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Hacker Threatened With 44 Felony Charges Escapes With Misdemeanor

NormalVisual Re:Duh ... (205 comments)

Actually, on the basis of the production of an unwinnable war, we could go back to 1971 when Nixon declared the "war on drugs". This has been the justification of any number of bad policy (seizure laws and practices in particular), although generally more in the context of law enforcement than the military itself.

12 hours ago
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Hacker Threatened With 44 Felony Charges Escapes With Misdemeanor

NormalVisual Re:He still plead guilty to something ... (205 comments)

But your problem is you disagree with the voting community not that they aren't accountable to it.

It's not a difference of opinion with the voting community. It's that that prosecutors and law enforcement officers are generally not elected positions, and thus any "accountability" to the public is arm's length at best. The district attorney himself may be elected, but his staff certainly is not. As I said before, what we have now is what you're already suggesting, and it *doesn't work*. Cops can cost their departments hundreds of thousands of dollars in civil judgments, and they continue working as they did before even in the presence of overwhelming public support to have them removed. Prosecutors run roughshod over the rights of people, and it takes a huge media interest and the efforts of wealthy people to get merely the most egregious examples dealt with. The Duke lacrosse case showed that quite clearly. You get exactly as much justice as you can afford, and no more in these situations. Often the public is not even aware of what's going on, so is it okay for individuals to be financially ruined or carry around an undeserved criminal record just because the voters didn't make a big stink about it?

yesterday
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Hacker Threatened With 44 Felony Charges Escapes With Misdemeanor

NormalVisual Re:He still plead guilty to something ... (205 comments)

That's not good enough. That's the way the system works now, and what we have now provably doesn't do enough to curb the abuses often seen in either group. Both groups need to be personally accountable for their actions, beyond the lip service to accountability that they already have, but for all practical purposes doesn't exist.

yesterday
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Hacker Threatened With 44 Felony Charges Escapes With Misdemeanor

NormalVisual Re:Government abuse unpunished. (205 comments)

It all stems from the fact that the government never actually is held responsible for its mistakes.

I would argue that it's not the government itself, but the guilty people within the government that should be held accountable. If a cop beats someone up, the department/city gets sued and pays, not the cop himself. Nothing's going to change until those individuals that are willing to go outside the law have some real skin in the game.

yesterday
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Hacker Threatened With 44 Felony Charges Escapes With Misdemeanor

NormalVisual Re:Duh ... (205 comments)

IMNSHO, that's about when everything took a major wrong turn, with the neo-cons coming to the forefront.

I think you can pin it down even more accurately to on or about September 12, 2001, when the American public collectively lost their critical thinking skills and bought into practically everything the government told them.

yesterday
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Hacker Threatened With 44 Felony Charges Escapes With Misdemeanor

NormalVisual Re:He still plead guilty to something ... (205 comments)

An easy fix to that is to discard plea deals from the evaluation. How many *court cases* you've won, not how many pleas have you forced. It still doesn't fix all of the problems inherent in the current system, though.

yesterday
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Hacker Threatened With 44 Felony Charges Escapes With Misdemeanor

NormalVisual Re:He still plead guilty to something ... (205 comments)

For a justice system to function guilty people need to have reason to confess their guilt and engage in a process of reconciliation with the community.

This would need to apply to law enforcement and the prosecution as well. Not going to happen here.

yesterday
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Hacker Threatened With 44 Felony Charges Escapes With Misdemeanor

NormalVisual Re:He still plead guilty to something ... (205 comments)

If the crime you're charged with carries a maximum month sentence, you should be out on bail after the month automatically.

