×

Announcing: Slashdot Deals - Explore geek apps, games, gadgets and more. (what is this?)

Thank you!

We are sorry to see you leave - Beta is different and we value the time you took to try it out. Before you decide to go, please take a look at some value-adds for Beta and learn more about it. Thank you for reading Slashdot, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

NASA 'Emails' a Socket Wrench To the ISS

NormalVisual Re:My sockets are made of high quality steel (142 comments)

Wouldn't an impact wrench have been a more appropriate tool in that case?

Yes it would, but I didn't have one available at the time.

Or a regular wrench + a good number of firm taps with a hammer?

Tried that before breaking out the jack.

An 18" lever and floor jack sounds like a good recipe to break off a frozen bolt.

Yeah, it is a lot of times. After the first attempt, I let it sit for a couple of days with penetrating oil on it, and I had the drill ready to go if things went south. I was frankly surprised that the bolt *didn't* break, and even more surprised that the threads were perfectly clean, with just a little bit of blue Loctite on them.

yesterday
top

NASA 'Emails' a Socket Wrench To the ISS

NormalVisual Re:My sockets are made of high quality steel (142 comments)

Those parts are bigger than the output. The highest force is applied to the output, not the ratcheting mechanism, because the output is of lesser diameter.

That's assuming that the fastener is the smallest element in the system, and things get worse very quickly when the fastener is substantially bigger than the drive. In my particular case, it was a 1/2" drive on an 18mm socket, and it was the drive that broke. The size of the ratchet head was about an inch, so I'm guessing the ratchet itself was also around 18mm. Ratchet survived, but was kinda useless without the drive, and it wasn't worth it to open the wrench up and replace it. :-)

Having said that, I hadn't thought about grossly oversized ratchets/drives in conjunction with small fasteners. If you're turning a 1/2" bolt using a Hulk-like plastic ratchet with a 1" drive, you will have a lot more mechanical advantage to work with.

yesterday
top

NASA 'Emails' a Socket Wrench To the ISS

NormalVisual Re:My sockets are made of high quality steel (142 comments)

If a finer part of the tool survived but a thicker broke, doesn't it seem very plausible that the tool was either badly designed or that the manufacturer have problems in their molding process.

I guarantee that was the case (although steel hand tools are generally forged, not molded) - it's not like I was using a high-end Snap-On wrench. Just the same, the crappiest steel tool is going to be stronger than any ABS tool of comparable dimensions.

You are talking about managing to break a hand powered tool. With a good design that have been correctly manufactured that shouldn't be possible. Plastic or steel, it is perfectly possible to create ratchets strong enough that your arm will break before the tool.

I also mentioned that the bolt was tight enough to require a floor jack to get enough torque on it, so it was under far more torque than any person could apply. That *still* should not have been adequate to break the drive, but it did. It's possible to make very strong ratchets with a variety of plastics in a size readily usable as a hand tool, but neither ABS nor PLA is one of them

yesterday
top

NASA 'Emails' a Socket Wrench To the ISS

NormalVisual Re:My sockets are made of high quality steel (142 comments)

3d printers are working in metals now. Carbon fiber as well.

The one in question doesn't, so this statement is irrelevant to the discussion.

I don't know how to deal with someone with so little vision that they can't understand the value of fabricating tools on site when the alternative costs thousands of dollars a pound and has turn-around measured in months.

Spend as much time as I have in tool manufacturing facilities and working with engineers to optimize production processes (including 3D sintering, which already was old news 10 years ago), and then once you've done that, go back and read the original post and explain where "little vision" comes from. I said nothing regarding 3D prototyping/manufacturing in general, but you'd know that if you actually read what I wrote.

" So I'd ask you to just stay away from the Internet."

Says the AC. Whatever, dude.

yesterday
top

NASA 'Emails' a Socket Wrench To the ISS

NormalVisual Re:My sockets are made of high quality steel (142 comments)

It certainly doesn't sound like it when you jump to the conclusion that the largest and sturdiest part of a tool would fail before the fine tool end that contacts the nut.

I'm not an M.E., but I've seen enough drives/ratchets break with intact sockets (and no, they weren't impact sockets) to know that one can't make that statement categorically.

yesterday
top

NASA 'Emails' a Socket Wrench To the ISS

NormalVisual Re:My sockets are made of high quality steel (142 comments)

so the force increases as you get closer to the nut/screw.

