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Comments

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AMD Hires Bank To Explore Sale Options

Nemilar Re:i don't get it (226 comments)

Intel makes chips with more than 8 cores.

10 core Xeon: http://ark.intel.com/products/53580/Intel-Xeon-Processor-E7-8870-30M-Cache-2_40-GHz-6_40-GTs-Intel-QPI

Granted, it's incredibly expensive (as you point out) and I've only seen them in blade applications. But, they do make them. It's also worth pointing out that on the whole, one intel core gives far superior performance than one AMD core of the same clock speed (see http://www.cpubenchmark.net/high_end_cpus.html). Moreover, Intel's hyperthreading can be of a huge help, if your application profile fits.

Measuring $/core or $/CPU Cycle is not a very accurate way to gauge price/performance.

about a year and a half ago
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Medicare Bills Rise As Records Turn Electronic

Nemilar Re:Simple Fix (294 comments)

Sorry, but this is a terrible idea.

Why should something like a strep throat examination cost the same per hour as an MRI or chemotherapy?

All that will do is drastically increase the cost of basic services and make them out of reach of most people, reducing the overall access to basic medical care.

about 2 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: Storing Items In a Sealed Chest For 25 Years?

Nemilar Use a tiny PC (434 comments)

Even if no one uses the same physical media as we do now, and even if no one uses the same file formats, storing an entire PC is likely to solve the problem. You can get a small, inexpensive PC for cheap - a couple hundred dollar atom-based machine should do the trick - and throw a large amount of storage in it. I'm fairly certain that standard power connectors will still be available 30 years from now. VGA connectors may not be, so think about storing a small monitor in there as well (someone else can speak to the chances that a monitor will turn on after 30 years).

Going this route gives you practically unlimited storage for photos, music, text, etc.. with very high chances that it will be recoverable.

about 2 years ago
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Big Internet Players Propose DMARC Anti-Phishing Protocol

Nemilar Re:We already have email authentication (92 comments)

The problem with PGP/signed-emails is that you're putting the burden on the user. I'm a pretty technical guy, and I don't even want to bother with it. There's no way that the average person it going to take the time to understand and implement PGP.

The proposed solution puts the burden entirely on the system and the providers, so is more likely to be adopted and actually used (and therefore, successful in its end-purpose of stopping phishing attacks).

more than 2 years ago
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Why Do So Many College Science Majors Drop Out?

Nemilar High school doesn't prepare you for college (841 comments)

Public high school STEM classes are nowhere near sufficient as far as preparing students for a university-level STEM courseload is concerned.

Maybe if we made public education more about actually teaching and challenging students, rather than a game to see how you can bend the rules to pass the most students, then the first year of college wouldn't be such a difficult experience.

more than 2 years ago
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Newb-Friendly Linux Flavor For LAMP Server?

Nemilar Go mainstream: Ubuntu or RHEL (382 comments)

I'd suggest that you go with one of the mainstream/common Linux server distros: either RHEL (for which you can use CentOS, which is essentially the same, minus the RedHat-copyrighted bits) or Ubuntu Server.

Either of these can be configured to use a GUI. I'd actually pick RHEL/CentOS over Ubuntu, and during the install (which is graphical), you can select to install a web+database server along with a Desktop (GUI). The installation is fairly straightforward; the most complex part is arguably the partitioning, although you can use the guided partitioner to just use all free space on the disk. Partitioning isn't something that's linux-centric, although the partition scheme for Linux is perhaps a bit more complex than what'd you would expect coming from a Windows world (dedicated swap device, LVM to virtualize the partitions, etc..). If you use the guided "do it for me" option, you can avoid getting your hands wet with this complexity.

The primary reason I'd suggest going mainstream is that the support will be there. If you choose some OS that no one really uses, you'll be hard-pressed to find distro-centric documentation for it. If you go with Ubuntu or RedHat, you can use Google to get through any obstacles you may find. There are plenty of tutorials available when you google for a simple [do this task] on [this distribution]. For example:

http://www.google.com/search?gcx=w&ix=c1&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8&q=install+phpbb+on+rhel
http://www.google.com/#sclient=psy-ab&hl=en&safe=off&site=&source=hp&q=install+phpbb+on+ubuntu+server

While you could probably use this documentation to complete a task on another distro, it's helpful to have a tutorial for the specific OS you're using; all the commands will be the same, and any dependency problems, etc... will all be accounted for.