If you're still in jail after a month waiting for trial on a charge that only carries a 30 day sentence, you've got a good argument for a Sixth Amendment civil rights case IMO.

yesterday
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Clarificiation on the IP Address Security in Dropbox Case

NormalVisual Why I read this article (147 comments)

I have little respect for Bennett's excessive, often not carefully considered, and mostly useless prose, so I don't come to Bennett threads to actually read what spews forth from his keyboard. I read them because I find the new and different ways he gets panned by the Slashdot readership to be entertaining. He's like the Slashdot Punching Bag - you punch him, and he invariably swings back again a little later for more.

yesterday
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Clarificiation on the IP Address Security in Dropbox Case

NormalVisual Re:This is your big draw? (147 comments)

Does the Spock in your universe have a beard?

Closest thing to useful info associated with one of Bennett's posts. Spock's Beard is an awesome band.

yesterday
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How Intel and Micron May Finally Kill the Hard Disk Drive

NormalVisual Re:LOL (427 comments)

This is true for a lot of stuff. Buying a Fender electric guitar? You can get one made in the U.S., or Mexico, or Japan, or China, all priced/featured differently and of varying quality.

yesterday
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Ask Slashdot: Why Is the Power Grid So Crummy In So Many Places?

NormalVisual Re:Aerial or underground ? (495 comments)

Conversely, where I live everything is buried. We lose power for a second or two almost daily, with at least one outage longer than a minute per month.

2 days ago
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How Intel and Micron May Finally Kill the Hard Disk Drive

NormalVisual Re:LOL (427 comments)

They break unbelievably fast in comparison to any other brand I've tried.

Some people have problems with Seagate. Some have issues with WD. The Seagates in my soon-to-be-replaced colo box both have 50K+ hours on them, and the SMART logs are still clean as a whistle. I have standbys just in case though. ;-)

2 days ago
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In a Self-Driving Future, We May Not Even Want To Own Cars

NormalVisual Re:What people want... (453 comments)

It would sure cut a lot of commuting if all a person needed to do to get to work was to take the elevator.

Probably would cut out a lot of time off too - "Dave, I know it's your day off, but can you come upstairs real quick to look at this server issue?"

4 days ago
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In a Self-Driving Future, We May Not Even Want To Own Cars

NormalVisual Re:Flawed Premise (453 comments)

for the same reasons that automatic transmissions last longer than manual trannies

Unless you know how to properly drive a car with a standard. Standards have far fewer points of failure, and the part that most often is replaced is the clutch, and that usually fails because people ride it or otherwise find a way to burn it up through improper use. Clutch repairs are something I can do in my driveway and are reasonably inexpensive. Practically anything involving an automatic (aside from changing fluid/filter) involves taking it to a shop, and often ends up costing thousands of dollars. There's a reason you don't often see tractor-trailers with automatics, and they can go hundreds of thousands of miles before needing transmission service.

4 days ago
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In a Self-Driving Future, We May Not Even Want To Own Cars

NormalVisual Re:Cars are just part of what's on the road (453 comments)

The trucks and vans can be self driving too.

Self-driving trucks will entail a *far* more comprehensive level of automation than cars. Just getting a tractor-trailer to make a successful turn at a tight, busy intersection will be an interesting problem to solve.

4 days ago
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In a Self-Driving Future, We May Not Even Want To Own Cars

NormalVisual Re:In a Self-Driving Future--- (453 comments)

Sure frustrated drivers will force their way into the fast lane and jam up traffic (as they do now), but the cars will record the reckless driving, likely by a few 'angles', eventually, it'll become a citation to do it.

It's already against the law to do this (in most places in the U.S., anyway), and I see the police ignore it all the time even when it's happening right in front of them. If they spent half the time on enforcing left-lane and improper turn laws as they do on speeding, they'd have full coffers and much smoother-flowing traffic to boot. Probably would also have a downtick in accidents too.

4 days ago
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Judge Unseals 500+ Stingray Records

NormalVisual NDAs (162 comments)

Regarding the NDAs that have been signed with Harris and the government not to disclose information regarding the Stingray devices - I was under the impression that a civil contract could not override state or federal law, and any such clauses requiring such are non-enforceable. These judges need to be finding every single one of the officers and prosecutors in contempt when they present "but we're under an NDA" as an argument in a court of law.

