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Mathematical Breakthrough Sets Out Rules For More Effective Teleportation

Neil Jacklin Re:Where does extra energy go? (162 comments)

Actually I'd say that this Bacon Hypothesis is _more_ likely than breaking the conservation of energy. That seems to be among the most fundamental laws of physics.

about a year and a half ago
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Google Chrome 25 Will Serve Searches Over SSL From the Omnibox For All Users

Neil Jacklin Re:Effect on Mass Surveillance? (101 comments)

Potentially, on the other end. That is, we still have to trust the service (search, etc.) provider to not allow snooping of what we, the users, have submitted to them.

about a year and a half ago
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Mathematical Breakthrough Sets Out Rules For More Effective Teleportation

Neil Jacklin Re:Where does extra energy go? (162 comments)

Actually, the object does have _potential_ energy. I've wondered about OP's question before. I think the answer has to do with the fact that these "teleporters" don't transport matter in the conventional sense. Suppose you did have have a teleporter that could take an object and teleport it 100 ft up a hill. If you dropped the object, collected the potential energy (like in a waterwheel), and teleported it again, you shouldn't be able to violate conservation of energy or make a perpetual motion machine. So, I figure it's either A) impossible, or B) requires an energy input at _least_ equal to the change in potential energy. \\ Of course, I'm talking about gravitation potential energy, but that's just one field. There's also electromagnetic. Conversely, if it took more energy in than the net change in potential energy, where would that energy go? So I suppose the net energy input should be equal to the change in potential energy. \\ This also raises other issues, like if I teleport very far away, or two a more massive planet, I might need to input a lot of energy on this side. \\ A possible resolution to this problem is that the kind of teleportation here is just informational--that is changing one particle's state to match (or oppose) the one on the other side. Thus no mass (or charge) is transported anywhere, and everything is happy energy-wise.

about a year and a half ago

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