You're absolutely right, which means the *ratchet and drive* are under the highest stress.

yesterday
top

NASA 'Emails' a Socket Wrench To the ISS

NormalVisual Re:My sockets are made of high quality steel (142 comments)

It's not a contrived (that means "unlikely and made up for the purposes of the argument", BTW) example - it actually did happen, and happens more often than you might think. Just because a good portion of the ISS was built under ideal conditions doesn't mean that fasteners can't stick. There are parts that have been in space for more than 15 years, after all.

But to respond to your statement directly, no, a metal socket isn't going to help the first bit when the drive, ratchet, or handle is made of a flimsy plastic like ABS or PLA, even if it's injection molded. If the fastener is hard enough to turn that it breaks an ABS socket, then it's going to break the wrench instead when you use a steel socket on it.

yesterday
top

NASA 'Emails' a Socket Wrench To the ISS

NormalVisual Re:My sockets are made of high quality steel (142 comments)

If you attach a metal socket, it's probably quite capable.

I wouldn't expect a lot. I snapped the solid steel drive on a 1/2" ratchet right off the last time I did my brakes trying to get a frozen caliper bolt out . It took an 18" breaker bar with a 3/4" drive in combination with a floor jack to get enough torque on the breaker bar to finally get the bolt loose. I don't foresee an ABS tool handling that kind of stress.

yesterday
top

Ask Slashdot: Is an Open Source .NET Up To the Job?

NormalVisual Re:You seem to think .NET is a language (392 comments)

Not even that, Visual C++ .NET is a broken aberration that I have not seen used anywhere ever

C++/CLI gets used plenty, but mostly in places where straight C++ has to interact with other managed code. It works, but C# is a *lot* easier to deal with if you're staying completely within the managed environment. If you don't have the need to mix them, you likely won't see it. In my case, I've had to use it both at my current job and the one previous when integrating legacy C++ code with newer .Net stuff.

2 days ago
top

At 40, a person is ...

NormalVisual Re:40 is an artificial boundary (202 comments)

Posted as AC because I don't feel like putting up with all the haters and doubters who will shitpost because they hate me for reminding them how much they're lacking, and the jerks who will call me a liar.

On the contrary, it's a good reminder that our bodies are really remarkable machines, and can often come back effectively from a lifetime of abuse if you make effort to do it.

2 days ago
top

65,000 Complaints Later, Microsoft Files Suit Against Tech Support Scammers

NormalVisual Re:OT: Jehovah's witnesses once hung up on me (237 comments)

A friend and I had some fun at the Jehovah's Witnesses' expense about 30 years ago. I was over at his place, and there was a knock at the door. He peeked outside and said "Dude, it's the Jehovah's Witnesses, come here!" He threw his arm around me and answered the door in a very lispy voice, and they were mostly speechless. He then looked at me and said, "Well hun, I don't guess they have anything to say, so let's go back to bed!" and shut the door on them. He never got another knock again.

2 days ago
top

Dr. Dobb's 38-Year Run Comes To an End

NormalVisual Re:One of the cornerstones (156 comments)

Same here. Still have a bookshelf full of old Byte rags.

5 days ago
top

Attorney Yasir Billoo Explains NDA Law (Video)

NormalVisual Re:Who was forced to sign an NDA? (38 comments)

I mean, I didn't have to sign it but i'd not have got the job otherwise. Doesn't mean you agree with it. Hell, doesn't mean you're going to obey it, but all that comes later.

Then you weren't willing to walk away from it. Signing an agreement you have no intention of keeping can be a recipe for a lot of expense later on.

5 days ago
top

Attorney Yasir Billoo Explains NDA Law (Video)

NormalVisual Re:Who was forced to sign an NDA? (38 comments)

I've walked away from bad agreements, and I'm not shy about crossing stuff out that I don't find acceptable. So far I haven't had anyone refuse to hire me because of that. As Billoo said, you have to be assertive about your own best interests because you're the only one looking out for them.