Additionally, should you decide that you want to learn more and play around, having something mainstream installed means that your learning experience will be directly relevant to anything you want to do down the line.

As an alternative, you could go with a pre-built phpBB appliance. http://www.turnkeylinux.org/phpbb is a single ISO or VDK that is built on Ubuntu Server and comes pre-configured with phpBB (they have many other applications available as well - highly recommended!). It'll ask you a few questions during the install, and once complete, you'll boot up into a fully-functional Linux server with phpBB already running.

more than 2 years ago
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3TB Hard Drive Round Up

Nemilar Graphed speeds are wrong? (238 comments)

Am I reading the graphs wrong, or are they claiming 160,000MB/s throughput on those drives?

Is that supposed to be KB/s? I might buy 160MB/s (that's still crazy high), but 160GB?

more than 2 years ago
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Ubuntu 10.10, Maverick Meerkat, Now Available

Nemilar Re:It's extremely good. (473 comments)

This comment reads as total BS.

Let me get this straight - you're running pre-release Ubuntu on 60 production machines? Where's your boss, I think he needs to have a talk with you (and show you the door). No IT professional would be caught dead doing that. Besides, let's be honest here - most accountants and managers "require" MS Office (or some other Windows-only software), and wouldn't use Ubuntu.

And what the hell are you saying about being built on Debian, which leads to professional and real-world experience, whereas Fedora doesn't have that? Have you ever heard of RHEL?

Parent comment is bunk.

more than 3 years ago
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Take This GUI and Shove It

Nemilar Re:Well there's another side to that (617 comments)

I agree that a good GUI for configuration is necessary in foreign environments. I recently had to setup a redhat cluster, and there was no way I was going to get anywhere (in any reasonable amount of time) reading the specifications and modifying the configuration XML by hand. So having the GUI (primitive though it may be) at hand was a life-saver.

But the every step of the way, when I made a configuration change in the GUI, I looked at the XML to see what it was doing. I did this for more than just curiosity, I did it to learn how the system works. Understanding the configuration files gives you an insight into the software that you simply can't get from a GUI. Speed of configuration aside (I think the author of TFA makes a good point here), the CLI is about learning and understanding.

I have to disagree with you about your main point, though. Admins had better be proficient with their shell of choice. Let's assume it's bash -- find me a sysadmin that doesn't know basic bash (for/while, if/else, variables, various conditionals, etc...), and I'll show you someone who's faking it. You don't have to be a full-on programmer, but these are the building blocks of a sysadmin's bash script, and you need to know them.

more than 3 years ago
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Obama Wants Broader Internet Wiretap Authority

Nemilar Only applies to the cloud (646 comments)

There's something missing from this entire debate -- it's things like this that will keep large business away from the cloud. One of the most important assets of a company is its confidential information, and unless a business can be certain that the information it stores on a server will remain private and confidential, there's no chance that they'll use cloud-based services.

This has the potential to drive away a lot of business from cloud services. I don't think it will affect Joe Regular on Facebook, but it might certainly turn MegaCorp Inc., and their millions of dollars, away from using cloud service.

On a related note, this bill has one fatal flaw. If I PGP encrypt my data, and don't ever share my private key, then that data remains private and uncrackable by anyone in the line of communication. So I'm not sure how useful this is for terrorism. In fact, probably not useful at all. It's probably only useful for domestic crime.

more than 3 years ago
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Best Way To Archive Emails For Later Searching?

Nemilar Re:An Advertiser's Fantasy ... (385 comments)

OK, so I hear this a lot and I never really understand the problem.

The "unwritten gmail contract" (and it actually applies to most Google products) is this: We will give you a service for free (in this case Gmail), and in return we are going to profile your use of that service to select ads for you. In the case of gmail, they give you however many GB of storage, always-on cloud email, and the best searchable email system I've ever seen. There are other Google examples, from gtalk to Google Docs. The basic principle behind it is the same, most people understand the deal, and I don't see anything wrong with it. There's no such thing as a free lunch, but this is pretty close.

more than 3 years ago
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Average Cellphone Data Usage Is 145.8 MB Per Month

Nemilar Verizon teathering (107 comments)

I'm in the 500M to 1G camp, and I'm on Verizon. The only reason my data usage is so high is because Verizon offered to give me the "mobile hotspot" feature free for life (a little app on my phone that acts as a gateway and gives me a wireless access point which then routes out to 3G). I use it literally every day, on the train, to connect my netbook to the internet.

