards of proof, including proving both that the defendant knowingly made a false statement for the express purpose of defaming the plaintiff (and not as a matter of comedic, satirical, or other protected purpose) and that the plaintiff actually suffered real damages as a result. Libel cases in the US are very difficult to win.. By contrast, the British libel laws are so unfavorable to the defendant's right of free speech that many US States such as California have passed laws to protect their residents from action in British courts.

2) Inciting others to violence is only illegal if there is an imminent threat of lawless action, such as a mob gathered around someone's house who you incite to storm inside. By contrast, British law allows someone to be imprisoned simply for making disrespectful statements about someone or some group that might, at some hypothetical point in the future, incite others to commit violence against.

3) The fighting words doctrine has largely been overturned and, in any case, is not a criminal act in itself, merely recognized as a mitigating defense to a claim of assault or battery.

4) Disturbing the peace is not a charge that can be used as a workaround to target someone's freedom of expression. The courts have ruled on this time and again.

5) Emotional distress is damage in a civil case. It has nothing to do with freedom of speech.

I'm not going to even bother than the rest, because you clearly missed the point. No right is absolute, but the US Supreme Court guards the freedom of expression in the US much more fiercely than European Courts do.

5 days ago

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