5 days ago
top

Judge Rules Drug Maker Cannot Halt Sales of Alzheimer's Medicine

NormalVisual Re:Can you say... (266 comments)

In the U.S. there hasn't ever been an exploitation requirement per se. The only kind of IP that explicitly requires action by the holder is a trademark, which they're required to aggressively defend at the risk of losing it otherwise. However, it used to be that you could file an application and tie up the approval process for years without it actually being issued, which effectively let you secretly hold a patent as long as you wanted and have it formally issued only when it was to your advantage to do so. About 20 years ago the U.S. changed patent terms from "date of issuance" to "date of filing", so the clock now starts ticking when you first send in the application.

about a week ago
top

Blade Runner 2 Script Done, Harrison Ford Says "the Best Ever"

NormalVisual Re: Why does this need a sequel? (299 comments)

We don't know, because she never gets in a fight in the movie, or does anything at all where her physical abilities are tested.

Not per se, but she does make short work of Leon when it's obvious that he's going to kill Deckard.

about a week ago
top

Peru Indignant After Greenpeace Damages Ancient Nazca Site

NormalVisual Re:The disturbed sand? (465 comments)

How indignant is Peru when a wind storm comes through?

Not very, because there's practically no wind in the area. Additionally, the coated pebbles protect the ground even during those rare windy days.

about two weeks ago
top

Dad Makes His Kid Play Through All Video Game History In Chronological Order

NormalVisual Re:In summary... (222 comments)

Forcing ANYONE to play either E.T. or (even worse) Friday the 13th on an Atari console would probably be classified as both cruel AND unusual.

I didn't have Friday the 13th, but I still have my E.T. cart, and M*A*S*H and Porky's as well!

about two weeks ago

Submissions

top

Original 11' Enterprise Studio Model Being Restored, Yet Again

NormalVisual NormalVisual writes  |  about 3 months ago

NormalVisual (565491) writes "The original 11-foot U.S.S. Enterprise studio model from the original series has gone back into the shop again. The Smithsonian owns the model and has had it on display in a gift shop at the National Air and Space Museum for the last 13 years, but will be placed on display in the Boeing Milestones of Flight Hall in 2016, to coincide with the museum's 40th anniversary. In the meantime, the model will be undergoing its fourth restoration to address a number of issues. The last restoration in 1991 was performed by Ed Miarecki, a professional modelmaker well known for his work in "Star Trek: The Next Generation", as well as films such as "Event Horizon". This previous restoration had Trek fans up in arms owing to the paint job, which many feel doesn't represent the way the model looked originally. Hopefully this next restoration will bring her back to her former glory."
top

Supreme Court Refuses to Hear Newegg Patent Case

NormalVisual NormalVisual writes  |  about a year ago

NormalVisual (565491) writes ""It's a really tough time to be a patent owner", said Soverain Software, LLC president Katharine Wolanyk, after the Supreme Court refused to hear their appeal after the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit invalidated three of Soverain's shopping cart patents. Soverain had sued Newegg for allegedly infringing the patents in question, and had won in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Texas. Newegg later had the decision overturned on appeal, with the court ruling that the patents in question were obvious, and thus invalid."
top

Jack Daniels Shows How to Write a Cease and Desist Letter

NormalVisual NormalVisual writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NormalVisual (565491) writes "When the Jack Daniels distillery recently became aware of a book whose cover they felt substantially infringed their trademark, they didn't go into instant "Terminator mode" — instead, they wrote a very thoughtful, civil letter to the infringing party, and even offered to help defray the costs of coming into compliance. I believe plenty of other companies (and many in the tech world) could use this as an example of how *not* to alienate people and come off looking like a bunch of greedy jerks."
Link to Original Source
top

Whose Cameras Are Watching New York Roads?

NormalVisual NormalVisual writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NormalVisual (565491) writes "License-plate reading cameras are popping up on utility poles all over St. Lawrence County in upstate New York, but no one is willing to say who they belong to . One camera was found by a utility crew, removed from the pole, and given to the local police. "Massena Police Chief Timmy Currier said he returned it to the owner, but wouldn’t say how he knew who the owner was, nor would he say who he gave it to....(Andrew) McMahon, the superintendent at Massena Electric Department, said one of his crews found a box on one of their poles and took it down because “it was in the electric space,” the top tier of wires on the pole above the telephone and cable TV wires, and whoever put it there had taken a chance with electrocution. He said they had never received a request or been informed about its placement.""
Link to Original Source
top

Australian Restaurant To Use iPads As Menus

NormalVisual NormalVisual writes  |  more than 4 years ago

NormalVisual (565491) writes "The Pearl restaurant in Melbourne will soon begin using Apple iPads running custom software to describe the available culinary options to its customers. Chris Lucas, the proprietor, has spent $40,000 in development costs on top of the costs of the devices themselves in order to research the food offerings in as much detail as they choose.