4 days ago
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What is your computer most often plugged into?

NormalVisual Re:UPS (233 comments)

That's right, rather than keep my computer running through power outages, it was shutting my computer off during stable power.

I've had battery failures before as well, but they've never shut the power off. Only ones I've seen that will do that are true UPSs instead of the *much* more popular standby UPSs, which is part of the reason I bought standby units to begin with. There aren't too many anymore that can't switch to battery power fast enough to keep a PC up, and if you're using a true UPS that doesn't spit out a true sine wave (most are stepped square wave), it'll shorten the lifespan on your power supply considerably.

about a week ago

Submissions

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Original 11' Enterprise Studio Model Being Restored, Yet Again

NormalVisual NormalVisual writes  |  about 2 months ago

NormalVisual (565491) writes "The original 11-foot U.S.S. Enterprise studio model from the original series has gone back into the shop again. The Smithsonian owns the model and has had it on display in a gift shop at the National Air and Space Museum for the last 13 years, but will be placed on display in the Boeing Milestones of Flight Hall in 2016, to coincide with the museum's 40th anniversary. In the meantime, the model will be undergoing its fourth restoration to address a number of issues. The last restoration in 1991 was performed by Ed Miarecki, a professional modelmaker well known for his work in "Star Trek: The Next Generation", as well as films such as "Event Horizon". This previous restoration had Trek fans up in arms owing to the paint job, which many feel doesn't represent the way the model looked originally. Hopefully this next restoration will bring her back to her former glory."
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Supreme Court Refuses to Hear Newegg Patent Case

NormalVisual NormalVisual writes  |  about 10 months ago

NormalVisual (565491) writes ""It's a really tough time to be a patent owner", said Soverain Software, LLC president Katharine Wolanyk, after the Supreme Court refused to hear their appeal after the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit invalidated three of Soverain's shopping cart patents. Soverain had sued Newegg for allegedly infringing the patents in question, and had won in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Texas. Newegg later had the decision overturned on appeal, with the court ruling that the patents in question were obvious, and thus invalid."
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Jack Daniels Shows How to Write a Cease and Desist Letter

NormalVisual NormalVisual writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NormalVisual (565491) writes "When the Jack Daniels distillery recently became aware of a book whose cover they felt substantially infringed their trademark, they didn't go into instant "Terminator mode" — instead, they wrote a very thoughtful, civil letter to the infringing party, and even offered to help defray the costs of coming into compliance. I believe plenty of other companies (and many in the tech world) could use this as an example of how *not* to alienate people and come off looking like a bunch of greedy jerks."
Link to Original Source
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Whose Cameras Are Watching New York Roads?

NormalVisual NormalVisual writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NormalVisual (565491) writes "License-plate reading cameras are popping up on utility poles all over St. Lawrence County in upstate New York, but no one is willing to say who they belong to . One camera was found by a utility crew, removed from the pole, and given to the local police. "Massena Police Chief Timmy Currier said he returned it to the owner, but wouldn’t say how he knew who the owner was, nor would he say who he gave it to....(Andrew) McMahon, the superintendent at Massena Electric Department, said one of his crews found a box on one of their poles and took it down because “it was in the electric space,” the top tier of wires on the pole above the telephone and cable TV wires, and whoever put it there had taken a chance with electrocution. He said they had never received a request or been informed about its placement.""
Link to Original Source
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Australian Restaurant To Use iPads As Menus

NormalVisual NormalVisual writes  |  more than 4 years ago

NormalVisual (565491) writes "The Pearl restaurant in Melbourne will soon begin using Apple iPads running custom software to describe the available culinary options to its customers. Chris Lucas, the proprietor, has spent $40,000 in development costs on top of the costs of the devices themselves in order to research the food offerings in as much detail as they choose.

No word regarding the expected longevity of the iMenus, but it's doubtful they'll deal with spills and accidental drops nearly as well as paper menus."

