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Comments

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Ubuntu Linux 14.04 LTS Trusty Tahr Released

NatasRevol Re:Code names (174 comments)

Not in Linux.

3 days ago
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SSD-HDD Price Gap Won't Go Away Anytime Soon

NatasRevol Re:RAID? (255 comments)

That's a mix of 2/3 read, 1/3 write.

With just pure read, it's 123k IOPS.
With just pure write, it's 43k IOPS.

3 days ago
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Ubuntu Linux 14.04 LTS Trusty Tahr Released

NatasRevol Re:Code names (174 comments)

Tortured Tapir.

3 days ago
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SSD-HDD Price Gap Won't Go Away Anytime Soon

NatasRevol Re:RAID? (255 comments)

This. People just don't get this.

Typical smallish RAID array is 16 drives.

RAID 5 IOPS for 7.2k drives - 675
RAID 5 IOPS for 15k drives - 1642
RAID 5 IOPS for SSD drive - 84,211

http://www.thecloudcalculator....

In an environment running lots of small disk IO, like having a VM or fifty, only one of the above will give you good performance.

4 days ago
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Pollution In China Could Be Driving Freak Weather In US

NatasRevol Re:Or it could be (157 comments)

Man, I wish I was a scientist.

So I could be bought off by the Koch brothers.

5 days ago
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Paper Microscope Magnifies Objects 2100 Times and Costs Less Than $1

NatasRevol Re:Overpriced at $0.60 (89 comments)

Shit, if that's more than 20x, I'll eat one.

Nicer, my ass.

5 days ago
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Paper Microscope Magnifies Objects 2100 Times and Costs Less Than $1

NatasRevol Re:2012 news (89 comments)

That doesn't answer siddesu's question at all.

5 days ago
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Inside the Stolen Smartphone Black Market In London

NatasRevol Re:Why can't US "journalists" do this? (109 comments)

Unfortunately, that's always the end result of having ads pay for journalism. At some point, there's always a conflict. And money will always will.

about a week ago
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Jenny McCarthy: "I Am Not Anti-Vaccine'"

NatasRevol Re:McCarthy the Playmate? (586 comments)

Also, that's a big "if" (screening causes cancer). I'm guessing the MD was trying to make a point about stupid anti-medical opinions.

Which tails very nicely into this conversation.

about a week ago
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The New 'One Microsoft' Is Finally Poised For the Future

NatasRevol Re:Are you sure? (270 comments)

I guess you haven't heard that the phrase 'spaghetti code' was invented for Windows 95.

about two weeks ago
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'weev' Conviction Vacated

NatasRevol Re:To the point... (148 comments)

So 'exceeding authorized access' isn't breaking access?

I said going through an unlocked AND open door wasn't B&E. Didn't mention trespassing or that it was legal.

Read again, illiterate fuck.

about two weeks ago
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'weev' Conviction Vacated

NatasRevol Re:To the point... (148 comments)

Please let us know what authorization scheme was broken.

Or what AT&T put into place to ensure authorization was occurring.

about two weeks ago
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'weev' Conviction Vacated

NatasRevol Re:To the point... (148 comments)

Except that the law *requires* authorization be broken.

If your door is unlocked AND open, it's not B&E.

Uh, yeah, the law works perfectly pedantically. Sorry for your obvious ignorance.

about two weeks ago
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'weev' Conviction Vacated

NatasRevol Re:To the point... (148 comments)

neither Auernheimer nor his co-conspirator
Spitler performed any “essential conduct element” of the
underlying CFAA violation

If that's not a 'not guilty' by a court that's not passing actual judgement, I don't know what is.

He did so by tricking AT&T's servers into thinking he was someone other than himself.

That doesn't mean UNauthorized.

he knew he wasn't entitled to access the information.

And yet there's no legal requirement for 'entitlement'. Just unauthorized access.

Again, there was no authorization process in AT&T's system, so he could NOT have accessed without authorization. AT&T's systems were set up with explicit full authorization in place. Everybody can access everything. Just enter the code.

about two weeks ago
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'weev' Conviction Vacated

NatasRevol Re:To the point... (148 comments)

Well, not me, but the appeals court certainly did.
This paragraphy is on page 10 of the ruling:

The charged portion of the CFAA provides that
“[w]hoever . . . intentionally accesses a computer without
authorization or exceeds authorized access, and thereby
obtains . . . information from any protected computer . . . shall
be punished as provided in subsection (c) of this section.” 18
U.S.C. 1030(a)(2)(C). To be found guilty, the Government
must prove that the defendant (1) intentionally (2) access
edwithout authorization (or exceeded authorized access to) a
(3)protected computer and(4) thereby obtained information

Then his paragraph is on page 12 of the ruling:

Because neither Auernheimer nor his co-conspirator
Spitler performed any “essential conduct element” of the
underlying CFAA violation or any overt act in furtherance of
the conspiracy in New Jersey, venue was improper on count
one.

I guess you're smarter than them.

Also, if passing a phone identifier to a query of a web server could access all this information, is that really a 'protected computer'? I'd say no.

about two weeks ago
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'weev' Conviction Vacated

NatasRevol Re:Interesting (148 comments)

Often, the legal consequences are what makes it so obvious that the law should be broken.

about two weeks ago
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'weev' Conviction Vacated

NatasRevol Re:To the point... (148 comments)

'deliberate actions' don't meet the definition of illegal behavior though.