Without the mobile hotspot, I would probably use less than 100M per month. And hey, they gave it to me free!

more than 3 years ago
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Google Chrome Extension Steals Login Details

Nemilar Re:In other news ... (155 comments)

I get your point (that a kernel module, being low-level, gives you greater access), but I think a malicious browser extension is worse.

* It's a lot less likely that a user will install a malicious kernel module, as compared to a browser plugin.
* It's a lot easier for someone with bad intentions, a few hours, and a little coding experience to write a browser plugin, than it is for them to write a kernel module.
* It's much easier to distribute a plugin, and the install base is much greater.
* The signal/noise ratio of data you would want to steal is much more attractive for a browser plugin, than it would be inside the kernel.

about 4 years ago
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Google's New Scheme To Avoid Unlicensed Music

Nemilar The entertainment companies go too far sometimes (213 comments)

I completely "get it" that the entertainment companies need to protect their copyrighted material. That's their product, and it's how they make money; fair enough that they don't want people exploiting it.

But here's an example of them going too far: The other day I was watching clips from The West Wing on Youtube. I'm not sure how exactly I got there, but regardless, it was one of my favorite shows back in the day, even though the West Wing franchise never got a dime from me either through product purchases or ads. But after seeing a couple of clips, I was reminded of how much I liked the show, and started to consider purchasing the DVD set -- until I clicked on a clip that had no sound. Then I saw that great "this video contains audio not approved by..." on the top of the screen.

Needless to say, that killed the viewing experience right there. I think when the entertainment companies revisit the sheer dollars and cents, they might see that it's beneficial to leave a lot of this copyrighted material up there -- it might generate a few sales.

about 4 years ago
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SSDs vs. Hard Drives In Value Comparison

Nemilar The consumer trend seems to be clear (263 comments)

I think the consumer trend is pretty clear with respect to SSDs (enterprise-level I think is still uncertain). Consumers like the speed and the battery savings (laptops being incredibly popular now) that SSDs provide, but of course there is no way you are going to get the sheer quantity of storage space that you can get with hard disks.

Consequently, a lot of companies are marketing "home storage servers." I've seen Lenovo, Acer, Asus, etc... all come out with small 4 or 5 bay boxes, usually running Windows Home Server, all aimed at the mid-range consumer market. It makes complete sense to put the platters in a box, where you can keep network-accessible massive storage, and to put the fast, low-power SSD into your client machine.

The problem arises when you need to access what's on that home NAS while you're out on the road. While I think many people have the upload bandwidth for streaming music, I don't think that exists for video (at least, not in the United States, or at least not where I live). So sites like hulu, etc.. will remain popular in that regard for the time being.

about 4 years ago
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SSDs vs. Hard Drives In Value Comparison

Nemilar Re:As usual, ignores the value of data integrity.. (263 comments)

I've seen, and have been able to reproduce reliably, hard disks losing their internal cache data, claiming to have written it to platter when in fact it was not. And I am /not/ talking about battery-backed RAID cache, OS write cache, or anything of that nature; I am speaking specifically of the internal hard disk cache.

When we figured out what was going on, needless to say we were all a bit shaken. But the lesson is learned: your storage needs to have a battery backup system.

about 4 years ago
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Customers Question Tech Industry's Takeover Spree

Nemilar Customer Support: not malice, it's bureaucracy (156 comments)

This past week I had two very interesting customer service experiences -- interesting because of just how different they were.

I spent probably 5 to 7 hours on the phone with HP technical support last week, trying to get them to assist me with a problem we were having with a pair of ProLiant servers. I was shuffled around to multiple departments (and, judging by the various accents, I would say I was probably shuffled to multiple continents as well), each one telling me that the next guy was the right guy to talk to about our issue (which of course he wasn't). This was for a fairly simple question about the functionality of one of their server administration tools, that no one seemed equipped to answer.