No word regarding the expected longevity of the iMenus, but it's doubtful they'll deal with spills and accidental drops nearly as well as paper menus."

Link to Original Source
top

Sony Offices Raided In Copyright Dispute

NormalVisual NormalVisual writes  |  more than 5 years ago

NormalVisual (565491) writes "A copyright dispute between Latin recording artist Alejandro Fernández and Sony Music has resulted in more than 6,000 CDs being seized from Sony's Mexico City office by the Mexican police, along with master tapes and cover art. Fernández's contract with Sony was for seven albums, and the label had compiled and was attempting to market and sell an eighth album, created from previously unreleased tracks. The seizure comes two weeks after Sony ignored a cease and desist letter from Fernández's attornies. Sony of course maintains it has done nothing wrong."
top

Seagate 1TB Drives Failing at Alarming Rate

NormalVisual NormalVisual writes  |  more than 5 years ago

NormalVisual (565491) writes "Owners of Seagate 1TB drives have been experiencing serious issues of late — many recent 7200.11 Barracuda SATA drives have a problem with the version SD15 firmware that often results in the drive failing on power-up after working perfectly fine for a time. While the data on the drive appears to be safe, the drive is completely bricked, resulting in the inability to flash it to any further firmware revisions without a bit of hardware hacking. The problem is making for an interesting discussion on Seagate's community forums, particularly since Seagate still refuses to acknowledge the issue and is tightly censoring the "official" discussion on the forums, so many 7200.11 owners are having to discuss the issue outside of Seagate's control. Tom's Hardware has also picked up the increasingly-vocal story. So, if you've got one of the big Barracudas, it's probably a good idea to to stay on top of those backups."
top

"Cloverfield" Trailer Available on Apple.c

NormalVisual NormalVisual writes  |  more than 7 years ago

NormalVisual (565491) writes "After much waiting and speculation, the hi-def trailer for J.J. Abrams' new monster movie "Cloverfield" has finally been made available on Apple's web site. Still no really clear shots of the monster(s), but we really didn't expect that, did we? Let the hours of vapid and pointless speculation begin!"
top

MythTV Listings To Cost $15 for 3 Months

NormalVisual NormalVisual writes  |  more than 7 years ago

NormalVisual (565491) writes "Schedules Direct, the folks that have been working towards providing listing data for MythTV users in the shadow of the impending shutdown of existing listing services by Zap2It, has finally announced pricing for their soon-to-be-available service. They will be initially charging $15 for a 3-month subscription, but anticipate substantial price decreases as they get more people on board. I for one am quite happy to hear this news."
top

NormalVisual NormalVisual writes  |  more than 7 years ago

NormalVisual (565491) writes "The mailing lists were buzzing recently when Michael Buesch, one of the maintainers for the GPL'd bc43xx Broadcom wireless chip driver project, called the OpenBSD folks to task for apparently including code without permission from his project in the OpenBSD bcw project, which aims to provide functionality with Broadcom wireless chips under that OS. It seems that the problem has been resolved for now with the BSD driver author totally giving up on the project and Theo De Raadt taking the position that Buesch's posts on the subject were "inhuman"."
top

NormalVisual NormalVisual writes  |  more than 7 years ago

NormalVisual (565491) writes "U.S. District Judge Deborah A. Batts ruled today that recording XM Satellite Radio broadcasts using the built-in recording functionality of some XM receivers is not equivalent to taping music off the radio with an analog cassette deck, as detailed in this article. The judge's reasoning was that the built-in recorders in XM units essentially make XM a broadcaster and distributor, whereas XM is only paying to be a broadcaster."
top

NormalVisual NormalVisual writes  |  more than 8 years ago

NormalVisual (565491) writes "It appears that the unconstitutional and controversial warrantless surveillance program being conducted by the Bush Administration can continue until an appeals court can hear the case, according to this AP article. The 6th Circuit ruled that while the lower court had ruled the program was unconstitutional, they felt that the case's chances before the appeals court and the possible danger to national security warranted their decision to let it continue despite the likelihood that the appeal process will take months.

Good to know that the whole "separation of powers" thing works so well for keeping the government in check, eh?"

Journals

NormalVisual has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?