They had to be 'accessed without authorization'. Sending different ICC-ID codes is NOT authorization. It's just a query. There was no actual authorization in place, and thus NO ACTUAL LAW WAS BROKEN.

about two weeks ago
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$250K Reward Offered In California Power Grid Attack

NatasRevol Re:$250k? (111 comments)

Hm. $250k per week is 'only' $13M per year.

Lots of CEOs in CA make that. In fact, all of the 100 highest paid CEOs make that.

http://www.aflcio.org/Corporat...

It must be good to be a gangsta.

about two weeks ago

Submissions

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Google Play privacy slip-up sends app buyers' personal details to developers

NatasRevol NatasRevol writes  |  about a year ago

NatasRevol (731260) writes "Holy crap, this is bad.

"Without asking permission, Google sends developers the personal details of everyone who buys their app from Google Play.
According to Australian developer Dan Nolan, Google sends him the name, suburb and email address of consumers that his app — enough to "track down and harass users who left negative reviews".
Nolan discovered the trove of customer data on his "merchant account" recently while updating his seller payment details.""

Link to Original Source
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332 Months of Above Average Temperature in a Row

NatasRevol NatasRevol writes  |  about a year and a half ago

NatasRevol (731260) writes "If you're less than 28 years old, you've never experienced a colder than average month for the earth. When does correlation become causation? From grist.com

If you were born in or after April 1985, if you are right now 27 years old or younger, you have never lived through a month that was colder than average.

"

Link to Original Source
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Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 Review: An Embarrassing, Lazy, Arrogant Money Grab

NatasRevol NatasRevol writes  |  about a year and a half ago

NatasRevol (731260) writes "Ron Amadeo puts the Galaxy Note 10.1 through its paces. And hates it.
"I'm sad to report that Samsung failed at execution on all fronts. Samsung has been pushing the skinning envelope further and further, and, with this revision of TouchWiz, they've slammed into a brick wall. Couple this failure with astonishingly bad hardware and a $500 price tag, and you've got yourself a real disappointment. Samsung promised us the moon, and then cut corners everywhere possible, and it's hard to walk away not feeling a little insulted.""

Link to Original Source
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The building and dismantling the Windows advantage

NatasRevol NatasRevol writes  |  about 2 years ago

NatasRevol (731260) writes "When the Macintosh was launched in 1984, computers running the MS-DOS operating system were nearing a dominant position in the market. Although PC volumes continued to grow, they did so more slowly and the Mac grew faster. What coincided with this was the emergence of portable computing. The MacBook became easily differentiable as a “better” laptop. It was not faster, did not have more storage or any key metrics being used to sell PCs. Considering the near future, it’s safe to expect a “parity” of iOS+OS X vs. Windows within one or two years. It will, most importantly, have a psychological effect. Realizing that Windows is not a hegemony will unleash market forces that nobody can predict."
Link to Original Source
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Why WikiLeaks matters, and why politicians hate it

NatasRevol NatasRevol writes  |  more than 3 years ago

NatasRevol (731260) writes "Why WikiLeaks matters,from Robert Schneer: "Writing in The Wall Street Journal, Feinstein, who strongly supported the invasions of Iraq and Afghanistan, has the audacity to call for the imprisonment of the man who, more than any other individual, has allowed the public to learn the truth about those disastrous imperial adventures-"facts long known to Feinstein as head of the Intelligence Committee but never shared with the public she claims to represent....She knew in real time that Iraq had nothing to do with the 9/11 attack, yet she voted to send young Americans to kill and be killed based on what she knew to be lies. It is her duplicity, along with the leaders of both political parties, that now stands exposed by the WikiLeaks documents. ""
Link to Original Source

Journals

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What the NSA actually is

NatasRevol NatasRevol writes  |  about 7 months ago

Man I love this comment from IamTheRealMike, http://news.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=4261215&cid=44947097

"You know, I've read this excuse a million times since Snowden did his thing, and I'm sick of it.

The problem is it's an abuse of language. Saying "Every country spies. It's one of those things governments are supposed to do" is nothing but rhetorical sleight of hand. The word spy conjures up cartoons of men in pork-pie hats and long raincoats following some traitor in a car. The word is loaded with cold war imagery. It reminds people of a time when there was an "us" vs a "them" and spying was a very small scale and targeted activity done against "them" or, at very least, those of "us" working for "them".

We need a new word to describe what's going on in todays world. Spying doesn't even come close to being the right word. How about totalitarian surveillance? But even that isn't strong enough to communicate the reality we are living in.

In today's reality there's no us vs them. There's no good vs evil, capitalism vs communism. There's just bureaucrats and their power, exercised over their own people as readily as over foreigners.

This is not only not "one of those things governments are supposed to do", it's often one of those things governments are expressly prohibited from doing by their own laws. And that's for good reasons!

Please, don't flatter the NSA by calling them spies. They aren't spies at this point. They are real life equivalents of O'Brien, the dedicated agent of totalitarian control in 1984. O'Brien is a far darker and scarier character than anyone who could be described as a spy."

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Black Ops

NatasRevol NatasRevol writes  |  more than 2 years ago

The Manhattan Project employed two hundred thousand people. It had eighty offices and dozens of production plants spread out all over the country, including a sixty-thousand-acre facility in rural Tennessee that pulled more power off the nation's electrical grid than New York City did on any given night. And no one knew the Manhattan Project was there. That is how powerful a black operation can be.

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