Conversely, we also had a hard disk in a ProLiant server go bad. With the serial and part numbers in hand, I was able to get a replacement shipped within 10 minutes.

The two completely different experiences I had suggests to me that when companies get large, they get very good at handling the common support problems, like bad hard disks. They develop procedures that save both the company and the customer lots of time, and are relatively painless. But what's lost is the ability to handle the out-of-the-ordinary service needs that customers have; the company is just too big, and the support guy (let's be frank, in some call center in India*) just doesn't have the resources or the knowledge to handle the problem. This leads to a frustrating experience -- whereas in a small company, these things tend to be handled quickly, because the support guy can escalate easily.

*HP doesn't even try to hide that their support is outsourced to India. If you log-on to their professional support, you can tell right away by the names.

about 4 years ago
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Russian Cargo Ship Docks At ISS On Second Try

Nemilar Re:Humans in the loop (86 comments)

Because as a child, didn't you want to be an astronaut?

OK, so you didn't actually become one. But didn't it help to spark your interest in science and technology?

about 4 years ago
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Google Builds a Native PDF Reader Into Chrome

Nemilar Re:Weird chrome problem (285 comments)

Are you using a beta version? There was a bug like that a while back, but it's been fixed for a while now. I have no problems with 5.0.375.70

more than 4 years ago

Submissions

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Using SSDs as Cache vs. Primary Storage in Enterprise

Nemilar Nemilar writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Nemilar writes "SSD has many benefits — low power, high IO bandwidth, low latency — yet their adoption has been delayed by high cost, device wear and data organization disruption. Still, SSDs are here to stay and the list of vendors and products is getting bigger every day. Rather than adopt SSD arrays as primary storage, some companies are using SSD as a cache mechanism to improve performance while holding on to their traditional storage arrays."
Link to Original Source
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Amazon in Talks with HP to Buy Palm

Nemilar Nemilar writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Nemilar writes "Who will save what’s left of Palm from HP’s bumbling? It could be Amazon, as the online retailing giant is in serious negotiations to snap up Palm from HP. No other company seems as fitting a home for Palm and its webOS software. It’s worth noting that former Palm CEO Jon Rubinstein, who now holds a vague “product innovation” role at HP’s Personal Services Group, joined Amazon’s board late last year."
Link to Original Source
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Major Enhancements in the Next Ubuntu Version (10.

Nemilar Nemilar writes  |  about 4 years ago

Nemilar (173603) writes "Maverick Meerkat, the version of Ubuntu slated to be released later this year, brings with it several features and improvements that the Linux community has been eagerly looking forward to. This article covers 5 enhancements that are listed in the blueprints for the next release of Ubuntu, and are the most interesting to end-users. In the list are software center improvements, enhancements for Ubuntu Netbook Edition, and post-release application delivery."
Link to Original Source
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Apple’s iAd: What Developers Think

Nemilar Nemilar writes  |  about 4 years ago

Nemilar writes "It’s been about a week since Apple rolled out its new advertising platform, and developers of iPhone apps are watching the earliest returns to see how much money they can expect to make from these ads. One developer reported Thursday that he earned $1400 in one day for his flashlight app. The amount iAds pay is “a high number when you get it, but you don’t get it very often,” said Dave Yonamine, the director of marketing at MobilityWare. The article discusses revenue potential in relation to the only other mobile ads platform, AdMob for Android, and claims that iAd paid $148 for the same number of ads as $1 on AdMob. What's Apple up to?"
Link to Original Source
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Will Canonical's Ubuntu-based Tablet Succeed?

Nemilar Nemilar writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Nemilar (173603) writes "Canonical's announcement of an Ubuntu-based tablet comes on the heels of the release of the Apple iPad and HP's rumored plans for a WebOS-based tablet. But Canonical’s foray into the tablet arena is fundamentally different from both the iPad and a WebOS tablet, in that it the company is primarily a software maker, and they plan to scale-down their OS rather than scaling-up a smartphone UI. The question is, will this strategy work for a general consumer product, or is Canonical's tablet going to turn into Linux fanware?"
Link to Original Source
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Jobs on the iPad: Past, Present, Future

Nemilar Nemilar writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Nemilar writes "The Wall Street Journal has an interview with Steve Jobs in which he discusses the past, present, and future of the iPad and tablet PCs. Among other things, he mentions that iPad development in 2000 was the catalyst for the iPhone, why regular PC operating systems don't scale down well for tablet PCs, and how in the future ads will be built directly into the iPhone OS. He also mentions his views on customer privacy, and his belief that customers will pay for content on the web."
Link to Original Source
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Does the Internet Make Humanity Smarter or Dumber?