Link to Original Source
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Sony Offices Raided In Copyright Dispute

NormalVisual NormalVisual writes  |  more than 5 years ago

NormalVisual (565491) writes "A copyright dispute between Latin recording artist Alejandro Fernández and Sony Music has resulted in more than 6,000 CDs being seized from Sony's Mexico City office by the Mexican police, along with master tapes and cover art. Fernández's contract with Sony was for seven albums, and the label had compiled and was attempting to market and sell an eighth album, created from previously unreleased tracks. The seizure comes two weeks after Sony ignored a cease and desist letter from Fernández's attornies. Sony of course maintains it has done nothing wrong."
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Seagate 1TB Drives Failing at Alarming Rate

NormalVisual NormalVisual writes  |  more than 5 years ago

NormalVisual (565491) writes "Owners of Seagate 1TB drives have been experiencing serious issues of late — many recent 7200.11 Barracuda SATA drives have a problem with the version SD15 firmware that often results in the drive failing on power-up after working perfectly fine for a time. While the data on the drive appears to be safe, the drive is completely bricked, resulting in the inability to flash it to any further firmware revisions without a bit of hardware hacking. The problem is making for an interesting discussion on Seagate's community forums, particularly since Seagate still refuses to acknowledge the issue and is tightly censoring the "official" discussion on the forums, so many 7200.11 owners are having to discuss the issue outside of Seagate's control. Tom's Hardware has also picked up the increasingly-vocal story. So, if you've got one of the big Barracudas, it's probably a good idea to to stay on top of those backups."
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"Cloverfield" Trailer Available on Apple.c

NormalVisual NormalVisual writes  |  about 7 years ago

NormalVisual (565491) writes "After much waiting and speculation, the hi-def trailer for J.J. Abrams' new monster movie "Cloverfield" has finally been made available on Apple's web site. Still no really clear shots of the monster(s), but we really didn't expect that, did we? Let the hours of vapid and pointless speculation begin!"
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MythTV Listings To Cost $15 for 3 Months

NormalVisual NormalVisual writes  |  more than 7 years ago

NormalVisual (565491) writes "Schedules Direct, the folks that have been working towards providing listing data for MythTV users in the shadow of the impending shutdown of existing listing services by Zap2It, has finally announced pricing for their soon-to-be-available service. They will be initially charging $15 for a 3-month subscription, but anticipate substantial price decreases as they get more people on board. I for one am quite happy to hear this news."
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NormalVisual NormalVisual writes  |  more than 7 years ago

NormalVisual (565491) writes "The mailing lists were buzzing recently when Michael Buesch, one of the maintainers for the GPL'd bc43xx Broadcom wireless chip driver project, called the OpenBSD folks to task for apparently including code without permission from his project in the OpenBSD bcw project, which aims to provide functionality with Broadcom wireless chips under that OS. It seems that the problem has been resolved for now with the BSD driver author totally giving up on the project and Theo De Raadt taking the position that Buesch's posts on the subject were "inhuman"."
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NormalVisual NormalVisual writes  |  more than 7 years ago

NormalVisual (565491) writes "U.S. District Judge Deborah A. Batts ruled today that recording XM Satellite Radio broadcasts using the built-in recording functionality of some XM receivers is not equivalent to taping music off the radio with an analog cassette deck, as detailed in this article. The judge's reasoning was that the built-in recorders in XM units essentially make XM a broadcaster and distributor, whereas XM is only paying to be a broadcaster."
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NormalVisual NormalVisual writes  |  more than 8 years ago

NormalVisual (565491) writes "It appears that the unconstitutional and controversial warrantless surveillance program being conducted by the Bush Administration can continue until an appeals court can hear the case, according to this AP article. The 6th Circuit ruled that while the lower court had ruled the program was unconstitutional, they felt that the case's chances before the appeals court and the possible danger to national security warranted their decision to let it continue despite the likelihood that the appeal process will take months.

Good to know that the whole "separation of powers" thing works so well for keeping the government in check, eh?"

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