Nemilar Nemilar writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Nemilar (173603) writes "The Wall Street Journal is running a pair of articles asking whether the Internet is making humanity smarter or dumber. The argument for "smarter" is that the internet is simply a change in the rules of publishing, and that the bad material is thrown away; the second story critiques the "information overload" aspect of the internet, claiming that we have traded depth of knowledge for velocity and span. What do you think? Does the internet make you stupid?"
Link to Original Source
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Preload Boosts Linux Performance Drastically

Nemilar Nemilar writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Nemilar writes "Preload is a Linux daemon that stores commonly-used libraries and binaries in memory to speed up access times, similar to the Windows Vista SuperFetch function. This article examines Preload and gives some insight into how much performance is gained for its total resource cost, and discusses basic installation and configuration to get you started."
Link to Original Source
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Travel the Universe from the Desktop with Celestia

Nemilar Nemilar writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Nemilar writes "While it may not let you go where no man has gone before, Celestia is an amazing desktop application that lets you go anywhere in the known Universe.You can view any object in the Solar System, travel to distant stars, and even leave the Galaxy, traveling faster than the speed of light, viewing high-res images of objects millions of miles away."
Link to Original Source
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Will Ajax RE's bring about Web 3.0?

Nemilar Nemilar writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Nemilar writes "Web 2.0 was marked by web-based applications. But the major limitation to all these services is that they existed solely in the realm of the Internet, and data was stored on somebody else's servers. The introduction of Ajax RE's is poised to change all that, allowing coders to write applications using existing technologies to merge the desktop with the web. Will Ajax Runtime Environments bring about Web 3.0?"
Link to Original Source
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Fluxbuntu: User-friendly Featherweight Linux?

Nemilar Nemilar writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Nemilar writes "Fluxbuntu's aim is to be a "lightweight, productive, agile, and efficient" operating system; this review takes a look at Fluxbuntu and whether it lives up to the challenge of creating a user-friendly experience on a tight resources budget. The review discusses included applications, the user interface and ease-of-use, as well as some limitations, and concludes that Fluxbuntu might be lightweight and efficient, but lacks productivity and the clean finish necessary for a user-friendly desktop."
Link to Original Source
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Virtualization in Linux: A Review of Four Software

Nemilar Nemilar writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Nemilar writes "This week Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu Linux, announced a partnership with Parallels, maker of the Virtualization products Parallels Workstation and Parallels Desktop for Mac. This makes four different virtualization programs that run on Linux, three of which are available via the Ubuntu repositories. This article compares four virtualization products available for Linux: the free, open source x86 emulator Qemu; the closed-but-free versions of VirtualBox and VMware-Server, and the commercial Parallels Workstation."
Link to Original Source
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Hardy A4: A Glimpse into the Future of Ubuntu

Nemilar Nemilar writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Nemilar writes "Ubuntu's Hardy is set to release soon, and a look at its current state shows how well it progressing, including many of the applications that are now included by default and the major changes that will improve stability and usability. Among these are the addition of Firefox 3 and Remote Desktop on the applications side, and a new method for systems control known as Policy Kit, which enables the administrator to unlock certain functions for normal users."
Link to Original Source
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TimeVault: Linux's answer to Apple's Time Machine

Nemilar Nemilar writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Nemilar writes "Apple's Time Machine made waves throughout the community for its ease of use, for bringing the critical task of backing-up to the masses. For decades, Linux gurus have been doing their backups with rsync and cron, but now TimeVault is changing all that. This review of TimeVault shows its installation and configuration, and discusses its features, as well as its various limitations. Overall, it's simple and effective enough that this cornerstone piece of software is one more example of how Linux is getting closer to being a suitable desktop operating system."
Link to Original Source

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